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Medals to the Natal Police 2 years 1 month ago #72287

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This pair was just posted under the Durban Light Infantry thread but I will repeat it here.


Picture courtesy of DNW

QSA (2) Natal, Transvaal (874 Pte C. [sic] Elliott. Durban L.I.);
Natal (1) 1906 (Tpr: C. E. Elliott, Natal Police.)

Served between 1 December 1899 and June 1901.

QSA verified. One the roll for the Natal Medal.
Dr David Biggins
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Medals to the Natal Police 2 years 5 days ago #73198

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The DMC group to Sub Inspector James Herbert Evans: www.angloboerwar.com/forum/5-medals-and-...-war?start=306#73197
Dr David Biggins

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Medals to the Natal Police 2 years 5 days ago #73199

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From the next City Coins auction, November 2020

Defence of the Magistracy at Mahlabatini, 28 April 1901

One of the most serious conflicts in which the Natal Police took part in was the defence of the magistracy at Mahlabatini on 28 April 1901. About a score of the police under Sgt Locke were brigaded at Dundee and received orders to entrain for Zululand. From the Tugela they rode up to Melmoth, where a standing camp was pitched for some weeks until further orders were received for them to go on a four days’ patrol to Mahlabatini. A camp was established outside the courthouse and every morning before dawn a four-man patrol was sent along the road towards Emtonjeneni. This patrol went out as usual on the day of the attack. As the men were riding past a mealie patch, about two miles from the camp, a shot was fired, and one of the patrol galloped back to camp reporting the incident.

The whole force quickly moved out under Sergeant Locke, with Mr. Wheelwright, the magistrate, and Colonel Bottomley. They rode quickly down the road, made a thorough search of the mealie patch. Finding nothing they went along the veldt towards the Emtonjeneni store, about three miles away, until they came to where the road divides with the main track passing to the left, and a path going straight on through some wattle trees.

The magistrate, with four men, went to the left, galloping to the top of a ridge, where they came under a hail of bullets. The sun was just rising, showing the troopers up very clearly on the skyline, and providing an excellent target for the Boers, who were concealed in the trees. On hearing shots, the advance party of the men who had gone along the path got into skirmishing order, and entered the trees, where they were ambushed. They were shot down to a man, every one of them receiving two or more wounds.

The remainder of the troop hastily opened out, and arrived on the scene at a gallop, just as a Boer named Van Niekerk, more courageous than the others, came out of the trees to demand the surrender of the whole troop. This was refused, so he instantly fired, hitting one of the horses; but he in return received a bullet fired by Trooper J. Smith. The police dismounted and took cover, spreading well out and firing at the slightest movement of the enemy. After some hours the Boers were driven off and the dead and wounded troopers were placed in a police wagon. Sergeant Locke had been very badly injured within an hour of the opening of hostilities. He was found lying on the ground with his head on his saddle, and Van Niekerk, also badly wounded, being near him. Sergeant Locke was with difficulty lifted on to the wagon, which went slowly towards the camp, but as the jolting was so bad a stretcher was improvised. No natives had been seen about all day, but fortunately at this moment a party of thirty of them in full war paint appeared. They were told to carry the stretcher in which Sergeant Locke was lying, but they were in a violent frame of mind.

Killed: Sergeant Collett (seven wounds in one leg), Troopers Cameron, Salmond and Nelson.

Mortally wounded: Sergeant Locke and Trooper Aldwinkle.

Wounded: Trooper Smith.

Sergeant Locke died the same evening and Trooper Aldwinkle about a month later. Trooper Smith recovered and became a warder at the central gaol at Pietermaritzburg.

The defence had been maintained by 3 non-commissioned officers and 19 troopers of the Natal Police. It was afterwards discovered that the enemy had numbered about 150 (some reports suggest 400), and the little British force killed nine of them. The rest went back, and, thinking they had been opposed by a regiment, shot their native spies, who had told them that there were only a few men of the police there. When they discovered how many troopers there really were at Mahlabatini they sent along a disconcerting message to the effect that they would pay a visit to the camp on the first moonlight night and wipe out every man there.

In “The Nongqai” – the official police magazine – a photograph of the survivors appeared along with a brief account of the action which read as follows: “The Magistracy, Mahlabatini, Zululand, was attacked by a large force of Boers at 5am yesterday. The defence was maintained by a detachment of the Natal Police Field Force, comprising 3 N.C.O’s, 19 men and 2 civil servants. The fighting lasted 6 hours, and resulted in the defeat and repulse of the Boers, who numbered 400 strong (according to computation of prisoners captured).

QSA (3) TugH, RoL, Tvl (2339 Tpr. J. Aldwinckle. Natal Police)
Official correction to first part of surname.

Trooper Aldwinckle was in the advance party that were ambushed when they entered the trees and was dangerously wounded by a bullet shattering his right shoulder. He and the two other wounded men had to lie in the Court Room without dressings, drugs or medicines. The District Surgeon at Nongoma, 30 miles to the North, reached them at 7 pm, by which time one of the men had already died. Three days later a Surgeon and Nursing Sister arrived from Maritzburg to amputate Aldwinckle’s arm and shoulder. This did not save him: he died of his wounds on 24 May.
Dr David Biggins

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Medals to the Natal Police 1 year 4 months ago #77555

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2486 TPR. S. W. MOSS-BLUNDELL. NATAL POLICE

QUEEN'S SOUTH AFRICA MEDAL
CLASPS:TRANSVAAL /SOUTH AFRICA 1901/SOUTH AFRICA 1902
CONDITION :VF WITH EDGE NICKS

Stanley Whitaker Moss-blundell was born in Ferriby, North Yorkshire in 1883,the youngest of three children of Edward and Helen Moss. Stanley's grandfather, William Henry Moss (1816-1874), had married Eliza Charlotte Blundell (1818-1888), from a paint manufacturing company in Hull. It may have been a stipulation in the will of Stanley's grandparents that their two surnames should be combined for their grandchildren. This was common practice in society at that time. By 1892 the whole family had adopted the surname Moss-blundell.

His military service begins as a 2nd lieutenant in the Londonderry Artillery. He resigned his commission on 13th February 1901, presumably to go and do his patriotic duty in South Africa

The next reference I find to Stanley appears in the Daily Orders of the Natal Police dated 1st March 1901, signed off by the Inspector as follows :

"Sergt. Mccarthy having completed nine years service in the corps is permitted to re-engage for a further period of three years from 1st March.
The undermentioned men from England per" SS Dunvegan" having been taken on the strength of the force, viz:-
2486-Stanley Whitaker Moss-blundell "

Stanley was one of 31 new recruits arriving that day.

Daily Orders dated 2nd April 1902 inform us that Stanley was promoted to the rank and pay of Trooper 1st Class after one year's service on 1st March 1902. He is referred to as 2486 Blundell on this occasion.

The Medal Roll for the Natal Police (WO100/261) confirms his entitlement to the clasps present on his QSA. He was not entitled to the KSA.
Stanley was discharged some time in 1905 and his medal issued 26th February 1906.

Of local interest to myself is the forwarding address for issue of his medal,which is given as Longdon Hill, Evesham, Worcestershire.

The 1911 Census finds him as a married man (married 1907)living at the above mentioned address. There are no details of his wife at this address, but there are two children who reside with him:3 year old Joyce and Valerie aged 1.
His recorded occupation as a fruit grower must have been profitable as there are three domestic servants recorded. Although the family means could well have been a benefit of inheritance as previously mentioned.

During the Great War, Stanley served as a Captain, enlisting in the 1st Battalion Kings Yorkshire Light Infantry and joining the Battalion in France on 26th May 1915.

He has a Medal Index Card which indicates service in France and confirms entitlement to the Great War trio of 1914/15 Star, British War Medal and the Victory Medal.
His address is now shown as Laurel Bank, Saltash, Cornwall. However, his permanent address is given as :St. Malo, Osborne Road, Shanklin, Isle of Wight.
He had sold his fruit farm at Wickham Ford, Longdon Hill, Evesham on 24th March 1914.

Stanley's name appears in the London Gazette in 1940 having rejoined the Army on 3rd July 1940 during the second world war. He was now in his mid to late fifties.

A veteran of three wars, Stanley Whitaker Moss-Blundell died in 1963.

QSA recently acquired from DNW sale on 21st July. Maybe his other decorations are out there somewhere?
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Medals to the Natal Police 1 year 3 months ago #78131

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Picture courtesy of DNW

QSA (1) Natal (1751 Tpr: F. W. Carey. Natal Police);
KSA (2) (107 Tpr: F. W. Carey. S.A.C.);
Natal 1906, 1 clasp, 1906 (Wdr: F. W. Carey, Natal Police.)

Frederick William Carey enrolled in the Natal Police on 30 October 1896 and was discharged on 20 December 1900. He attested for the South African Constabulary on 1 January 1901, and was discharged on termination of his period of engagement, at Zeerust, on 31 December 1902.

Entitled to OFS (WO100/271p183) and Tr (WO100/271p79)
Dr David Biggins
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Medals to the Natal Police 1 year 2 months ago #78679

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Title: QSA Medal with one bar - White
Description: Full size medal mint condition issued to Natal police member

This BidorBuy lister does not make it easy.

From the picture, the QSA has clasp Natal.

There are several men on this name on the roll but 2058 Tpr R E White seems to be only one to receive just the Natal clasp.

Given the single picture, it is difficult to confirm the condition.


Picture courtesy of BidorBuy
Dr David Biggins
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