The regiment arrived in Natal from India before the war broke out. They took part in the battle of Elandslaagte on 21st October 1899l (see 1st Devonshire Regiment). The regiment was not present at Rietfontein, 24th October, but on the 30th in the battle of Lombard's Kop (see 1st Liverpool) they were engaged. Lieutenant Norwood gained the VC on that day for galloping back 300 yards for a wounded man, carrying him on his back, at the same time leading his horse, all under a heavy and incessant fire. After the investment of Ladysmith was complete the regiment was frequently engaged, particularly on 3rd November 1899 and on 6th January 1900, the day of the great attack (see 1st Devonshire Regiment and 1st Manchester Regiment). In his despatches of 2nd December 1899 and 23rd March 1900 General White mentioned 3 officers.

In the northern advance from Ladysmith to the Transvaal the 5th Dragoon Guards were brigaded with the 1st Royal Dragoons and 13th Hussars under Brigadier General Burn-Murdoch. When General Buller moved north towards Lydenburg from the Standerton line Burn-Murdoch's brigade was employed in the south-east of the Transvaal. In General Buller's final despatch of 9th November 1900 4 officers and 3 non-commissioned officers and men of the 5th Dragoon Guards were mentioned for gallant work while the regiment was under him, the cause of mention in the case of Captain Reynolds being, "on 15th August with a party of 20 men of the 5th Dragoon Guards surprised and routed a commando of 400".

In Lord Roberts' despatch of 4th September 1901 8 officers and 5 non-commissioned officers and men were mentioned.

In the first quarter of 1901 the regiment had arduous work in the south-east of the Transvaal while General French was driving Botha's forces into that angle. They frequently had skirmishing, but perhaps their hardest work was the escorting of convoys from the railway to French's men during a time when the weather scarcely ever faired up for weeks at a time, and the endless spruits could only be crossed with great difficulty. The regiment was afterwards taken to the Western Transvaal, and did much work in the Klerksdorp district. They were for a time in columns under Colonel Western and Brigadier General G Hamilton, and they afterwards operated under Brigadier General G Hamilton east of Pretoria. The regiment sailed for India shortly before peace was declared.

Three officers and 3 non-commissioned officers were mentioned in Lord Kitchener's final despatch.

Search:
Search Options:
(0 Records)

 Surname   Forename   No   Rank   Notes 
 
Please enter a search phrase...
 
Page 1 of 1

Only registered users can post comments