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American nurses on the hospital ship Maine 3 weeks 5 days ago #86920

  • BereniceUK
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FOR OUR WOUNDED.
The American Hospital Ship.
....In the course of a chat with the matron of the "Maine" a representative of "The Hospital Nursing Mirror" asked
...."Have any of the nurses worked under you before?"
...."We did not know each other till we met on board, but it was a pleasant arrangement that we should all cross together, because we had time to get accustomed to one another."
...."Are you all good sailors, because I suppose that is rather an important matter on board a hospital which is apt at times to roll a bit?"
...."Only one of us was at all affected by the motion, and she soon got accustomed to it. Personally, I was a little anxious about my sea-going powers, because, although I have crossed seven times, a year ago I had southern typhoid badly, and I was afraid lest the illness should have made me more easily upset. But I am glad to say I was perfectly well all the time."
...."Have all the nurses had war experience?"
...."Yes, all are army nurses, and three of them worked as Red Cross nurses in the late war between America and Spain. One was for some time at Porto Rico. The fourth, we feel, is in no way behind us in experience, because she was attached to the big ship at Bellevue, N.Y., and had the care of the soldiers as soon as they were able to be moved."
...."I infer that the nurses were specially selected because of their practical training?"
...."Certainly they were; but our system of Army Reserve nurses differs from yours. No nurse is admitted into our Reserve unless she has had four months' nursing with the Army. The consequence is that when hurses for the front are required we know that any selected from the Reserve will not be new to the work."
...."How many patients is the Maine supposed to accommodate?"
...."Not more than 200, unless absolutely necessary. In the latter case we should receive more, and shall have the additional cots on board ready to put up at a moment's notice; but we hoped not to be obliged to do so."
...."I hope, too, that the casualties will not be heavy enough to compel you to utilise your additional accommodation, but with only 56 nurses, which is given as the number employed by the Army in South Africa at present, do you not think pressure may come?"
...."Yes, remembering that in the Phillipines our staff was considerably over a hundred, I fear more help may be required later on."
...."Will the nurses wear the usual costume worn by the United States Army nurses?"
...."No, we wear white, but it has been thought advisable that a change should be made, and our dresses on board the Maine will be of army blue duck, our aprons of white duck, so that they will not easily tear, and white clerical collars and cuffs. These are made to button on, so that they are easily fixed. The cap is to be of a modified 'Red Cross' shape, the same as those worn by the nurses in the Presbyterian Hospital in New York. To show their sympathy with the English, the committee of that particular hospital have presented the nurses of the Maine with fifty caps."
...."What a useful gift. So that there will be no anxiety about clean caps for some time to come. Have you any idea how long your services will be required?"
...."Our engagement is for six months; and of course we shall make no other engagements as long as we are likely to be wanted."
...."Do you know where the Maine is likely to be stationed?"
...."Wherever the War Office thinks we shall be of most use."
...."I shall be glad if you will tell me something about your own career. You have had a great deal of experience in the nursing of soldiers, I believe?"
...."I joined the Army Nursing Service upon its foundation in 1897. Then, upon the outbreak of hostilities between the Spanish and Americans, I was placed at the head of the hospital in Savannah, where there were 75 trained nurses and over 1,000 beds. I was there for some months. I was also superintendent at the military camp at Jacksonville, where over 150 nurses were under my charge. Though there was a good deal of illness, we never lost a nurse all the time. Later I was on duty in the surgeon-general's office in Washington."
The Blackburn Standard, Saturday 16th December 1899
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American nurses on the hospital ship Maine 3 weeks 4 days ago #86938

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Dr David Biggins
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American nurses on the hospital ship Maine 3 weeks 4 days ago #86943

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Miss Warrender in the photo could well be Eleanor Warrender. By WW1 Lady Randolph Churchill (next to her in the photo) was describing Eleanor Warrender as being her friend.

See here, pages 116 to 120 - www.gutenberg.org/files/68257/68257-h/68257-h.htm#Page_115

Edit - Yes, it is her. inspirationalwomenofww1.blogspot.com/202...ender-1862-1949.html

I would guess that she's the matron interviewed, and her being British and being a nurse in the US Army Reserve could explain her crossing the Atlantic seven times.

Her grave - www.findagrave.com/memorial/60357185/eleanor-charles-warrender

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