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Lou, Frank, and Teddie Simes, Cinque Port Rifle Volunteers, Royal Sussex Regt. 1 year 11 months ago #61672

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Three brothers, two of whom died within four years of returning from South Africa, who volunteered, and served together, for the Active Service Company Royal Sussex Regiment.

Corporal Lewis Edward Simes - born December 1875, died 28th June 1904.
Private Francis Henry Simes - born June 1877.
Private Edwin Samuel Simes - born December 1881, died March 1905.
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"I doubt if even amongst the rolls of those who manned the King's ships and fought the King's battles during those centuries of eventful history could be found a more honourable entry than that in the "A" Company list of Volunteers for the Front, which records the names of the three brothers Simes, all of whom have been chosen for this expedition, and whose fourth brother would also have accompanied them had circumstances permitted him to do so...….

Hastings and St. Leonards Observer, Saturday 10th February 1900
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NAMES AND NUMBERS OF DETACHMENT.
"A" HASTINGS COMPANY. - 7,045, Corporal L. Simes; 7,070 Lance-Corporal J. Oak; 7,080 Lance-Corporal F. Unstead; 7,048 Private G. Bannister; 7,052 Private D. Down; 7,060 Private P [or possibly F.]. E. Jones; 7,072 Private S. Phillips; 7,075 Private E. S. Simes; 7,076 Private F. H. Simes; 7,078 Private W. E. Stent; 7,069 Private P. Oliver.

Hastings and St. Leonards Observer, Saturday 17th February 1900
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LETTER FROM PRIVATE E. S. SIMES.
Below are a few extracts of a letter from Private E. S. Simes, now in South Africa, which his brother, Mr. W. F. Simes, of 89, Emmanuel-road, Hastings, has just received:
"April 4th, 1900.
"Just a few lines to let you know I am still about. Sorry I did not write before. We had a good send-off from Southampton. The second day out some of our chaps were a bit seasick, but I'm glad to say it did not affect me. They put me on orderly duty again, which I think is a bit thick, as I had plenty of that at Chichester. I suppose they think I make a good general servant. We have to keep the things as clean as a new pin; but, taking it all round, I don't do so badly. It was a grand sight at Las Palmas to see all the natives in small boats swarming alongside of our ship, offering for sale all kinds of fruit, nuts, cigars, and cigarettes; enclosed are three orange-leaves, which came from Las Palmas. We saw the transport that ran ashore, with the Artillery and traction engines on board. The weather is grand, and the voyage very enjoyable. We have sports two or three times a week. I have been in hospital three days, through getting overheated, but am all right again now. That's the only fault of the weather, it's just a little bit too hot. One poor chap of the Somersetshire Regiment died, and was buried at sea. We arrived at Cape Town safely on Saturday morning, at seven o'clock, but laid in the bay all day. We turned out at 4.30 in the morning. Sunday, April 1st, we went alongside the wharf, and at dinnertime we left the Tintagel Castle, and went aboard the Winston Grange, which was like coming out of a palace and going into a cowshed; she is a dirty old cattle boat. Then our troubles began. The cook got drunk on Saturday night, and put some whitening in the bread, so we had to go on hard biscuits and stewed tea. Directly after breakfast they discovered
THE SHIP WAS ON FIRE.
The coal in the bunker had caught alight, so we had all to pack our traps and go on the Lake Erie for a makeshift until they put the fire out. We had mutton and potatoes for dinner, and hard biscuits for tea, and turned in about eight o'clock. About 11.30 the Captain came and roused eight of us up for fire duty - all 1st C.P.R.V. men, myself, Frank, and Lou being amongst them. They found us blue trousers and shirts, and we wore our own boots. We then went aboard the Winston Grange, which was lying alongside. Lou and Jim Oak were the first two to go down for an hour, myself and Banny taking the next turn. We had three hosepipes on, and we got soaked, and as black as the devil. All the time we were down there the niggers were working hard getting the coal out. You ought to see them at work with bare feet, tramping about on the hot coal; it did not seem to take any effect on them. We got the fire out about six o'clock the next morning. Then we went and had a bath, which we wanted very badly. After that we felt better, and had our breakfast - hard biscuits and tea. After dinner we had to shift all our kit on to the Winston Grange again. I can tell you it was a bit lively running from one ship to the other for your stuff. We are not so well fed now - bread for breakfast, and mutton for dinner, bread and tea; no butter or anything else; if you want butter you have to buy it. But never mind, I expect we shall get over it all right. We started for East London on Tuesday afternoon. The old boat rolls about like a cradle; she's got about three feet of weed on her bottom. Wednesday morning we had to scrub decks, which were covered with coal-dust, and as black as your hat. I have no more to write now; please remember me to all."

Hastings and St. Leonards Observer, Saturday 5th May 1900
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A CONTENTED HASTINGS VOLUNTEER.
We have received another letter from Private E. S. Simes, of the Sussex Volunteer Company, whose brother, Mr. W. F. Simes, lives at 89, Emmanuel-road, Hastings. A few extracts given below will be interesting to our readers. He says: "I forgot to tell you in my last letter that we had a march round Cape Town. After leaving Cape Town we went on by boat to East London, and from there on to Durban, where we stayed four days. We kept ourselves fit by marching round about Durban. Before leaving Durban to return to East London we took on board two Squadrons of Imperial Light Horse; they had been up round Ladysmith for five months, and said they had been having a very thick time of it. We left East London for Bloemfontein on Wednesday, April 19th, and stopped at several stations on the way up for tea, bread and butter, etc. On arriving at Springfontein, about 400 miles up country, we camped for one night, and left there the next evening at six o'clock for a place called Ferrera, which is about ten miles outside of Bloemfontein. Reached Ferrera April 22nd, and here joined our Regiment. There is fighting going on about ten miles from here. We are on outpost duty; picquets go out at three o'clock in the afternoon, and do not come in again until the next afternoon. Our rations are very good now; the days are very hot, and the nights very cold. Have just had a little bit of sport - one of our bullocks broke loose, and took it into his head to trot the country on his own, and started on his mad career across the fields, with a party of us in hot pursuit, and a warm time he gave us before we captured him. There are thousands of troops passing here, and a huge convoy, between three and four miles long, has just gone past. We are expecting orders at any minute to start for Bloemfontein. There is no mistake that we are seeing some grand sights, and I would not change my lot for any money."

Hastings and St. Leonards Observer, Saturday 26th May 1900
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IN WAR-STRICKEN SOUTH AFRICA.

WITH THE HASTINGS VOLUNTEERS.

HOT WORK AT ZAND RIVER.
Appended are some extracts from a letter by Corporal L. Simes, brother of Mr. W. F. Simes, of 89, Emmanuel-road, Hastings, to his shopmates, describing the part taken by the Volunteer Company at the Battle of Zand River. The youngest of the three brothers, Private E. S. Simes, was taken ill with dysentery at Kroonstad, and sent back to Bloemfontein, but a letter received from him on Monday last states that he is now quite well, and enjoying "the life of a gentleman, roaming over the hills in search of relics in the shape of pieces of shell and bullets."

Corporal Simes writes: "We left Winburg on the 6th for Kroonstad, but had a halt again until the 10th, when we had to turn out at three a.m., and cross the Zand River, which we waded through in water up to our waists. As soon as we got across the Boers commenced to pepper us, the bullets whizzing over our heads like hail, but still we pressed on, until we got under the shelter of a hill, and waited for supports to come up. We found the Boers were holding a very strong position on a hill about four miles from our Camp. In the advance to take this hill the Sussex and Derbys formed the fighting line, with the C.I.V.'s and the Camerons as supports, the Cavalry being on our flanks. The Artillery were in the rear, and covered the attack by shelling the hill, with good effect. We advanced in extended order, covering a front of about 1½ miles. The whole of the time we were exposed to a very heavy but erratic fire, and finally captured the position, about 11.30. Our Company took seven prisoners, with horses and rifles. The casualties in our Regiment were three killed and eight wounded. Luckily, our Company got through without a scratch. The Boer prisoners said that Steyn told them that Lord Kitchener had been killed, and Lord Roberts was severely wounded, and thousands of the British troops had been killed. That night we camped about eight miles from a place called Ventersburg, where we rested until about twelve o'clock the next day. We then started on a 20-mile march towards Kroonstad. After covering that distance we halted, and our Company had to go on picquet duty, without tea or anything else, and a jolly cold night it was. Twenty-five Boers, with rifles and ammunition, surrendered during the night. We started again the next morning at nine o'clock, and marched ten miles, then halted for three hours, then on again for another eight miles, and halted about 2½ miles outside of Kroonstad. We heard on the way that General French had already occupied the town. We are now having a little rest, which I think we have earned. We have left about thirty of our fellows behind with dysentery, sore feet, etc., there being nine out of my Section alone. We have been on short rations for several days now, and have bivouacked out for about a fortnight. It feels a bit rough, although the weather has been fine the whole of the time.

Hastings and St. Leonards Observer, Saturday 14th July 1900
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THE BATTLE OF RETIEF'S NEK.

"A HELL OF FIRE."
Private E. Goodwin, also a member of the local Volunteer Detachment at the Front, writes to his mother and father from Retief's Nek. Describing the action fought there, he says: "We formed up for the attack, and advanced, from behind a big kopje, up to about 600 or 700 yards, under a hell of fire. It was awful, and we kept going forward and firing, but could not see a single Boer until we had lain there for about two hours. The bullets were flying all round us like a hailstorm. I can tell you it made me think of home, and my heart ached to see the poor fellows falling on all sides. About 3.30 our Captain was hurt, and it was awful to hear him groan. Frank Simes (another Hastings Volunteer) and I ran along and carried him out of the firing line, and laid him in a hole under cover. The fire was awful when we were carrying him. When the stretcher-bearers came up, with General Montgomery, he told us to get further away, as we were drawing the fire, but I could see it was all up with him. It was a day one could never forget. I expected every minute my last moment had come. I fired 140 rounds of ammunition during the afternoon.

Hastings and St. Leonards Observer, Saturday 15th September 1900
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GALLANTRY OF HASTINGS VOLUNTEERS.

THREE TO HAVE THE D.C.M.
Mr. and Mrs. F. Goodwin have received a most interesting letter from their son, a Private serving with the local Volunteers at the Front, dated Kroonstad, August 19th. The following are extracts therefrom: - "I shall never forget the fight at Retief's Nek. I and Frank Simes (also a Hastings man) have been recommended for the Distinguished Conduct Medal for bringing our late Captain, Sir Walter Bartelott, out of a murderous fire at that battle. Sergt. Ross (another Hastings man) has also had the same recommendation for dressing our Lieutenant's wounds in the retiring. We are all three Hastingsers - a stroke of luck, is it not?"

Hastings and St. Leonards Observer, Saturday 22nd September 1900
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A DISTINGUISHED VOLUNTEER.
Private T. Simes, of the Volunteer Company at the Front, brother of the writer of above letter, who, it will be remembered, gained distinction by carrying the late Captain Sir Walter Barttelot to a place of safety after he had been mortally wounded, has also sent home a letter, in which he says he is well, and having a fairly good time at Bloemfontein.

Hastings and St. Leonards Observer, Saturday 5th January 1901
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FIGHTING VOLUNTEER PROMOTED.
A Battalion order has just been issued by Lieut.-Col. Richardson, commanding the 1st C.P.R.V., containing notice of several promotions, and amongst them is the name of Corporal Simes, to be Sergeant (Supernumary), in "A" Company. He is now in South Africa, with the other Hastings Volunteers.

Hastings and St. Leonards Observer, Saturday 19th January 1901
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Extracts from the Hastings and St. Leonards Observer's report of the return of the 1st Battalion Cinque Port Rifle Volunteers to Hastings, on Wednesday 13th June 1901: -

"Lance-Corporal Frank H. Simes and Private E. Goodwin were recommended for the Distinguished Service Medal for their courage in carrying Major Sir Walter G. Barttelot out of the firing line when that gallant officer was mortally wounded. He thanked them with his dying breath. They were privately presented to Lady Barttelot, and fulfilled the sad duty of communicating to her the details of the Major's last moments."

"Lance-Corporal F. H. Simes…..has returned with his brother, Private E. Simes, both being in excellent health. Their brother, Corporal L. Simes, was seized with dysentery just before coming home, and consequently returned in a hospital ship, landing at Woolwich on Tuesday morning. He has now recovered, and was expected home yesterday (Friday) or to-day.

Hastings and St. Leonards Observer, Saturday 15th June 1901
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A KHAKI SUPPER.
A supper and smoking concert was held at Hill-street, Host S. Heathfield, to welcome some five of the Active Service Company, who are members of the Heathfield Harmonic Society. Mr. F. Simes, sen., presiding with Mr.Phillimore in the vice-chair, supported by Corporal Simes, Corporal Oak, Corporal Martin, Lance-Corporal Simes, Private E. Simes, Private Bannister, and Private Jones, of the Active Service Company of the 1st C.P.R.V. A good repast was provided by the host. After supper, a capital smoking concert was carried out. - The Chairman proposed "The Active Service Company," which was received with applause, Corporal Simes responding, amid cheers. He thanked the members on behalf of his comrades for the kind reception that evening, and was very pleased to be amongst them again. - The others also responded. Songs were contributed by Mr. Prince, Private Bannister, Mr. Pierce, Mr. Gallop, Lance-Corporal Simes, Mr. Stace, Private E. Simes, Mr. Heathfield, Mr. W. Simes, and Mr. Venner. The evening closed with a vote of thanks to the Chairman and Vice-Chairman, with musical honours.

Hastings and St. Leonards Observer, Saturday 29th June 1901
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The London Gazette, 10th September 1901, reported that 7076 Lance-Corporal F. H. Symes, Volunteer Company Royal Sussex Regiment, had been mentioned in despatches.
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Sergeant L. Simes, and Privates E. S. Simes and F. H. Simes, were amongst the men of the 1st C.P.R.V., and the Volunteers of the Royal Sussex Regiment, who had served in South Africa, who received their medals on Saturday 16th November, at the Royal Pavilion, Brighton.

Hastings and St. Leonards Observer, Saturday 23rd November 1901
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HELPING A LOCAL WAR HERO.

SMITTEN WITH DISEASE.
On Wednesday evening a very successful benefit concert was given at the Whitefriars Hotel, West Hill, in aid of Sergeant L. Simes, of the 1st Contingent Active Service Company, 1st C.P.R.V.

Sergeant Simes went to the Front, and was invalided home, and has since been unable to follow his employment through continued ill health.

There was a crowded attendance. Mr. W. Richards presided, and Mr. J. H. Prior occupied the vice-chair.

An enjoyable musical programme was carried out, Messrs. W. Fielder and C. Winter ably acting as accompanists. A piano duet was given by Messrs. Winter and Chapman, and a trombone solo by Mr. G. Blackford. Mr. F. Parncott pleased with "The Lifeboatman's Story," and later "My Dear Old Dutch." Mr. Venner gave an excellent rendering of "Motherland," and Mr. Alfred gave some "Dear Home" songs. The comic element was supplied by Mr. Joe Fuller, Drummer Hermitage and Mr. Bannister. Messrs. H. Haste and Foster gave a highly appreciated duet. One of the most interesting items of the evening was a solo given on a Japanese violin by Mr. Page.

The arrangements were carried out by a Committee, with Mr. C. Fisher (treasurer) and Mr. H. Hughes (secretary).

After a collection had been taken the Chairman, in a complimentary speech, alluded to the life and general good character of Sergeant Simes, and announced that after expenses had been paid £12 15s. 9d. would be handed over. (Applause.) He wished to thank the Committee, who had made the gathering such a success, and also Messrs. F. J. Parsons, Ltd., who had printed the programmes free of charge, and likewise Mr. Fisher for lending his room. (Applause.)

Hastings and St. Leonards Observer, Saturday 13th December 1902
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On Tuesday 12th January 1904 a memorial roll of honour was unveiled in the Council Chamber, Hastings Town Hall, recording the names of men who went out to South Africa from Hastings and St.Leonards; the three brothers are all named on the plaque.

Hastings and St. Leonards Observer, Saturday 16th January 1904
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BENEFIT FOR A VOLUNTEER . - It is hoped there will be a large attendance at a benefit concert to be held at the Granville Hotel on Monday evening next at eight o'clock, in aid of Mr. E. S. Simes, late private in the 1st C.P.R.V. He volunteered for South Africa in March, 1900, and after taking part in several engagements fell sick at Kroonstad. He was in hospital three months, but rejoining the regiment he took part in the marches after De Wet until he again fell sick of dysentery and enteric. Ever since his return he has been ill and unable to follow regular employment. He has a medal and three clasps.

Hastings and St. Leonards Observer, Saturday 19th November 1904
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RIFLE EX-SERGEANT'S DEATH

A HASTINGS VOLUNTEER FOR SOUTH AFRICA.

HEALTH BROKEN AT THE WAR.

We regret to record the death of Mr. Lewis Edward Simes, of 89, Emmanuel-road, an ex-sergeant in the 1st Cinque Ports Rifle Volunteers, and one of those who volunteered for service during the South African War.

The sad event took place on Tuesday afternoon about five o'clock. Mr. Simes, who was only 29 years of age, contracted enteric fever and dysentery when at Bloemfontein, and had never recovered his previous good health. The cause of death was consumption.

Mr. Simes joined the Hastings Rifles in May, 1891, and was with them 12 years, also seeing service with the Royal Sussex in South Africa for about 18 months. He resigned some months ago on account of his health. An illuminated discharge certificate, signed by Colonel Café and Captain Wisden, testified to his efficiency. He was
A CRACK SHOT.
For two years running he won the second prize in the money match, and he was generally among those who represented his Corps in the team matches.

When in South Africa he marched about 1,200 miles on foot, and was without a tent to sleep in for eighteen weeks. He was in the engagements at Welkom Farm, Sand River, Doornkop, Diamond Hill, and Retief's Nek, and received a medal and four clasps. He escaped unhurt until he was seized with illness when on outpost duty at Bloemfontein, and even then he would not go into hospital till he was absolutely obliged. He was in hospital two months, and came home in a hospital ship. It was while he was in South Africa that he received his sergeant's stripes. He had been home about three years, and was a carpenter by trade.

Mr. Frank Simes, a brother of the deceased, was in South Africa with him, and was mentioned in despatches for conspicuous bravery at Retief's Nek. Another brother, Mr. Edward Simes, also took part in the War, and has, unfortunately, been in bad health since his return to Hastings.
"A THOROUGH SOLDIER"
was the description given of the deceased by those who knew him. In his last illness, when his mind wandered through weakness, he constantly recurred to his military duties.

Mr. Simes, who was a single man, leaves a mother, five brothers, and four sisters to mourn their loss.

The funeral takes place this (Saturday) afternoon at the Borough Cemetery at 3.15. The body will be borne by six of the deceased's comrades who were with him in South Africa.

Hastings and St. Leonards Observer, Saturday 2nd July 1904
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EX -SERGEANT'S FUNERAL . - The funeral of Mr. Lewis Edward Simes, whose death was reported in our previous issue, was held on Saturday afternoon, at the Borough Cemetery. The coffin, which was of polished elm with brass fittings, was covered with beautiful wreaths from the members of the deceased's family and friends. Specially noticeable were wreaths from the Sergeants' Mess of the 1st C.P.R.V., "With deepest sympathy" and one from his late comrades in the South African War. There were six bearers, Corporal Martin, Privates G. Bannister, H. Gallop, S. Phillips, E. Goodwin, and Bugler Dunk, comrades of the deceased in South Africa. The Rev. H. H. Breton officiated. There was a large number of friends by the graveside, including: - Q.M.S. Kerswell, Sergt. Pattenden, Messrs. Goodwin, T. Bumstead, and W. Stapely, and Private F. Jones, etc. The mourners were Mrs. Simes (mother), Messrs. T. Simes, E. Simes, F. Simes, W. Simes, Edward Simes, and V. Simes (brothers), Mrs. Venner (sister), Mrs. W. Simes, and Mrs. T. Simes (sisters-in-law), Mr. J. Venner (brother-in-law), Miss C. Betts, and Messrs. J. and F. Simes (uncles), etc. Mrs. Emma Simes, the deceased's mother, wishes to thank her many friends for their kindness in her bereavement, and the members of the Active Service Company of the 1st C.P.R.V. for their sympathy and presence at the funeral.

Hastings and St. Leonards Observer, Saturday 9th July 1904
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This is the only published letter home from Frank Simes, and I'm adding it at the end as it doesn't really fit in with everything else.

HASTINGS VOLUNTEER MARCHES.

THE DISTANCES COVERED.
Private Frank Simes, one of three brothers from Hastings, with the Sussex Volunteer Company in South Africa, has sent home to his brother, who is a bandsman in the 1st C.P.R.V. at Hastings, a very interesting letter, setting forth the marches and engagements in which the Volunteers have taken part. The Royal Sussex Regiment formed part of the 21st Brigade, commanded by General Bruce Hamilton, which was attached to the Winburg column (General Ian Hamilton). the effective strength of the column at the start, on April 22nd, was 11,000 men, 4,600 horses, 36 field guns, 23 machine guns, two five-inch guns, and six pom-poms. The list of towns captured by the Winburg column comprises Thabanchu, Ventersburg, Winburg, Kroonstad, Lindley, Heilbron, Johannesburg, Pretoria, Heidelberg, Frankfort, and Reitz.

The following is a list of places camped at and the number of miles marched by the Volunteer Company: - April - 27th, Ferreira to Bloemfontein, 8 miles; 28th, Glen, 15; 29th, Klein O. Spruit, 8; 30th, Schantz Kraal, 7. May - 1st, Jacobspruit, 17; 3rd, Isabelfontein, 14; 4th, Welkon Farm, 12; 5th, Winburg, 15; 6th, Dankbarfontein, 8; 6th, Bloemplatz, 12; a10th, Erasmus Spruit (Zand River), 10; 11th, Twistnest, 13; 12th, Kroonspruit, 17; 15th, Kroonspruit Luid, 6; 16th, Leeuwpoort, 12; 17th, Doorn Kloof, 15; 18th, Lindley, 15; 20th, Kareespruit, 15; 21st, Witport, 17; 22nd, Heilbron, 10; 23rd, Elandspruit, 9; 24th, Elipimn, 14; 25th, Wonderheuvel, 7; 26th, Wonderwater, 14; 27th, Reitspruit, 17; 28th, Spyfontein, 9; a28th, Doorn Kop, 18; 30th, Florida, 5. From May 20th to May 30th, there were eleven consecutive days' marching, the distance being 135 miles.

June - 1st, Branfontein, 5; 3rd, Deepsluel, 15; 4th, Six Mile Spruit, 14; 5th, Pretoria, 12; 6th, Irene, 12; 8th, Garsfontein, 8; a11th, Boschkop Farm, 12; a12th, Kleinfontein (Diamond Hill), 8; 13th, Elands River Station, 8; 15th, Schwarz Kopje, 12; 16th, Pretoria, 12; 19th, Irene, 12; 20th, Valkfontein, 14; 21st, Springs, 14; 22nd, Grootfontein, 10; 23rd, Heidelberg, 7; 27th, Moddersfontein, 12; 28th, Bierlaagte, 11; 29th, Villersdorp, 17; 30th, Alemans Home, 7.

July - 1st, Frankfort, 11; 4th, Reitfontein, 9; 5th, Sarce, 20; 6th, Storn Kop, 11; 7th, Reitz, 5; 13th, Hartebeestepock, 12; 14th, Leeuwspruit, 15; 16th, Sebastopol Farm (via Bethlehem), 12; 17th, Meyers Kop, 5; a23rd, Retief's Nek, 14; 24th, Boshop Farm, 6; 25th, South End of Retief's Nek, 1; 27th, Hebron, 12; 28th, Groendraai, 15; 29th, Stephanus Draai, 12; 30th, Over drift and reconnaissance, 2; 31st, Klersobei, 3; 3rd, Weltevieden, 15; 4th, Roodspoort, 14; 5th, Bethlehem, 18. From July 27th to August 5th, ten consecutive days, the distance marched was 103 miles.

7th, Moorgenster, 14; 8th, Luring Krans, 14; 9th, Senekal, 15; 10th, Vaal Kop, 11; 11th, Kareebank, 11; 12th, Winburg, 15; 15th, Klepfontein, 8; 16th, Merriesfontein, 15; 17th, Rietspruit, 12; 18th, Holtfontein, 15; 19th, Kornspruit, 11; 20th, Kroonstad, 7; 22nd, Geneva Siding, 12; 25th, Winburg by railway; 26th, Helpmakaar and back, 19; 31st, Bloemfontein by rail, and marched to camp, 2.

September 1st, Sannas Post, 22; 2nd, near Thabanchu, 19; 3rd, Thabanchu East and Andriesfontein, 20; 4th, Gelak, 13; 5th, towards Ladybrand and back, 11; 6th, Leeuw River, 6. From September 1st to September 6th, six consecutive days, the distance marched was 91 miles.

September - 12th, Brandrift, 11 miles; 13th, Lamen Romst, 11; 14th, Allendale, 12; 15th, Klepfontein Bridge and Klein Saxony, 21; 16th, Marais Farm, 5; 17th, Rooi Kraal, 13; 18th, Herfontein, 10; 19th, Welgevredo, 11; 20th, Senekal, 11' From September 12th to September 20th, nine consecutive days, the distance marched was 105 miles.

September - 23rd, Zand River Drift, 13 miles; 24th, Krnisfontein, 12; 25th, Withkopje, 3; 26th, Lindley, 9; 28th, ten miles to north of Lindley, 10; 29th, (a), ditto, return to Lindley, 10. November - 19th, 16 miles from Lindley, 16; 20th, Wilport, 16; 21st, Heilbron, 10; 22nd, Gottenberg Halt, 14; 23rd, Wolvehoek, 13; 24th, 25th, and 26th, from Wolvehoek to Bloemfontein by train. Total marched from April 27th to November 23rd, 1,288 miles.

a Indicates actions in which the Sussex Regiment, including the Volunteer Company, were in the firing line.

Hastings and St. Leonards Observer, Saturday 5th January 1901
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Lou, Frank, and Teddie Simes, Cinque Port Rifle Volunteers, Royal Sussex Regt. 1 year 11 months ago #61684

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Fantastic research, Berenice and great presentation.
Dr David Biggins

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Lou, Frank, and Teddie Simes, Cinque Port Rifle Volunteers, Royal Sussex Regt. 1 year 11 months ago #61698

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Thanks, David. I do enjoy searching for the newspaper reports.

I forgot to include a couple of photos.

The Active Service Contingent of the Cinque Port Rifle Volunteers, before leaving for the front. The original photo was taken by Mr J. H. Blomfield, Hastings.



Some of the Volunteers photographed at Southampton, after arriving back in England, including Frank and Teddie Simes, S. (possibly Sid) Phillips, George 'Banny' Bannister, E. (Teddy) Goodwin, and William Goodwin. The photo appears to have been cut down from a larger one, as there's half a man on the left, and the right hand of another man on the right. (Hasting and St Leonards Observer, Saturday 15th June 1901)

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Lou, Frank, and Teddie Simes, Cinque Port Rifle Volunteers, Royal Sussex Regt. 2 months 3 weeks ago #71497

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Berenice

Thank you for thisthread. I am researching the life of Sir Walter Barttelot for "The Organ Project" of The Portsea Parish. He is one of the Boer War casualties named in the organ screen which was erected as a memorial to a small number of casualties from that war. Two were local to Portsmouth, and two others were related to the family of W H Smith and his son and widow. W H Smith had provided most of the funds for the rebuilding of the parish church St Mary's Portsea. I am still trying to find Barttelot's connection with the parish or the other donors. There is a great deal of local material still to be examined, which I am slowly working through.
keith

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