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Medals to Damant's Horse / Rimmington's Guides 6 years 5 months ago #20456

  • Frank Kelley
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Hello David,
To be quite frank, I actually think any medal to anyone who had served before or indeed after the 21st of September 1901, irrespective of clasp combination, is well worth having.
Regards Frank

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Medals to Damant's Horse / Rimmington's Guides 6 years 5 months ago #20458

  • djb
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I wouldn't disagree with that Frank.
Dr David Biggins

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Medals to Damant's Horse / Rimmington's Guides 6 years 5 months ago #20473

  • SWB
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Hello

I published an update to that article in the SAMHS journal in 2012:

The ten-clasp QSA mystery resolved
Military History Journal (South African Military History Society) vol 125 No 5 June 2012

To answer Jim's question:

"In addition Duxbury published a list of 98 men who earned the 8 clasp medal with Rimington's Guides like Wilson, two earned the Belfast clasp instead of Wittebergen. On reviewing the list against the medal roll two men are missing: Trpr ED Forster and Sgt CV Foster. This brings the total to 100 which neatly coincides with Stirling; in November 1899 the “corps numbered about 150..many were detached to act as guides..only about 100 remained with their leader” (Stirling p 151, reprint 1990)"

Regards
Meurig

djb wrote: Jim,

This article would suggest there are quite a few.

samilitaryhistory.org/vol023gd.html

Best wishes
David

Researcher & Collector
The Register of the Anglo-Boer Wars 1899-1902
theangloboerwars.blogspot.co.uk/
www.facebook.com/boerwarregister

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Medals to Damant's Horse / Rimmington's Guides 6 years 5 months ago #20475

  • Henk Loots
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Hi everybody




George Hamilton Attwell didn't make it for 8 Battle Bars : he did not qualify for Wittebergen.

He joined Rimington's Guides on 14 )ct0ber 1899, 2 days after formation of the unit. He was discharged at Pretoria on 18 June 1900 and subsequently joined the Field Intelligence Department, earning the SA'01 bar.

Henk
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Medals to Damant's Horse / Rimmington's Guides 6 years 5 months ago #20476

  • JustinLDavies
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This is the pair to Lieutenant C.R. De La Porte that I sold at DNW some ten years ago. He had the maximum possible ten clasps. So the follow up question to Meurig's post is 'how many of the Tigers got a total of 10 clasps'?

All best,

Justin






Footnote
Richard De La Porte enlisted in Major Rimington’s Corps of Guides in October 1899, aged 25 years, stating that he had experience in using explosives. Advanced to Corporal in January 1900 and to Sergeant in September of the same year, he was wounded in action on the 25th of the latter month. De La Porte was discharged from Rimington’s Guides at Cape Town in May 1901, having attained the rank of Sergeant-Major, and subsequently gained a commission in the Field Intelligence Department.

In 1902 Lieutenant De La Porte was recommended for the Distinguished Service Order for the following deeds but, instead, received a mention in despatches (London Gazette 29 July 1902):

‘For general brave, good and reliable work in all ranks of Rimington’s Guides, and afterwards as Intelligence Agent and Intelligence Officer, all through the War, and particularly on 20 November 1901, when, by his quickness and initiative, Commandant Buys, who was being taken away wounded in a cape-cart from the fight near Villiersdorp, was taken prisoner; and on the night of 23 February 1901, when he was with Colonel Cox, N.S.W.M.R., in the action on the Hol Spruit, and assisted him in checking the Boers who broke through the picquet-line and prevented them from further rolling up the picquets. He was severely wounded in attempting to capture Boers in October [actually 25 September] 1900’ (War Office records refer).

Rimington’s Guides were an elite unit, some 150 strong, raised at the outbreak of the war by Major M. F. Rimington, Inniskilling Dragoons. It was comprised of experienced colonials who knew the country and shot superbly. Stirling records that, ‘As far as numbers go they were not strong, but for quality, officers and men could not be surpassed’ (The Colonials in South Africa refers). This aura of elitism was reinforced by the name commonly used by the other troops in South Africa, Rimington’s “Tigers”, owing to the band of leopard skin they wore around their slouch hats.

Rimington’s “Tigers” did more fighting in the early weeks of the war than any other unit. After undertaking an expedition to Prieska in November 1899 to quell a potential rebellion, they joined Lord Methuen’s force and scouted the ground and conducted fighting patrols prior to the battle of Belmont on 23 November. ‘The corps was present at that battle on the extreme right; at Enslin or Graspan on the 25th, again on the right; at Modder River on the 28th, on the left, being among the first troops to cross the river; at Magersfontein on 10th and 11th December, again on the left’ (Stirling). In January 1900 De la Porte’s squadron fought at Colesberg and Kleinfontein before they were brought up to the Modder River to play a major mounted role in Lord Roberts’ push towards Pretoria. They accompanied General French in the rush to Kimberley. Rimington’s “Tigers” marched to Bloemfontein, fought at Paardeberg, Poplar Grove and Driefontein. They were involved in the action at Sanna’s Post, the capture of Brandfort, the battles of Doornkop, Diamond Hill and the Brandwater Basin, the occupations of Pretoria and Johannesburg. In the early stages of the guerrilla war they were often attached to columns and scouts and guides.

In early 1901, the “Tigers” were paid off after Major Rimington was promoted to command a column. One of the squadron commanders, Major Damant was requested by Lord Kitchener to form a successor unit. It was named Damant’s Horse. By one of those odd quirks of fate that sometimes occur, the medal rolls of Rimington’s Guides and Damant’s Horse were combined under the title Damant’s Horse. When the Medals were issued the original “Tigers” found that all the medals were named to Damant’s Horse and not, where applicable, Rimington’s Guides. Given the history and corps d’esprit of “Mike” Rimington’s “Tigers” it is no small surprise that many of them, De la Porte included, had ‘Damant’s Horse’ erased from their Medal and ‘Rimington’s Guides’ engraved in its stead.
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Medals to Damant's Horse / Rimmington's Guides 6 years 5 months ago #20478

  • Wombat
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I have both the articles that have been mentioned, and I must say that they are both interesting reading, but I especially enjoyed the article on the 10 bar QSA.
If anyone needs a copy I am happy to send them a scan.
Or maybe permission could be sought for the articles to be posted on the forum.
I have a number of Damant's Horse chaps in my collection, but sadly parted with my 8 bar quite a while ago. The chap who bought it couldn't wait to gloat that he had also acquired the 2 bar KSA to go with it.
The last Damant's Horse I picked up had the bar Transvaal, so I set about getting his papers, and found that he had joined up on the 20th May 1902. You can imagine my disappointment at finding he only had 11 days service before the signing of the Armistice. That must be some sort of record.
After the Armistice was signed he went out chasing the bitter enders with those who either didn't know the War was over,or those who didn't want to know the War was over.
He is also entitled to the 02 bar.

James.

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