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Medals to the Manchester Regiment 2 months 1 week ago #95380

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QSA (2) Relief of Kimberley, Paardeberg (4498 Pte. A. Gregory. Manch: Regt.);
1914 Star, with clasp (4498 L.Cpl. J. [sic] Gregory. 2/Manch. R.);
British War and Victory Medals (4498. Pte. A. Gregory. Manch. R.);
Army LS&GC GV, 1st issue (4498 L. Cpl. A. Gregory. Manch: Regt.)

Arthur (alias James) Gregory attested for service in the 1st Battalion the Manchester Regiment at Ashton Under Lyne on 19 December 1894 at the age of 18. In 1896 he was posted to 2nd Battalion for service in India at Dinapur and Bombay, returning to the U.K. in December 1898. He was detached from his regiment in South Africa for service in the Mounted Infantry, where he contracted enteric fever in May 1900, and was evacuated to the U.K. Following the South African War he was appointed Lance-Corporal and rejoined the 1st Battalion of his regiment serving in Singapore, India, Ireland and at the regimental depot at Ashton Under Lyne.

He was awarded the Long Service and Good Conduct Medal in per Army Order No. 177 of April 1913.

Following the outbreak of the Great War Gregory went to France, landing with 2nd Battalion on 15 August 1914. On 14 September 1914 he was officially reported as missing but later reported by the regiment to having been taken prisoner at St. Quentin on 2 September 1914, though War Office records indicate that this should be Le Cateau. He was initially a Prisoner of War at Munster III camp, but was later interned in Holland. He was reported as no longer in enemy hands and repatriated to King George’s Hospital, Stamford, on 12 October 1918, and was discharged from the army on 5 February 1919, aged 42.
Dr David Biggins
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Medals to the Manchester Regiment 2 months 1 week ago #95381

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QSA (3) Defence of Ladysmith, Laing’s Nek, Belfast (3830 Pte. C. Buxton. Manchester Regt.);
KSA (2) (3830 Pte. C. Buxton. Manch: Regt.)

Charles Buxton was born in Dukinfield, Cheshire, on 12 November 1875 and attested for service in the Manchester Regiment at Ashton Under Lyne on 10 March 1893. He joined the 1st Battalion in Limerick four days later, and on 15 July 1896 he was awarded his ‘Mounted Infantry Certificate’. His battalion landed in Cape Town on 16 September 1899, and he was among those of his regiment who took part in the Defence of Ladysmith at Caesar’s Camp, before he returned to the U.K. and was demobilised on 11 September 1902. He is additionally entitled to the Orange Free State clasp, from a supplementary medal roll, which was authorised after he had left the army.

He died in 1948, at the age of 73.
Dr David Biggins
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Medals to the Manchester Regiment 2 months 1 week ago #95382

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QSA (4) Cape Colony, Transvaal, Wittebergen, South Africa 1901, unofficial rivets between third and fourth clasps (2719 Pte. J. Donnelly. Manchester Regt.);
1914-15 Star (2533 Pte. J. P. Donnelly. Manch. R.);
British War and Victory Medals (2533 Pte. J. P. Donnelly. Manch. R.)

John Patrick Donnelly was born at Manchester in 1871 and attested for service in 1st Battalion the Manchester Regiment at Ashton Under Lyne on 21 October 1889. He served in Ireland until he was posted to 2nd Battalion for service in India in 1891, and in October 1897 he returned to the U.K. and was discharged to the Army Reserve having completed eight years with the Colours. He was recalled for service in December 1899, and landed in South Africa on 9 April 1900, serving in the South African campaign with 2nd Battalion until he was invalided home in April 1901, and was discharged on 30 April 1902.

Donnelly re-enlisted following the outbreak of the Great War and was posted to 3rd (Reserve) Battalion. He was posted to France for service with 1st Battalion on 20 April 1915, and was appointed unpaid Lance Corporal. He was later transferred to 2nd Battalion serving in France and Belgium. He was discharged to pension on 10 April 1919 at the age of 48.
Dr David Biggins
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Medals to the Manchester Regiment 2 months 1 week ago #95383

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QSA (3) Tugela Heights, Relief of Ladysmith, Belfast (3195 Pte. J. E. Hawkyard. Manch: Regt.);
KSA (2) (3195 Pte. J. Hawkyard. Manch: Regt.)

John Edward Hawkyard was born at New Mills, Derbyshire, in 1874 and attested for service as a Private in the Manchester Regiment at Ashton Under Lyne on 30 March 1891, declaring prior service in the 2nd Volunteer Battalion of the Derbyshire Regiment. He served in Ireland and later transferred to 2nd Battalion for service in India. He returned to the UK and was discharged to the Army Reserve ‘time expired’ on 6 December 1898. He was recalled for service in the South African War, and posted to join 1st Battalion, then under siege at Ladysmith. He joined the Ladysmith Relief Column in December 1899, subsequently joining his battalion and serving in South Africa until he returned to the U.K. on 5 August 1902, the medal roll notes that at some time he served with ‘8th Bearer Company’. He was discharged from the regimental depot at Ashton Under Lyne on 29 March 1903.
Dr David Biggins
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Medals to the Manchester Regiment 2 months 1 week ago #95384

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QSA (4) Cape Colony, Transvaal, Wittebergen, South Africa 1901, unofficial rivets between third and fourth clasps, with clasp facings a little distorted (2376 Pte. J. Hopkins. Manch: Regt.);
Royal Humane Society, small bronze medal (successful) (John Hopkins. 13 December 1885) the medal silvered and lacking integral top riband buckle

John Hopkins was born at Stalybridge, Lancashire, about September 1870. At the age of 16 he was a mill worker, residing at Caroline Street, Stalybridge. On Sunday 13 December 1885 several persons had ventured on to the ice at the local mill reservoir, known as Chadwick Dams. 13-year-old Levi Gawthorp fell through the ice when skating; at great personal danger John Hopkins crawled on to the ice on his stomach and helped him out of the water. The local Stalybridge Reporter of 19 December reported on the incident and stated that the rescue deserved public recognition. John Hopkins’s bravery was recognised by the award of the Royal Humane Society and he was awarded the society’s medal in bronze. (R.H.S. Case No. 22,978).

At the age of 18, John Hopkins attested for service in the Manchester Regiment at Ashton Under Lyne on 1 October 1888, stating prior service in the 3rd (Militia) Battalion of the Royal Lancaster Regiment. In February 1892 he transferred to the 2nd Battalion of his regiment and embarked for India. He returned to the U.K. at the end of his period of service and was transferred to the Army Reserve. However, he reenlisted on 7 July 1898, and was posted back to 2nd Battalion. His battalion was mobilised for service in the South African War and embarked from Southampton on 16 March 1900. Private Hopkins returned to the U.K., arriving on 24 October 1901, and was discharged from the army, medically unfit, on 2 April 1902.

Hopkins volunteered for service following the outbreak of the Great War at the age of 44 years, serving at ‘home’ in 3/5th Battalion King’s Regiment and later 315 Provisional Company Royal Defence Corps, until discharged on 10 October 1916 ‘no longer physically fit for war service’.
Dr David Biggins
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Medals to the Manchester Regiment 2 months 1 week ago #95385

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QSA (3) Cape Colony, Transvaal, Wittebergen (5475 Corl. A. E. Hutchinson. Manch: Regt.);
KSA (2) (5475 Corpl. J. [sic] Hutchinson. Manch. Regt.);
1914 Star (5475 Pte. A. E. Hutchinson. 1/Manch. R.);
British War and Victory Medals (5475 Pte. A. E. Hutchinson. Manch. R.)

Albert Edward Hutchinson was born in Sheffield, Yorkshire, in February 1880 and attested for service in the Manchester Regiment at Ashton Under Lyne on 3 October 1898. He was posted to the 2nd Battalion, and on the outbreak of the South African War he was chosen for one of those to serve in the Mounted Infantry Company attached to 14th Battalion Mounted Infantry, holding the rank of Corporal. He was reported as severely wounded at Tweefontein on 5 May 1901, when serving in the Mounted Infantry. On the cessation of hostilities he was posted back to the 1st Battalion of his regiment and reverted to the rank of Private.

In 1904 Hutchinson was posted back to 2nd Battalion, and was transferred to the Army Reserve in October 1906. On 9 August 1914 he was recalled for service in 1st Battalion the Manchester Regiment and embarked for Le Havre on 13 November 1914. He joined his battalion in the trenches in early December 1914. On 20 December his battalion was ordered to retake the village of Givenchy, and Hutchinson was one of those who was reported as missing in action on Christmas Day 1914. He was later reported as killed in action on 21 December 1914; however, this report was false, as in May 1915 he was confirmed as a Prisoner of War at the German camp at Wittenberg, having been shot in the arm and taken prisoner in the action at Givenchy. Unusually, at some stage whilst still in captivity, he was sent to Switzerland for an operation on his left arm and elbow, and he was repatriated to England on 15 September 1915. He was discharged ‘no longer physically fit for active service’ on 31 January 1918.

Sold with a fascinating typescript copy memoir by the recipient titled ‘A True Story of my captivity in the Hands of the Huns’;
Dr David Biggins
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