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Medals to the CIV 1 year 3 months ago #71231

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QSA (4) Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Johannesburg, Diamond Hill (914 Cpl. H. W. Buckle, C.I.V.);
Volunteer Force Long Service Medal, E.VII.R. (4070 C.Sjt: H. Buckle. 4 V.B. E. Surrey Regt.)

Henry William Buckle was born in Freemantle, Hampshire in 1874. A warehouseman by occupation, he enlisted into the 4th Volunteer Battalion, East Surrey Regiment on 19 November 1892 and served with their City Imperial Volunteers detachment in South Africa during the Boer War as a Corporal in “D” Company of the Infantry Battalion. Continuing to serve in the 4th Volunteer Battalion, East Surrey Regiment after the Boer War, he was promoted Colour Sergeant on 1 May 1902 and attested for their successor unit, the 23rd Battalion, County of London Regiment (Territorial Force), on 1 April 1908. He was awarded the Volunteer Force Long Service Medal on 1 January 1909 and was discharged on 10 April 1908.

Surviving on file is a letter, written by Colour Sergeant Buckle to the Adjutant of the 23rd County of London Regiment, dated 24 May 1909, revealing Buckle’s pride in his Volunteer Battalion’s war service in South Africa some 9 years earlier:
‘Sir, I am surprised to see that the order of things / viz totally ignoring service men, and not allowing them to take part in any ceremonial affairs, are rigidly adhered to. The honour South Africa was earned by the good conduct and military behaviour of the representatives of the 4th V.B. East Surrey Regiment, who took part in that war and I think it only fair to have allowed those men to have had the honour of receiving the Colours from His Most Gracious Majesty the King and especially as it pleased His Majesty to present the medals to some of the Corps representatives by his own hands. Justice was prevented from doing so. I apologise for not writing an explanation before, but I intended to report myself to you this evening. I am Sir, H. Buckle. C/Sergt.

Sold together with a silver C.I.V. teaspoon (hallmarks for Birmingham 1899).
Dr David Biggins
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Medals to the CIV 1 year 3 months ago #71250

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QSA (4) Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Johannesburg, Diamond Hill (1073 Pte. J. March, CIV).

Together with an Ilford tribute shield medal, gold (9ct, 6.91g., hallmarks for Birmingham 1900), the obverse engraved ‘Presented to J. March by the residents of Ilford, Jany. 1901’, the reverse engraved ‘For Services in connection with South African War 1900-1'

James March was born around 1879. An engineer, he enlisted into the 1st Volunteer Battalion, Essex Regiment on 21 July 1898 and served with their City Imperial Volunteers detachment in South Africa during the Boer War in the Infantry Battalion. In January 1901, after his return from South Africa, he was presented with a gold tribute medal from the residents of Ilford, Essex.

Note: Tribute medal unrecorded by Hibbard.
Dr David Biggins
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Medals to the CIV 1 year 3 months ago #71252

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QSA (4) Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Johannesburg, Diamond Hill (1078 Pte. C. Green. CIV) unofficial re-engraved naming;
TFEM EdVII, with Second Award Bar (343 Sjt. C. Green. 4/Essex Regt.)

Charles Green was born around 1876. A painter by occupation, he enlisted into the 1st Volunteer Battalion, Essex Regiment on 15 July 1896 and served with their City Imperial Volunteers detachment in South Africa during the Boer War.

The City Press on 19 May 1900 printed extracts from a letter by Green in which he comments on the death of Private H. A. Miller of the 2nd Volunteer Battalion, Essex Regiment. A victim of dysentery, Miller passed away at Orange River Hospital on 11 March 1900.

Transferring in 1908 to his unit’s successor, the 4th Battalion Essex Regiment (Territorial Force), Green’s Territorial Force Efficiency Medal was awarded per Army Order 304 of 1 December 1908. Essex Units in the Great War by Burrows (1929) records him to have been serving as a Cook Sergeant in the 4th Battalion in 1914 and he continued serving after the war, the Second Award Bar to his TFEM being awarded per Army Order of May 1921. He had no Great War medal entitlement.
Dr David Biggins
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Medals to the CIV 1 year 3 months ago #71253

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MBE (Civil) Member’s 1st type breast badge, silver, hallmarks for London 1919;
QSA (4) Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Johannesburg, Diamond Hill (820. Cpl. H. T. Argent, CIV);
1914-15 Star (Capt. H. T. Argent. Essex R.);
BWM and VM (Capt. H. T. Argent.);
Territorial Decoration, GV silver and silver-gilt, hallmarks for London 1919, the reverse engraved ‘Major H. T. Argent. 5th. Essex Regt.’, with integral top brooch bar;
Special Constabulary Long Service Medal, GV 2nd issue, (1) Long Service 1942 (Sub-Sect. Ldr. Herbert T. Argent.)

MBE LG 1 January 1923: Major Herbert Thompson Argent, T.D., late Assistant Controller, the Contract Department, Disposal and Liquidation Commission.’

Herbert Thompson Argent was born at West Bergholt, Essex in 1879. An articled clerk, he enlisted into the 2nd Volunteer Battalion, Essex Regiment on 22 January 1896 and served during the Boer War in their City Imperial Volunteers detachment as Lance Corporal of “E” Company in the Infantry Battalion. On his return to England he was awarded the Boer War tribute medal of the Incorporated Law Society.

Argent remained in the volunteers, was commissioned Second Lieutenant in the 5th Battalion, Essex Regiment (Territorial Force) on 16 July 1908, around the time of its formation, and served during the Great War as a Captain with them at Gallipoli from 10 August 1915. He was very severely wounded at Suvla Bay one week after his arrival, on 17 August 1915, a bullet or piece of shrapnel becoming lodged in the right side of his chest. Promoted Temporary Major on 15 August 1916, he was appointed Assistant in the Materials Section of the Ministry of Munitions until 21 May 1919 when he relinquished his commission on account of ill-health caused by wounds. He was awarded a Silver War Badge, and died in Suffolk in 1957.
Dr David Biggins
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Medals to the CIV 1 year 3 months ago #71270

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QSA (4) Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Johannesburg, Diamond Hill 9501 Pte. E. G. [sic] Henneman, CIV);
1914 Star, with clasp (27820 Sapr: G. E. F. Henneman. RE;
BWM and VM (27820 Sjt. G. E. F. Kenneman [sic]. RE);
Imperial Service Medal, GVI 1st issue (George Ernest Frederick Henneman)

George Ernest Frederick Henneman was born in Islington, London in February 1882. Initially a brass rule maker by occupation, he enlisted into the 1st Cadet Battalion, King’s Royal Rifle Corps in 1897 and served in South Africa during the Boer War with their City Imperial Volunteers detachment in the Infantry Battalion. He is listed clearly as Ernest Henneman in the 1901 census, partially explaining the initials on his QSA

In 1911 Henneman was a sorter at Islington General Post Office and later, following the outbreak of the Great War, he attested for the Postal Section, Royal Engineers, serving with them in France from 4 October 1914. He was awarded his Imperial Service medal in 1943 on his retirement as an Overseer with the London Postal Region (LG 9 April 1943), and died in Kent in 1966.
Dr David Biggins
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Medals to the CIV 1 year 3 months ago #71271

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CBE (Civil) 2nd type;
OBE (Military) 1st type, hallmarks for London 1919;
QSA (3) Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Johannesburg (1558 Pte. B. J. [sic] Monteith, CIV);
KSA (2) (Lieut. J. B. L. Monteith. Gord. Hgrs.);
BWM and VM (Major J. B. L. Monteith);
Defence Medal.

VM officially re-impressed,

CBE (Civil) LG 8 June 1944.

OBE (Military) LG 12 December 1919:
‘In recognition of valuable services rendered in connection with the war.’

Joseph Basil Lawrence Monteith was born at Carstairs House, Lanarkshire, Scotland on 11 August 1878, the third son of Joseph Francis Stanislaus Robert Monteith, DL, JP, and his wife Florence Catharine Mary. He was educated at Rossall School and Stonyhurst College and, having enlisted in the Queen’s Edinburgh Rifle Volunteers, served in South Africa during the Boer War with their City Imperial Volunteers detachment in No. 2 Mounted Infantry Company. Following the CIV’s return to England, he remained in South Africa, serving in the Provisional Transvaal Constabulary from 2 October 1900 until 23 August 1901.

Returning to England, Monteith was commissioned Second Lieutenant in the 1st Battalion, Gordon Highlanders on 14 September 1901, and served once more in South Africa with them from 13 January 1902 until 21 October 1902. His KSA, reflecting service both in the ranks with the South African Constabulary and as an officer in the Gordon Highlanders, was issued from the roll of the latter.

Monteith was advanced Captain in 1910 and Major on 9 August 1916. He served as Adjutant of the Special Reserve from March 1911 to March 1914 and as Deputy Assistant Quarter Master General from 25 January 1915, serving at Malta, and receiving the OBE in connection with these services. His CBE (in the Civil Division) was awarded for services during the Second World War as Chairman of the Lanarkshire War Agricultural Executive Committee. He died in Lanarkshire in 1960.
Dr David Biggins
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