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Medals to the CIV 1 year 3 months ago #70956

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QSA (3) Cape Colony, Transvaal, Wittebergen (1590 Gnr: F. J. Clatworthy, C.I.V.);
Territorial Force Efficiency Medal EdVII (17 Sjt: F. J. Clatworthy. 5/Lon: B. R.F.A.);
Territorial Efficiency Medal GV (17 Sjt. F. J. Clatworthy. R.F.A.)

Frederick James Clatworthy was born in Islington, London in 1873. An opthalmological instrument maker by occupation, he joined the 3rd Middlesex Artillery Volunteers and served with the A Sub-division of the City Imperial Volunteers Battery during the Boer War. He was present at the fierce action at Barking Kop on 3 July 1900 and his letter written shortly afterwards, describing the action, was published in the City Press on 25 August 1900:

‘Gunner Clatworthy, of the H.A.C. [sic], writing from Winburg on July 22, gives a somewhat similar account of the engagement on “Black Tuesday,” July 3: “We advanced and took up positions against the guns, which were in two positions. Although under a cross-fire we silenced them for a time, the guns of the 38th battery shelling the right position, whilst we shelled the left. We then limbered up, and retired to take up a better position on Barking Kop, and were shelled all the way, the 38th battery remaining remaining in position. We halted under cover, and man handled the guns into position, which was a good one under the circumstances. Although unseen by the enemy, they knew we were there, and we were almost annihilated many times. One shell struck the ground just by the gun, and almost blinded us with dirt. Fortunately, it did not explode. A shrapnel burst just over our heads, and seemed to be filled with clay, as a piece hit me on the ear, and made it sting. Although we kept firing, we could not silence the guns, and, as we were getting short of ammunition, we ceased firing for a time. The rain was pouring down, and under cover of the haze an advance was made across the valley, and an attempt was made to rush our position. The mounted infantry who, of course, had left their horses in the rear, got up and ran towards us. We thought it was all up, but the Captain rode up and drove them back into position. The Boers were firing explosive bullets, which are more terrifying than any other projectile. We fired at 1500 yards, just to encourage the infantry, although our position seemed hopeless. The 38th Battery were attacked, and had all the officers shot. They had 18 casualties altogether, and the Boers actually had the gun in their hands when the Australian Bushmen poured a volley into them. They succeeded in removing the handspike and tangent sight. Our captain, who is on the artillery staff, rode up and called for volunteers to bring the guns out of action. Drivers Vine and Morden went in, and brought them out safely. Immediately after this the Boers abandoned their position, and we came into action on the left flank. As they tried to flank us we advanced and took their position, from which we shelled them as they retreated. Afterwards we bivouacked in a splendid position... They say in London that the war is over but I reckon it has only just started. Nobody could have had harder fighting than we have had, and we cannot form any idea when we shall be back, as De Wet is very slippery”.’

After Clatworthy’s return to England with the C.I.V in December 1900, he was presented with a special prize by his Volunteer Brigade, no small accolade considering that the 3rd Middlesex Artillery Volunteers sent a total of 1,120 Officers and Men to serve in South Africa:

‘The Duke of Cambridge presented the prizes to the 3rd Middlesex Volunteer Artillery at St. James’s Hall last evening. Major A. R. Farrer, in command, spoke of the work of the regiment during the year, and said they had 78 officers and men away at the front. They all mourned the loss of Colonel Hoskier, who was killed in action on February 23, and three gunners who had died in South Africa. The Duke of Cambridge then presented the prizes. The loudest round of applause bestowed on each prize winner was that reserved for Gunner Clatworthy, C.I.V., who was presented with a special prize by the officer commanding his section in the C.I.V. Battery.’ (Globe, 22 December 1900 refers).

Clatworthy was awarded the Territorial Force Efficiency Medal per Army Order 7 of 1 January 1909, and died in Croydon, Surrey in 1940.

Dr David Biggins
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Medals to the CIV 1 year 3 months ago #70975

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CBE (Civil) ;
OBE (Military) HM 1919;
QSA (3) Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Johannesburg (1558 Pte. B. J. [sic] Monteith, CIV);
KSA (2) (Lieut. J. B. L. Monteith. Gord. Hgrs.);
BWM and VM (Major J. B. L. Monteith);
Defence Medal, VM officially re-impressed

CBE (Civil) LG 8 June 1944.

OBE (Military) LG 12 December 1919:
‘In recognition of valuable services rendered in connection with the war.’

Joseph Basil Lawrence Monteith was born at Carstairs House, Lanarkshire, Scotland on 11 August 1878, the third son of Joseph Francis Stanislaus Robert Monteith, DL, JP, and his wife Florence Catharine Mary. He was educated at Rossall School and Stonyhurst College and, having enlisted in the Queen’s Edinburgh Rifle Volunteers, served in South Africa during the Boer War with their City Imperial Volunteers detachment in No. 2 Mounted Infantry Company. Following the CIV’s return to England, he remained in South Africa, serving in the Provisional Transvaal Constabulary from 2 October 1900 until 23 August 1901.

Returning to England, Monteith was commissioned Second Lieutenant in the 1st Battalion, Gordon Highlanders on 14 September 1901, and served once more in South Africa with them from 13 January 1902 until 21 October 1902. His KSA, reflecting service both in the ranks with the South African Constabulary and as an officer in the Gordon Highlanders, was issued from the roll of the latter.

Monteith was advanced Captain in 1910 and Major on 9 August 1916. He served as Adjutant of the Special Reserve from March 1911 to March 1914 and as Deputy Assistant Quarter Master General from 25 January 1915, serving at Malta, and receiving the OBE in connection with these services. His CBE (in the Civil Division) was awarded for services during the Second World War as Chairman of the Lanarkshire War Agricultural Executive Committee.

He died in Lanarkshire in 1960.
Dr David Biggins
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Medals to the CIV 1 year 3 months ago #71090

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[ CMG ]
QSA (5) Cape Colony, Paardeberg, Driefontein, Johannesburg, Wittebergen, top clasp a tailor’s copy and unofficial rivets between clasps (709 Pte. A. H. Windsor, CIV);
1914-15 Star (Capt: A. H. Windsor. 11/Lond:R.);
BWM and VM with MID oak leaves (Lt. Col. A. H. Windsor.);
Territorial Decoration, GV silver and silver-gilt, hallmarks for London 1922, with integral top riband bar

CMG LG 3 June 1916.

Arthur Herbert Windsor was born in Ealing, Middlesex on 18 July 1880 and was a Clerk by occupation. He joined the 3rd Middlesex Artillery Volunteers in 1898 and served with No. 1 Mounted Infantry Company, City Imperial Volunteers during the Boer War. Commissioned Second Lieutenant into the 11th (County of London) Battalion (Finsbury Rifles), The London Regiment, Territorial Force, on 24 November 1908, he was advanced Captain on 13 August 1913 and served during the Great War, initially in the Gallipoli Campaign, where the Battalion landed at Suvla Bay on 11 August 1915. Evacuated in December due to severe casualties from combat, disease and harsh weather, the battalion moved to Egypt. For his services during the campaign in the Dardanelles Windsor was Mentioned in Despatches (LG 13 July 1916) and was appointed a Companion of the Order of Saint Michael and Saint George.

Remaining in the Middle East, the 11th Battalion saw action throughout the Palestine Campaign, and Windsor was again Mentioned in Despatches a second time for services in this theatre (LG 12 January 1920). He died in Westminster in 1972.
Dr David Biggins
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Medals to the CIV 1 year 3 months ago #71091

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QSA (6) Cape Colony, Paardeberg, Driefontein, Johannesburg, Wittebergen, Diamond Hill, unofficial rivets between fifth and sixth clasps (1363 Pte. F. H. Bailey, CIV);
1914-15 Star (168, B.S. Mjr. F. H. Bailey, R.F.A.);
BWM and VM (168. W.O. Cl. 2. F. H. Bailey. R.A.);
TFEM EdVII, with two Additional Award Bars (168 Cpl. F. H. Bailey. 5/London B. R.F.A.)

Frederick Henry Bailey was born in Marylebone, London on 12 January 1878 and was a Compositor by occupation. After joining the 3rd Middlesex Artillery Volunteers in 1898, he served with No. 1 Company, Mounted Infantry, City Imperial Volunteers during the Boer War. He subsequently served with the Royal Field Artillery during the Great War on the Western Front from 15 March 1915, attaining the rank of Warrant Officer Class II and after the war, he served again, attesting for the Royal Artillery at Kennington on 15 April 1920.

Bailey was awarded the Territorial Force Efficiency Medal per Army Order 75 of 1910 while a Corporal of the 5th London Brigade, Royal Field Artillery. The first bar was received per Army Order 192 of 1922 and the second bar awarded in 1932.
Dr David Biggins
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Medals to the CIV 1 year 3 months ago #71092

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QSA (1) Cape Colony (489 Pte. F. P. Elliott. CIV);
BWM 1914-20 (Capt. F. P. Elliott);
TFEM EdVII (3 Sjt: F. P. Elliott. 4/Lndn; (Hwtzr.) B. R.F.A.);
Volunteer Force Long Service Medal (India & the Colonies), GV (Sjt. F. P. Elliott, Karachi Arty. Voltrs.).

Frederick Percy Elliott was born in London in 1876. A clerk by occupation, he joined the 2nd Kent Artillery Volunteers in 1895 and served in South Africa where, as member of the 2nd Company, Mounted Infantry, City Imperial Volunteers, he was one of 12 men from his volunteer unit to serve with the CIV during the Boer War. Afterwards, promoted Sergeant, he served with the 4th London (Howitzer) Brigade, Royal Field Artillery, receiving the Territorial Force Efficiency Medal per Army Order 7 of 1 January 1909.

Commissioned into the Indian Army Reserve of Officers during the Great War, Elliott is shown in the Indian Army List as Second Lieutenant on 18 July 1917, Temporary Captain on 15 January 1918, and Lieutenant on 18 July 1918. He resigned from the Indian Army Reserve of Officers on 1 May 1922 and was permitted to retain the rank of Captain.
Dr David Biggins
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Medals to the CIV 1 year 3 months ago #71093

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QSA (4) Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Johannesburg, Diamond Hill (916 Cpl. W. A. Bodger, CIV) minor official correction to surname;
1914-15 Star (3. Whlr. Q.M. Sjt. W. A. Bodger. R.F.A.);
BWM and VM (3 W.O. Cl. 2 W. A. Bodger. R.A.);
Volunteer Force Long Service Medal, EdVII (4415 Sjt: W. A. Bodger. 1/Essex R.G.A.V.);
TFEM GV (880001 W.O. Cl. II W. A. Bodger. R.F.A.)

William Ainsworth Bodger was born in Hackney, London in 1872. A wheeler by occupation, he joined the 1st Essex Artillery Volunteers in 1890 and serving as a Corporal, was one of 12 men from that unit to serve with the City Imperial Volunteers in South Africa during the Boer War. Afterwards returning to the 1st Essex Royal Garrison Artillery Volunteers, he was promoted Sergeant and proceeded to serve during the Great War on the Western Front with the Royal Field Artillery as a Wheeler Quartermaster Sergeant from 17 November 1915, reaching the rank of Warrant Officer Class II. He was discharged from the Royal Field Artillery Territorial Force on 22 March 1920.

Dr David Biggins
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