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Medals to the 9th Lancers 4 months 4 weeks ago #76103

  • djb
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The London Medal Company are advertising the 8 clasp QSA trio to SSM C Smith, 9th Lancers. The trio sold at DNW for a hammer price of £800. Totals (inc VAT for UK only): £1,030. R19,900. Au$1,800. Can$1,720. US$1,370.

Cost now £1,250.
Dr David Biggins

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Medals to the 9th Lancers 2 months 4 weeks ago #77089

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Picture courtesy of the London Medal Company

QSA (5) Natal, Relief of Kimberley, Johannesburg, Diamond Hill, Wittebergen; (2396. SQ. SJT. MJR. C.E. WARDELL. 9/LCRS.);
KSA (2) (2396 R.SERJT:-MAJ: C.E. WARDELL. 9TH. LANCERS.);
Delhi Durbar Medal 1903 in Silver;
Army LS&GC EdVII (2396 SERJT: MAJ: C.E. WARDELL. 9TH. LANCERS.)

Charles Edward Wardell was born in North Bempton, near Bridlington, Yorkshire, and having worked as a farm labourer, then attested for service with the British Army at Scarborough on 21st February 1884 joining as a Private (No.2396) the 9th Queen’s Royal Lancers. Posted out to India on 20th September 1884, and then home again on 24th November 1885, he was appointed to unpaid Lance Corporal on 10th December 1885, and to paid Lance Corporal on 7th October 1886, before being promoted to Corporal on 10th April 1887, and then appointed to unpaid Lance Sergeant on 12th June 1889 and to paid Lance Sergeant on 24th June 1889. Wardell was promoted to Sergeant on 1st October 1889.

Wardell was promoted to Troop Sergeant Major Rough Rider on 17th March 1892, and was then appointed to Squadron Sergeant Major on 11th November 1893, and re-engaged at Aldershot to complete 21 years with the Colours on 20th February 1896. Posted to South Africa from 26th August 1896, and then to India from 2nd April 1898, he was posted back to South Africa with the outbreak of the Boer War on 24th October 1899, when he was posted with his regiment on active service in Natal. Wardell subsequently took part in operations leading to the relief of Kimberley, and was in action at Johannesburg, Diamond Hill and Wittebergen. Wardell was still on active service there when he was promoted to Regimental Sergeant Major on 27th February 1901. Wardell was awarded a Mention in Despatches for his gallant and distinguished service by Lord Robert’s in his Despatch as published in the London Gazette on 4th September 1901.

Wardell was by then the most senior non-commissioned officer in the regiment, and was then posted with it to India on 5th April 1902, and is confirmed as having been present on the occasion of the Delhi Durbar in January 1903, for which he received the medal. This is a scarce award to his regiment. Wardell was also awarded the Army Long Service and Good Conduct Medal in Army Orders No.12 of 1903. Wardell was permitted to extend his service beyond 21 years with the Colours on 8th November 1905 and was posted home on 15th November 1906 on his discharge. Wardell went on to work as a time keeper in a motor works, and was living in Redditch, Worcestershire when he died on 5th May 1925. Confirmed as his full entitlement.

£1,800 [sic]
Dr David Biggins
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Medals to the 9th Lancers 1 month 3 weeks ago #77671

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Henry Bubear 9th Lancers of the Line (Queens Royal)
4471 Private Henry Bubear was born in 1880, at Manor Place, London.
He attested for the 9th Lancers on 9 February 1900, having previously served with the 3rd Battalion East Surrey Militia Regiment which he purchased. Henry was 19 years and 6 months when he joined the Lancers of the Line at Canterbury. He was 5 feet 6 inches tall, of fresh complexion with grey eyes and brown hair and weighed around 8 stone 6 pounds. Scars to forearm and knees were noted and his religious denomination was C of E
His profession was stated as Shopman, this was probably in line with him working in his father Williams tailors outfitter shop.
Although Henry joined the 9th Lancers, and the majority of his papers, medal rolls and medals are attributed to that regiment. His time during the Boer War was with the 5th Lancers from the 26th of November 1900 to the 4th of April 1902.





Brief notes on the latter part of the 5th and 9th Lancer’s time in South Africa
5th Lancers
During the second phase of the war the 5th Lancers were mainly in the Eastern Transvaal operating under Smith-Dorrien, Spens, and other commanders. They took part in the sweep into the Vryheid district. A portion of the regiment was in Cape Colony in 1901 and 1902, and had rather an unhappy time on the Zeekoe River near Aberdeen on 6th April 1901, when they lost 2 killed, 9 wounded, and 23 taken prisoners.
9th Lancers
Early in the year 1901 the regiment was sent into Cape Colony to pursue Boers who had crossed the Orange, and, acting under Colonel Scobell, they and the Cape Mounted Rifles gained great credit for their successful endeavours to close with the enemy. Over and over again this column surprised laagers and killed or captured many of the enemy. In particular, they were specially praised for the capture of Letter's commando on 5th September 1901. Lord Kitchener described it as a brilliant success. In this affair the 9th lost 7 killed and 5 wounded. During the remainder of the campaign the regiments of the brigade were mainly employed in Cape Colony. The 9th sailed for India in March 1902, after two and a half years' campaigning. Their war services were as continuously hard, as brilliant, and as fruitful as those of any other regiment in South Africa.



Henry’s Service time line: -
09/02/1900 to 19/11/1900 Home
26/11/1900 to 04/04/1902 South Africa (5th Lancers)
05/04/1902 to 05/10/1906 India
06/10/1906 to 08/02/ 1908 South Africa
24/01/1908 to 08/02/1908 Home
09/02/1908 to 08/08/1912 Army Reserve

During his time in the Lancers Henry qualified as a nursing orderly in 1904.
He married Elizabeth Mary Auckland in 1910 and had 3 children, Ethel, Geoffrey and Henry Frederick. The 1911 census has Bubear’s living at Forest Gate where Henry was employed as a male nurse.

Private Bubear was recalled to the Colours on the outbreak of the Great War on 4 August 1914, he served on the Western Front from 15 September 1914. During his time in France the 9th Lancers were at Longueval on the 27th September 1914, their billets were heavily shelled on the 29th September. 16th October the 9th were near Ypres and went into action on 21st October.
In-between the fighting, shelling and carnage of 1914 and 1915 the 9th Lancers found time for Church Parades, Concerts, Demonstrations, Working Parties, Lectures and Musketry practice. It is no surprise that during the opening stages of Henry’s baptism of fire in this new conflict remained with him throughout his time in France. On 4 January 1916, he is recorded as suffering from shock and admitted to 5th London Field Ambulance, this was probably close to the 9th Lancers HQ at Enquin. He returned to England on 17 January 1916 and spent time in R.I Netley hospital and was discharged due to wounds physically and mentally on 30 May 1916. He was awarded Silver War Badge number 70931, and was discharged with an exemplary record.


Lancers WW1



In 1921 Henry was living in Carr Street Bankfoot Bradford with his family and was employed as a male nurse. He also received a 30% degree of disablement pension. During 1939 Henry Bubear resided at 2 locations, Occupation Road Huddersfield and Linley Drive Bradford. He seems to have retired and unfortunately his whereabouts are unknown until 1952 when his death was recorded on 17th July 1952 aged 72. I have a feeling he was separated at some point from his family and spent some time at Occupation Road Huddersfield. This is reflected in the 2 locations he is recorded at being at 1939. The family residence seems to be Linley Drive where he is recorded living with his wife and son Geoffrey. However, he is living with 3 other non-family members at Occupation Road during the same year. As previously mentioned, he died in 1952 at Winchester Avenue Leicester. He left his estate to his eldest daughter Ethel May Bubear.

You only live once, but if you do it right, once is enough.
Best regards
Dave

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