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Artillery and Ammunition 1 month 2 weeks ago #79063

  • Neville_C
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More shells, this time from in and around Kimberley.
Note the five shells made in the De Beers workshops during the siege (three 4.1-inch “Long Cecil”; two 2.5-inch mountain gun)

The notable absence of 75 mm Creusot shells is probably due to the fact that the investing force was primarily from the Orange Free State, whose artillery did not possess this type of armament.






A. De Beers 4.1-inch B.L. “Long Cecil” (segment; unfired) - 2 different shapes, the right-hand one with a more pointed nose
B. De Beers 2.5-inch R.M.L. Mountain Gun (segment; bright example unfired)
C. 155 mm Creusot “Long Tom” (shrapnel, with time fuze – unfired)
D. 155 mm Creusot “Long Tom” (shrapnel on left; common on right)
E. Vickers Maxim 1-pdr “pompom”
F. 37 mm Krupp-Gruson Q.F. (for field guns)
G. 9-pdr Armstrong R.M.L. Studded Shell
H. 4.7-inch Q.F. Naval cartridge
I. 12-pdr Q.F. Naval cartridge
J. 75 mm Krupp Q.F. cartridge
K. 75 mm Krupp Q.F. (shrapnel on left; common on right – both unfired)
L. 75 mm Krupp B.L. (segment)
M. 75 mm Krupp B.L. (shrapnel, with time fuze)
N. British 15-pdr shrapnel (one with time & percussion fuze loosely attached)
O. De Beers 4.1-inch B.L. “Long Cecil” (segment; fired)
P. 4.7-inch Q.F. Naval nose cone (Lyddite, with direct action percussion fuze)
Q. 155 mm Creusot "long Tom" shrapnel base, with shrapnel bullets
R. 75 mm Krupp Q.F. (common)

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Artillery and Ammunition 1 month 2 weeks ago #79064

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De Beers 2.5-inch Mountain Gun segment shell, manufactured in Kimberley during the siege.







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Artillery and Ammunition 1 month 2 weeks ago #79065

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De Beers 4.1-inch "Long Cecil" segment shell, manufactured in Kimberley during the siege.

Two different shapes were produced. The drawing on the right shows a more pointed nose, with the driving band set closer to the base.










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Artillery and Ammunition 1 month 2 weeks ago #79066

  • Rob D
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Fascinating to see that the de Beers shells used a humble percussion cap like these to ignite the black powder in the shell.

The past is not dead. In fact, it's not even past.
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Artillery and Ammunition 1 month 2 weeks ago #79067

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The one part my fuze is missing ...

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Artillery and Ammunition 1 month 2 weeks ago #79100

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Shell believed to have been manufactured at Messrs Begbie & Co's ammunition factory, Johannesburg, for use with captured British 15-pdr field guns.

This type of shell appears in the photograph "Boer Ammunition (Shells, etc.) and Rifles in charge of Chief Magazine Master and Staff". Being longer than 75 mm Krupp QF shells, and having a driving band set too close to the base for employment with 75 mm Creusot QF guns, its intended use remained a mystery until the present example came to light.

As the shell below has been fired, it is possible to examine the rifling grooves cut into the driving band. These are of distinctive British 15-pdr form, allowing for the assumption that these projectiles were cast in Johannesburg, specifically for use with captured British guns.

The final image includes the incorrect observation that "The shells have been made expressly for this gun in Germany". Note the case of shells labelled "ENGLISCH 3 [inch] KANON".

With thanks to M C Heunis.


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