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Brass T C badge puzzler Boer war?? 4 years 4 months ago #57360

  • LinneyI
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Dreammaster
I have no idea whatsoever regarding the meaning of the intertwined "TC" badge. However, the "bullet clip" you mention (more correctly an ammunition charger) was made by Deutsch Metallpatronen, Karlsruhe (DM). These were used to charger load the 7mm Mauser rifle and carbine used by the Boers. It held five rounds.
The sword you illustrate has all the characteristics of the "Sword, Cavalry, Pattern /99" ; it replaced the earlier cavalry sword patterns on issue at the commencement of the South African war. The markings "E" indicate manufacture/inspection at the Royal Small Arms Factory, Enfield. BTW, the Pattern /99 cavalry sword was not at all popular with the chaps in the field. Reportedly, the grip was uncomfortable and the bowl was rather fragile in use.
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IL.
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Brass T C badge puzzler Boer war?? 4 years 4 months ago #57372

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LinneyI
Thank you so much for you information. I don't know if you went to the photo's on my OneDrive account?
The sword has R.R.D stamped on it below B and below 157. This information is on both the bowl as well as at the top of the Sheath. Do you know if this would possibly indicate Regiment, Company and issue?
I see the mark EFD, which you have identified as the Enfield factory mark.
There are 3 other marks on the other side of the blade:
The first may or may not be a crown over a B over 73
The second a crown over 30 and below E
The third appears to have been made after the original stampings,
it is a crown above 44 and below E
The second stamping is the only one that appears on both sides of the blade. It was this E that I referenced to as Edward VII?
I see the badge attachment did not go through so will attach it now. It appears that the badge may have preceded a second brass badge which I have also included in the OneDrive file for the "Bechuanaland Protectorate Police" it is an ornate affair with the royal coat of arms, the lion above and the lion and Unicorn rampant on thistle beds on either side.
I find the piece of cloth particularly interesting, it has a small section of the Africa medal ribbon attached, and the wording on it is:
THE CLOTH
Our boys are wearing at the front
They are out on active service
Wiping something off a slate
With best wishes and kindly thoughts from South Africa.
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Brass T C badge puzzler Boer war?? 4 years 4 months ago #57373

  • LinneyI
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Dreammaster
Yes, I did see some of your pics; the others were simply not available on my system. British military weaponry inspection/repair marks were - during the period we are discussing - usually in the form of a Crown over an initial and often a number.
"EFD" denotes RSAF Enfield, as noted. However, before a weapon passed into store prior to issue, it had to pass official in-house inspection. Indicated by a stamp denoting "where and when and by whom". Testing was rigorous and swords, for example, had to pass a bending test amongst others. After issue and active service, weaponry was frequently inspected to see that it was still serviceable and was modified according to the List of Changes and Armourer's Notes. The inspection may have been carried out at the original place of manufacture - or else at a repair facility. There was a large RSAF in Birmingham; repair/inspection symbols used there were a Crown over a B and a number.
You might be correct about the intertwined "CT" badge being intended as a device to be placed over another badge. Sorry, I just don't know.
Over the years, I have seen a number of examples where a soldier serving in South Africa during the Boer War writing a sentiment on a square/oblong of uniform material and sending it home as a keepsake. Your example appears to be a commercial offering available at the time. I have never seen another quite like yours.
I hope the above helps a bit. The whole subject of British Military manufacture/inspection/repair symbols is far too extensive to cover here!
Regards
IL.
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