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Trooper A. D. Campbell, Kitchener's Fighting Scouts - k.i.a. near Heilbron, 1901 1 month 1 day ago #82826

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The memorial is in St Philip's Church, Bungendore, New South Wales. My thanks to the church for both taking and sending me the photo of the memorial. The photo of the church interior was taken from their Facebook page.
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Death at the Front.
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....There is reason to fear that the telegram recelved by the Premier, through the Lieutenant-Governor, reporting that No. 26,089, Alexander David Campbell, Kitchener's Fighting Scouts, was killed in action near Heilbron on October 3 refers to Mr. Alexander Douglas Campbell, of Turalla, Bungendore, a brother of Lieutenant Campbell, of the Bungendore troop of Australian Horse. Besides the change in the second name there was also some difference in the regimental numbers; but Lieutenant Campbell fears that it will he found that the message records the death of his brother. Telegrams have been dispatched to obtain definite information. Mr. Alexander Douglas Campbell left for South Africa some time ago with the object of embarking in speculation, but found the country so disturbed that he volunteered for Kitchener's Fighting Scouts. He was a son of the late Mr. D. H. Campbell, who will be remembered by old residents for his exploits in dealing with bushrangers, and was well known in the Goulburn district.
Goulburn Evening Penny Post, Thursday 10th October 1901
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....GOULBURN, Thursday. — It is feared that the Alexander David Campbell, of Kitchener's Scouts, reported to have been killed in action, near Heilbron, is Alexander Douglas Campbell, of Turalla, Bungendore, a brother of Lieutenant Campbell, of the Australian Horse. He left for Africa, intending to embark in business, but finding the country so disturbed, joined Kitchener's Scouts.
....BUNGENDORE, Thursday. — Profound sorrow is expressed on all sides at the news received yesterday of his death while in action of Alex. D. Campbell, Turalla. He left Australia in June last for South Africa, where he joined Kitchener's Scouts. He was a member of the Powell family, one of the oldest and most respected in the district.
The Daily Telegraph [Sydney], Friday 11th October 1901
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....Quite a gloom was cast over the town when the sad news reached here on Wednesday evening that Mr Alex Campbell was killed in action, at Heilbron, on the 3rd inst. It was only in June last that Mr Campbell left here for South Africa and when he got over joined Kitchener's fighting scouts. His many friends, who are naturally much distressed, are anxiously awaiting further news, as there is just a gleam of hope that it may not be the gentleman named, there being a difference in the second name. The wire received here stated that Alex Davis Campbell, of Kitchener's fighting scouts, was killed in action at Heilbron. Mr Campbell's name is "Alex Douglas."
Queanbeyan Age, Saturday 12th October 1901
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....It is with the deepest feelings of regret I have to confirm the news of the death of Alexander Douglas Campbell, who was shot in an engagement in South Africa last month. He was the youngest member of the Campbell family, and was a warm favourite with all who were acquainted with him. He went to South Africa some few months ago with the object of settling there, but not liking the appearance of Capetown he wanted to go to Kimberley, but found he could not do so unless he joined some regiment for six months, which he did. He was shot in the neck by an explosive bullet, and died almost immediately. The greatest sympathy is expressed for his relatives, to whom his death has been a severe blow, and numerous messages of condolence have been received by them from sympathetic friends.
Goulburn Evening Penny Post, Saturday 16th November 1901
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....A special service was held in St. Philip's Church of England on Sunday evening as thanksgiving for peace being proclaimed in South Africa.
Goulborn Herald, Monday 9th June 1902
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....A marble tablet has been erected in St. Philip's Church of England to the memory of the late Mr. Alex D. Campbell, who was mortally wounded on the 31st of October 1901 at Heilbron, South Africa. The tablet was erected by his comrades and friends. The deceased was a nephew of Mr. Nathaniel Powell of Turalla.
Queanbeyan Age, Tuesday 13th October 1903......Note: The incorrect date of his death above is as was printed in the newspaper.
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Trooper A. D. Campbell, Kitchener's Fighting Scouts - k.i.a. near Heilbron, 1901 1 month 1 day ago #82832

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His signed attestation papers for KFS:

Dr David Biggins
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Trooper A. D. Campbell, Kitchener's Fighting Scouts - k.i.a. near Heilbron, 1901 4 weeks 1 day ago #82855

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Thanks, David. I see that he was insured for £500 (life insurance?) with the A.M.P. Society, New South Wales. I was aware that some UK Volunteers and Imperial Yeomanry had life insurance paid for them - usually £100 - but this is the first time I've read of an Australian having it.

The Australian Mutual Provident Society was established in Sydney in 1849; it expanded throughout Australia, and also had branches in New Zealand and England. It seems to have been demutualised around 1999/2000.

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Trooper A. D. Campbell, Kitchener's Fighting Scouts - k.i.a. near Heilbron, 1901 4 weeks 1 day ago #82856

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Berenice
I was aware that there were insurance policies for members of some Colonial Australian contingents - and it took a bit to find the reference. Laurie Field's "The Forgotten War" tells interested readers that "In line with a recommendation of the commandants conference, most colonies took out two hundred and fifty pound death policies on members of the first three contingents". The exception was the Colony of Victoria which preferred ".. to stand by the dependants of deceased soldiers itself ". It is highly likely that those policies would have been taken out on societies such as AMP, etc. The conference Field refers to was the one which determined whether Colonial Australian contingents were to be under one command or otherwise.
Field's reference to "the first three contingents" is important - as those contingents were publicly funded by the various Colonies. The various later Imperial Bushmen contingents were the responsibility of the Imperial Government for pay, pensions, etc. And the various contingents of the Australian Commonwealth Horse would be the responsibility of the recently Federated Australian Government.
As Alexander Douglas Campbell was not a member of any official Colonial Australian contingent, the abovementioned death policy would not apply. Being a Grazier (or perhaps a member of a family of Graziers), the AMP policy would have been a private arrangement or purchased after a whip-around of the local community.
Reply posted this ANZAC Day, 2022.
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Trooper A. D. Campbell, Kitchener's Fighting Scouts - k.i.a. near Heilbron, 1901 4 weeks 21 hours ago #82860

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Known as Alick to family, he's remembered on his brother's gravestone at Turulla, but with no mention of where he died, so not a war memorial. Turulla is a homestead near Bungendore, and another resident there, in addition to the Campbells, was Owen Taylor, senior. His two sons Thomas and Owen Albert also served in the ABW - Thomas initially, reportedly, in Rimington's Scouts, and then in the 2nd Contingent NSW Mounted Rifles, and Owen, junior, in the 1st Australian Horse, and later in the 3rd Contingent NSW Mounted Rifles.

www.warmemorialsregister.nsw.gov.au/cont...k-douglas-campbell-0

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