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Haslingden, Lancashire 1 year 2 weeks ago #70558

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In St James's Church, Haslingden.


To the Glory of God and
In Memory of
CAPTAIN PERCY SWINBURNE PARKER.
CORPORAL JAMES KERSHAW.
LANCE CORPORAL ARTHUR STREET.
TROOPER ALBERT BARNES.
PRIVATES FRED CHEW. & J. SMITH.
PRIVATE JAMES WILKINSON.
PRIVATE THOMAS LEVITT.
PRIVATE THOMAS CARNEY.
PRIVATE THOMAS WARBURTON.
PRIVATE WILLIAM GARNETT.
WHO GAVE THEIR LIVES FOR THEIR COUNTRY IN THE
SOUTH AFRICAN WAR.
1899 - 1902.


Captain Percy Swinburne Parker
www.angloboerwar.com/forum/17-memorials-...lbron-1-2-1902#66263

Lance Corporal Arthur Street

….The sad intelligence has reached Haslingden, relative to the death of Private Street, of the 2nd Fusiliers, who was killed during the fighting at Spion Kop, the other day. The deceased private was 25 years old, and previous to joining the army five years ago, he was a member of the volunteer corps, and was a good shot. One of his brothers is a sergeant-major in the Royal Engineers. The deceased has served in Crete, and fought at Omdurman and in another Soudan engagement. He was over a short time ago, when he attended the military service at the Parish Church, Haslingden. His parents reside at Meadows Farm and they received two letters on Tuesday of last week. An uncle, living at Ramsbottom, has received a subsequent letter in which the deceased mentions the fact that they were going on to Spion Kop, and he hoped to get through all right. The family were somewhat prepared for the sad news, as on Wednesday night, one of the brothers of the deceased visited Baxenden Conservative Club, where he was told that there would be bad news in the morning. The prediction has since been verified, and from a list given in another place, it will be seen that the soldiers from Haslingden have suffered severely, Private Street being killed, while several others are wounded or missing. The two letters referred to are unavoidably held over until Wednesday's "Echo."

The Haslingden Guardian, Saturday 3rd February 1900
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LETTER FROM A HASLINGDEN SOLDIER - SINCE DEAD.
….The sad intelligence has reached Haslingden relating to the death of Private Street, of the 2nd Fusiliers, who was killed during the fighting at Spion Kop, the other day. The deceased private was 25 years old, and previous to joining the army five years ago, he was a member of the volunteer corps, and was a good shot. One of his brothers is a sergeant-major in the Royal Engineers. The deceased had served in Crete, and fought at Omdurman and at another Soudan engagement. He was over a short time ago, when he attended the military service at the Parish Church, Haslingden. His parents reside at Meadows Farm and they received two letters on Tuesday of last week. An uncle, living at Ramsbottom, has received a subsequent letter in which the deceased mentions the fact that they were going on to Spion Kop, and he hoped to get through all right. The family were somewhat prepared for the sad news, as on Wednesday night one of the brothers of the deceased visited Baxenden Conservative Club, where he was told that there would be bad news in the morning. The prediction has since been verified, and from a list given in another place, it will be seen that the soldiers from Haslingden have suffered severely, Private Street being killed, while several others are wounded or missing. The letters referred to are as follows: -
December 24th, 1899.
….Just a few lines hoping that you will excuse me not writing before now, as I have had no time after we sailed. We have had a splendid voyage out to here. I am in the best of health, hoping all at home are the same. I hope that you will not think much about my being here, for it will be months before we get into action yet, as our brigade have not half arrived yet; but I hope they will not keep us in Durban long, for I want to be up and doing, as a soldier gets rusty if laid aside too long, so I hope that they will start us on the job as soon as possible, for I am anxious to begin so that we can finish early in the New Year. Give my love to sisters and brothers and to cousin Hargreaves, and my respects to all enquiring friends, hoping to be spared to return home to you all again in good health and strength. I will say good-bye for the present, hoping you are all enjoying good health, as I am in the best of health at present and hope to remain in good health until the end of the war, so that I may see as much as possible of any fighting there may be in store for my regiment. Wishing you all a merry Christmas and a Happy New Year. - From your loving and affectionate son and brother,
ARTHUR.

Estcourt, December 29th, 1899.
….Just a few lines hoping to find you enjoying good health, as this leaves me in good health, at present. We move up to the front on the 4th of January, 1900, and we expect to come in contact with the enemy very soon now. give my love to all at home and to all enquiring friends. I don't know how we will go on for writing when we move. It is hard to get paper now. The weather is fearfully hot, and the nights are cold and damp. We are enjoying ourselves in this camp immensely, but we must have a very rough time of it before the war is over, which I think will be about the end of March or early in April. Give my love to John Robert and (_______) boy, and also to Uncle Dan and Janet and family, and tell them that I am all right and in the best of health. All the troops are in good health here. We had a very poor Christmas here - jam and bread for breakfast, half-cooked meat and potatoes for dinner, and "dog biscuit" for tea; and coffee we drink is a disgrace to civilisation; it is good clean water spoiled. The tobacco which the Volunteers bought for us has not yet been given to us. It ought to have been given to us on or about the 4th of December whilst on board the s.s. Norman, but we have given up all hopes of ever seeing it now. I will write as often as possible to let you know how I go on after we move. So now I think this is about all this time, as all is very quiet here. - I remain, your ever-loving son and brother,
ARTHUR.

….Deceased's uncle, Daniel Street, of Ramsbottom, has received a letter in which the former says they were still going on to Spion Kop and that he hoped to get through it all right.

The Haslingden Guardian, Saturday 10th February 1900
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LOCAL MAN KILLED AT SPION KOP.
….Private Arthur Street, of D Company, 2nd Lancashire Fusiliers, described as of Meadows Farm, Haslingden, has been killed at Spion Kop. As a boy he attended the New Jerusalem School, at which Mr. G. Washington was the master. He was 25 years of age. Previous to enlisting he was employed in the moulding department of Messrs. Joseph Strang's ironworks. He was a member of the Haslingden Volunteer Corps for some years, and became a good shot, and joined the regular army in 1895. He went through the Egyptian campaign, taking part in the battles of Omdurman and Khartoum, and also in the quelling of the insurrection at Crete. On his return to England from the Soudan he was granted two months' leave of absence, but was re-called at the end of the seventh week to go to South Africa. A brother of his is a sergeant-major in the Royal Engineers, and is at present stationed at Portsmouth. A pathetic incident in connection with the death is that while Private Street was lying dead on the battlefield his mother went to the Haslingden Post Office to send a parcel containing cigarettes and writing paper to him, but the parcel was too late for last week's mail. An uncle of Private Street is Mr. Daniel Hitchings, of 3, Victoria-street, Ramsbottom, a member of the Ramsbottom Fire Brigade, and he recently received a letter from his nephew, of which the letter stated that he did not know when the troops would move on, but he hoped it would be soon, as he was tired of being inactive.

The Haslingden Guardian, Saturday 17th February 1900
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Trooper Albert Barnes

….In another column will be found a last letter from the ill-fated Trooper Barnes, of Haslingden, who has had the singular misfortune to go through the war practically unscathed, only to fall a victim in the end. The first intimation of the sad denouement was conveyed through the medium of the "Daily Mail" of Saturday last, but we are informed that official confirmation has now been received. Poor Barnes was a prolific correspondent, and his despatches from the seat of war were invariably readable and interesting. What pathetic significance lies in his latest communicate utterance: "I thought my fighting days were over, but it doesn't look like it. I have had enough, however, as I am not bloodthirsty." Little did the unfortunate trooper anticipate that his fighting days were actually over, and that he was shortly to pay the heaviest possible price for his valour. On Sunday reference was made to the death of the gallant trooper at Baxenden Wesleyan School, by Mr. Davis, superintendent. Deceased, prior to leaving for South Africa, had regularly attended the school, and was greatly esteemed by all who knew him. Great sympathy is being expressed for the bereaved family, who, until Saturday, were anticipating the ultimate return of the ill-starred trooper.

The Haslingden Guardian, Saturday 29th September 1900
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The Late Trooper Barnes.

HOW A HASLINGDEN LAD DIED.
….In our issue of September 29th, we announced the sad intelligence of the death of Trooper Albert Barnes, son of Mr. George Barnes, of Higher Barn, Haslingden. Particulars as to the manner in which the ill-fated trooper met his death were not then obtainable, but the following letter sent by a comrade of the late trooper, will show that Barnes died most heroically for his country: -
….Krugersdorp, Transvaal, 20th September, 1900. To Mr. George Barnes, Haslingden. Dear sir, - As one of poor Albert's chums I have taken it upon myself to give you some particulars of his sad ending, on the morning of the 18th inst. You will, of course, have seen from the General's report which is cabled home, that he was killed. Our Corps will also send you an official communication.

….One of the duties of the Eastern Province Horse is to provide three men to each of the vedette posts, and on the sad day named, Albert, and two of his comrades, were detailed to the 4th post, which is a very rugged one, and one which affords splendid cover to men lying in ambush. The three poor lads started shortly after daybreak with the others as usual, and had just got to their posts when we were startled by hearing rifle fire at the 4th post (which is about two miles from camp), and saw the horses racing back. Thinking our men had taken cover, every available man saddled up, and within fifteen minutes were at the spot to give them assistance, but unfortunately it was of no avail. I did not go myself, but I heard that the first two found were George Ruddlesden, of Stafford, and G. B. Bennett, of Port Elizabeth, both mortally wounded. They said they were shot down at five yards, and that Albert had got back, but the poor chap was found not 100 yards farther quite dead, and with about eight wounds. The military people will most likely report that they were killed, but they were in reality brutally murdered. This is not the only instance of the deeds of a people who would lead you to believe they are a God-fearing race. This sort of thing makes us feel very bitter against the Boers, and more so when we lose a chum in the above manner. Being ignorant of surgical matters we do not know for certain if the lives of the other two could have been saved, had an ambulance man come out, but it is a fact that an ambulance was sent out without a medico.
….The funeral took place yesterday morning, and it was essentially a military one. The procession was headed by the Royal Welsh Fusiliers drum and fife band, and the firing party. Then came two ambulance waggons, followed by the Colonials only, viz.: Eastern Province Horse, Kimberley Mounted Corps, Marshall's Horse. Each man was buried in a separate grave, and each in a coffin, the graves being covered with flowers from their friends. Of one thing you can rest assured - your son was buried with all Christian rites in the local cemetery, and everything was done that was possible. With deepest sympathy to you all, from his comrades and yours sincerely, C. N. Blaker. P.S. - The Corps are also erecting a cross over each grave.
ANOTHER ACCOUNT.
….Another letter gives the following details: - It appears that Albert was to go with his officer to Ladygrey on duty, but one of his comrades begged him to let him go in his place, as the comrade had a sister in Ladygrey whom he had not seen for some time, and he thought it would be a good chance to see her if Albert would only take his post duty. Albert willingly consented, and it was on the first morning when he was doing sentry duty, while his officer and comrade were on their way to Ladygrey, that poor Albert was shot down along with the other two young fellows. You must look at it in the right light, and bear up under the heavy burden. I firmly believe that God has taken him for some good and wise purpose. He died a brave death and sacrificed his own pleasure, which cost him his life for his comrade.
THE FUNERAL.
….The following is an extract from a South African newspaper: -
….Brave Bayonians. - A correspondent of Krugersdorp writes as follows: - The funerals of the three poor fellows who were killed on Tuesday, took place on Wednesday, the 19th. It was a military funeral and its execution showed the love borne by members of the Eastern Province Horse to their dead comrades, and the sympathy they felt for their relations. Coffins had been made for them with metal plates bearing the names and ages of the three dead men, viz.: A. Barnes, aged 20; Hartley Bennett, 23; George Ruddlestone, 29. The coffins had each a Union Jack, and half-a-dozen wreaths again on that. The Royal Welsh Fusilers' band preceded the ambulance waggon which carried the coffins, then came the firing party, then the main body of the Eastern Province Horse, followed by men of the Kimberley Mounted Corps, and some of Marshall's Horse. Several civilians followed on behind, and so sadly we wended our way to the cemetery, and when l was over, and the bugler sounded the grand salute, and then the last post, many hearts ached for their friends, and the tears ran unbidden as the solemn long-drawn notes rang out. But when the war is over, and the curious stroll round the churchyard, three crosses erected by comrades will still mark the resting places of those who have fallen for their country.

The Haslingden Guardian, Saturday 10th November 1900
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Private Fred Chew

….SUPPOSED HASLINGDEN SOLDIER'S DEATH. - Private F. L. Chew, No. 7388, of the First Lancashire Regiment, is in the list of casualties reported to have died at Heilbron, South Africa, on December 22nd. The name appears in the list of those who have died from disease and wounds. It is feared that the reference is to Private Chew, of Haslingden, who went out from the I Company early in the year, although there is room for hope in the fact that there is a difference in the initials, the Haslingden man's initials being F. W. Private F. W. Chew is 26 years of age, is married, and has one child living. While in Haslingden he worked as a labourer for Mr. Tomlinson, slater.

The Haslingden Guardian, Friday 27th December 1901

….PRIVATE CHEW'S DEATH. - We regret to announce that the report of the death of Private Chew, published in our issue last week, has been fully confirmed, Mrs. Chew having received the death certificate from the War Office on Monday morning. Great sympathy is being felt for the unfortunate widow. The cause of death was enteric fever, under the effects of which the deceased sank in a few days. Private Chew was insured for the sum of £100, through the instrumentality of Captain Halstead, who insured the batch of men who went out to South Africa in February of last year, with the Prudential Insurance Company.

The Haslingden Guardian, Friday 3rd January 1902

….HASLINGDEN SOLDIER'S DEATH. - Official confirmation has now been received at Haslingden of the death from enteric fever at Heilbron on December 22nd of Private F. W. Chew (7388), 1st Lancashire Regiment. Last week we mentioned that the name of "F. L." Chew was supposed to refer to this Haslingden soldier, although there was a mistake in the initial. The surmise has proved to be correct, unfortunately. Private Chew was one of the batch of the I Company Volunteers (Haslingden) who last February left Haslingden preparatory to going to the front. Up to then he had been a labourer for Mr. H. Tomlinson. He was a very popular young man. He was about 26, and leaves a widow and one child. Chew, as well as the other men of the batch who went out in February, was, through Captain Halstead, insured for £100 in the Prudential Co., who have paid over the sum to the widow.

Accrington Observer and Times, Saturday 4th January 1902
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Private Thomas Levitt

….REPORTED DEATH OF A HASLINGDEN SOLDIER. - In the list of losses at Honing Spruit, recorded in yesterday's papers, appears the name of Private T. Levitt, No. 4057, 2nd Lancashire Fusiliers. This unfortunately appears to be Private Tom Levitt, of Haslingden, who has not been heard of since the affair at Spion Kop, and who, it is now reported, was taken prisoner in that engagement, liberated at Pretoria, and killed at the place named on the 22nd inst.

The Haslingden Guardian, Saturday 1st September 1900
www.angloboerwar.com/forum/apow-g/26703-...talana?start=6#52723
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Private Thomas Warburton

….REPORTED DEATH OF A HASLINGDEN SOLDIER. - In yesterday's "Daily Mail," in the list of deaths from disease, the following name occurs: - Bloemfontein: 9017, Private T. Warburton. Enteric fever. June 12th. It appears to be only too certain that the Haslingden soldier of that name is alluded to. Warburton, who was attached to the 3rd East Lancashire Regiment, went out a short time ago from the Militia, after residing at Laburnum-street, Haslingden. He was only about 19 years of age, and great sympathy is being manifested with his bereaved relations.

The Haslingden Guardian, Saturday 16th June 1900
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….One other Haslingden soldier died, but wasn't included on the memorial as he died at Chatham Military Hospital, after being invalided home. He was Private Charles Samuel Wade, Lancashire Fusiliers, died 23rd January 1901, and he was buried at Fort Pitt Military Cemetery, Rochester. .
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Haslingden, Lancashire 1 week 3 days ago #77480

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Berenice,

I was searching for Percy Parker today so this excellent post came in very useful.

Many thanks
David
Dr David Biggins

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