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Boer War memorials in Perth, Australia 8 years 11 months ago #26463

  • Brett Hendey
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My invaluable librarian friend in Perth sent me the following link.
Brett
www.bwm.org.au/site/Boer_War_Day2014.asp#Perth
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Boer War memorials in Perth, Australia 8 years 10 months ago #26517

  • absentminded beggar
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Mr BH, Sir...

Thank you for this Oz website connection. Good to get glimpse of places in the Antipodes where monuments are honored not defaced, memorials are respected not graffiti-daubed and plaques or decorative railings are not plundered for scrap metal to be re-presented in later offerings from Geely, Chery and GWM.

A recent posting #26490 from Mr Adrian 1-6 illustrates the manner, in this neck of the Southern Hemisphere woods, the Rainbow Nation accomodates icons of imperial tyranny not acceptable as part of an ethos of liberated culture. But all this is outside the ABW Forum themepark - n'est-ce pas?

On to things pleasurable and likely to gladden the heart of Mr BerenaceUK in particular. The website whilst not confined to Perth artefacts alone, surprisingly draws no attention to what must be the finest life-sized depiction of mounted troopers anywhere :

One in Brisbane...



and another in Adelaide...



Both courtesy Wikipedia images.
amb
"The greatness of a nation consists not so much in the number of it's people or the extent of it's territory as in the extent and justice of its compassion"
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Boer War memorials in Perth, Australia 1 year 9 months ago #83374

  • Sturgy
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I'm not sure if the Perth Boer War memorial has been posted elsewhere but here it is just in case.......

I have uploaded some photos of the the memorial from the Kings Park Botanical Gardens; we were there for ANZAC day in April '22 and it's an amazing place with so many memorials in such good condition. In front of the memorial is a Krupp field gun captured at Bothaville; eventhough it gets a regular fresh coat of paint you can still make out the ZA coat of arms on the gun itself.

More information:
monumentaustralia.org.au/themes/conflict...n-boer-war-memorial-

Cheers,
Sturgy
Speak my name so that I may live again
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Boer War memorials in Perth, Australia 1 year 9 months ago #83376

  • BereniceUK
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Sturgy wrote: I'm not sure if the Perth Boer War memorial has been posted elsewhere but here it is just in case.......

I have uploaded some photos of the the memorial from the Kings Park Botanical Gardens; we were there for ANZAC day in April '22 and it's an amazing place with so many memorials in such good condition. In front of the memorial is a Krupp field gun captured at Bothaville; eventhough it gets a regular fresh coat of paint you can still make out the ZA coat of arms on the gun itself.

More information:
monumentaustralia.org.au/themes/conflict...n-boer-war-memorial-

Cheers,
Sturgy


Thanks for some great photos there, Sturgy. The date of the laying of the foundation stone was incorrect, it was delayed until the 23rd. The stone must have been incribed before the date.
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THE MEMORIAL TO FALLEN SOLDIERS.
....The laying of the foundation stone of the memorial to fallen soldiers will take place in the Park on Tuesday, instead of to-day, as had been arranged.
The West Australian, Monday 22nd July 1901
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.
FALLEN SOLDIERS' MEMORIAL.
....Of all the functions in which their Royal Highnesses the Duke and Duchess of Cornwall and York will be engaged during their visit to this State, there is none more befitting tho object of their journey to Australia than that in which they will be engaged this afternoon — that is the laying of the foundation-stone of the memorial to the soldiers of this State who have fallen in defence of the Empire. It was in recognition of the great assistance which the Australian States had been to the Motherland, in the struggle with the two South
African Republics, that her late Majesty Queen Victoria desired that her grandson the Duke of York and his Duchess should visit Australia on the occasion of the inauguration of the Commonwealth, which formed the six separate Australian colonies into a single nation. Therefore, as the main object of the Royal visit is to make recognition of the services of the Australian soldiers in South Africa, it is beyond all things appropriate that their Royal Highnesses should play a leading part in the commencement of a memorial to the sons of this State who have fallen in the war. It is unfortunate that so few of the public will be able to witness such an important national event, but perhaps it is unavoidable. No other act of their Royal Highnesses should be so well remembered as this, and yet, probably, it will be the first forgotten, just as the memorial itself, owing to its isolation, will be but little known. Its aim is to perpetuate in the minds of the many the heroism, the bravery, and self-sacrifice of the West Australians who fell in the South African war, but that object cannot be attained with a memorial shrouded in the seclusion, picturesque, undoubtedly, but still the seclusion, of Perth Park, where it will be viewed only by the few.
The Daily News, Tuesday 23rd July 1901
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THE MEMORIAL DESCRIBED.
....The design of the monument is the work of Mr. James White, of Sydney, and was awarded the prize of £20 offered by the committee for the best design. The base of the monument is to be of Meckering granite and freestone, and is surmounted by a group of statuary representing a dismounted soldier, with his bayonet at the "ready," defending a wounded comrade, who is quenching his thirst from his deliverer's water-bottle. The group of statuary will be in marble. Tablets are to be affixed to the four sides of the base, and on these will be inscribed the names of the officers and men who have lost their lives, together with details of the engagements in which they were slain. The height of the memorial will be 20ft., and it will be enclosed with a railing.
....The granite used in the base of the monument is the gift of the Meckering Granite Quarrying Company. When completed, the memorial will cost about £1,000.
....Mr. White has been the prize-winner in many competitions in the Eastern States. He won the £75 prize offered by the Elder Statue Committee in South Australia with his design for the bust of the late Sir Thomas Elder. It was generally conceded in Adelaide that the bust of the deceased philanthropist combined
an excellent likeness with boldness of treatment, which gave force and character to the work. Mr. White was born in Edinburgh in 1862. He studied in his native city and in London and Italy, and some eleven years ago came to Australia, making Sydney his home. He has done a deal of work for the New South Wales Government in connection with the public buildings of the capital, amongst which may be mentioned a colossal group on the building of the Board of Water Supply and Sewerage, in Pitt-street, and statues of explorers in the niches of the Lands Department building. Mr. White also executed the memorial statue, in bronze, of the late Rt. Hon. William Bede Dalley, which stands in Hyde Park. Sydney, the sculptor undertaking the casting himself. This was the first statue in Australia executed by what is known as the "lost wax process."
The Western Mail, Saturday 27th July 1901
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Boer War memorials in Perth, Australia 1 year 9 months ago #83378

  • BereniceUK
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.
.
In Memory of
THE UNDERMENTIONED
OFFICERS, NON-COMMISSIONED OFFICERS & MEN
OF THE
WEST AUSTRALIAN CONTINGENTS
WHO WERE KILLED IN ACTION, OR DIED FROM WOUNDS OR DISEASE
IN
THE WAR IN SOUTH AFRICA, 1899-1902.
.
MAJOR H. G. MOOR, R.A.
LIEUT. A. A. FORREST, LIEUT. G. S. W. HENSMAN,
LIEUT. G. A. MORIS, LIEUT. S. S. REID.
.
SGT. F. F. EDWARDS, FAR. SGT. R. H. McGREGOR, COR. G. N. BISHOP,
COR. W. F. BOLLINGER, COR. R. J. FURLONG, LANCE COR. J. G. DALLISTON.
.
PRIVATES.
T. H. ANGEL, F. T. ADAMS, R. ALDAY, A. BLANCK, W. H. CROSS, M. CONWAY,
W. M. COLLETT, C. C. CLIFFORD, J. DELAHUNTY, W. J. DUNSTAN, H. FORCE,
O. E. FRY, WM. FRASER, B. FISHER, E. A. HAMELY, A. HAMMOND,
J. HUME, E. G. ILES, JAS. KAY, W. J. McPHEE, W. PARKER,
F. PAGE, J. ROSCOE, J. SEMPLE, H. SOLOMON, R. W. SPENCER,
J. B. M. THURSTON, G. WESTCOTT, H. WHITE, T. H. WILSON.
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Boer War memorials in Perth, Australia 1 year 9 months ago #83382

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Particulars of some of the men's deaths.

....By the last mail Major Campbell, the Chief Staff Officer, received a letter from Major Moor, of the first Western Australian contingent, enclosing two others which Major Moor had received from Lance-Corporal Grave Gifford, of the first Western Australian Mounted Infantry, at the Australian Convalescent Depot, Maitland Camp, concerning the death of Lieut. Hensman, at the base hospital. Major Campbell submitted the letters to Mr. Justice Hensman, who consented to their publication.
....Major Moor's communication to Major Campbell, which was dated March 13, read as follows:—"I forward these letters to you, as they contain a great deal of interest to all who knew the late Sergeant Geo. Hensman, and his people, i have no doubt, will care to know their contents.''
....The first of the two letters, by Lance-Corporal Grave Gifford, written from the Australian Convalescent Depot, Maitland Camp, near Capetown, was dated March 6, and was as follows:—"I have the honour to report that Sergeant Hensman continues to do as well as possible in the circumstances. He has undergone two operations, and a considerable quantity of bone has been taken out of his leg. I saw him in Rondebosch Hospital yesterday, when he appeared to be fairly cheerful; but there is no doubt that the continual restraint of having to remain in one position is telling upon him. His temperature only once reached normal, and often gets up as high as 101½, but even this is better than a little over a week ago, when it frequently went up to 103. The doctor still has hopes of being able to save his leg. He desires to be kindly remembered to you, and hopes that the contingent is doing well."
....Lance-Corporal Grave Gifford's second letter from the same place was dated March 13, and was in the following terms:—"It is with extreme pain and regret that I have to inform you of the death of Sergeant Hensman, which took place about 2 a.m. yesterday. I requested Major Keogh, at No. 3 General Hospital, Rondebosch, to inform you by telegraph, through the camp commandant here, and this, I have been informed this morning, has been done. I feel certain that the news will come as a great shock to you. The particulars are as follows:—Dr. Robinson, surgeon, medical officer, who has had charge of the case ever since poor Hensman came down, has done everything in his power to save the leg. He has continually held out hopes to me that this could be done. The patient's high temperature showed that there must have been a great deal of trouble in connection with the shattered bone, and several operations were performed to remove the splinters. I think that these operations must have helped to wear him down, because at the end of last week his strength seemed to fail him rather rapidly. As the last of these operations showed that beyond a doubt there was no hope of saving the limb, and that, in fact, mortification had set in, amputation was necessary. The thigh was amputated on Sunday, 11th inst., at about noon. Hensman was quite resigned to the operation, which was in itself perfectly successful, but the doctor assures me that the shock was too much for him, and, although after he came round he seemed to be getting on all right for a few hours, his strength failed him again about midnight, and he died about 2 o'clock yesterday morning. Dr. Robinson told me he was of a distracted, nervous temperament, and such patients stood amputation less satisfactorily than callous individuals. It is, perhaps, unnecessary to inform you that I am convinced that everything that could possibly be done was done for him. I am aware that Dr. Robinson did not rely merely on his own opinion in this case, but called into consultation all the leading surgeons, both in the No. 3 General Hospital and in the adjoining Duke of Portland Hospital. Hensman was given port at first, and afterwards champagne to keep up his strength while a certain chemical salt was injected into his veins to supply the place of blood. The chaplain, who took the deepest interest in Hensman, is the Rev. Mr. Molyneaux, who may be remembered by you in connection with the Rugby football team which he took to Australia last year. He told me that Hensman knew he was dying at the end. and was glad to have him with him. He told me also that Hensman nearly went off during the operation—he was so weak. I knew of the operation on Sunday, and obtained leave as early as possible on Monday to go and see him. It was then that I learned of his death, and immediately took steps to have you informed. I was allowed to see him. and was shocked to find how terribly he had fallen away since I had last seen him. We have lost a dear comrade. Sir. and I personally have lost about the best friend I had in the world. The funeral was appointed for 5 p.m. yesterday, so I arranged for leave for the Australians to attend. France and myself, of the first Western Australians, and Moran and Woodman, of the second Western Australians, attended. There were also present about five or six men from the Australians who were at the depot, including representatives of the Tasmanian, South Australian, Victorian, and New Zealand contingents, and there was one man of fhe Ceylon Mounted Infantry. The funeral party was furnished from Wynberg by the Warwicks. under the command of an officer. When the three volleys were fired the bugle sounded the 'Last Post.' The first part of the Church of England service was conducted by the Rev. Mr. Molyneaux, in the hospital chapel tent, and the hymn. 'Thy Will Be Done,' was sung by us. Everyone was deeply moved, and I am able to assure you, Sir, that everyone who came into contact with poor Hensman in the hospital looked upon him as a splendid fellow, and felt drawn towards him. . . . The doctor felt certain that the bullet was a dum-dum, or an explosive one of some sort, and that it had most probably been set in verdigris or some other similar poison. This alone would account for 'the worst smash he had ever seen, and the rottenest wound,' in the doctor's words, as proved after amputation. During the operation, I regret to say, Dr. Robinson cut his hand slightly, and has poisoned his arm up to his shoulder, and he is afraid of very serious consequences to himself. Colonel Hensman, his uncle, who is a British military officer on board the American hospital ship Maine, was communicated with by Major Keogh. I have given you all these details in case you are required to inform the relatives, etc. I sympathise with you, Sir, in the loss which the contingent has suffered in the death of our senior sergeant, who, I am well aware, was beloved by all. I tried all over Capetown to get a wreath or two on behalf of the corps, but no flowers could be obtained in the short time. I, however, placed a bunch of oak leaves on the coffin. The funeral took place near the Rondebosch Hospital, between it and the Rondebosch station, a beautiful spot."
The Western Mail, Saturday 5th May 1900


....Major Campbell has received from Privates Dickman and Ashmore, who recently returned from South Africa, an account of the death of Major Moor at Palmeitfontein. Dickman says:—"It was about 3 p.m., and we were very much excited. We had shot down the Boer horses attached to a gun, and were anxious to take the gun. I was on the right when my horse was shot under me. Major Moor called out to me, 'Follow me to the left cover.' About 50 yards further on the enemy fired a volley at us from about 30 yards distant, and he and I dropped. I was on foot at the time. Eighteen horses were shot. Privates Wheeler and Hutchison carried Major Moor from out of the line of fire, although he asked them to leave him alone, believing that as he was mortally wounded they would be better employed in attending to those who were less hurt. Sergeant Edwards asked Major Moor whether he had anything to say, but he replied, 'No, I have prepared everything before hand.' He was terribly wounded in the hip and side by an explosive bullet, and he lived for about a quarter of an hour afterwards without showing auy outward signs of pain."
....Private Ashmore, who was Major Moor's galloper, confirms the account given by Private Dickman, and adds that just before they got to the top of the ridge occupied by the Boers Major Moor sent him to question a Kaffir, whom they saw driving cattle in the valley, as to which way the enemy had gone. He was unable to come up with the Kaffir. When he returned he found Major Moor in the open on one knee firing. He ordered his men to move lo the left for cover, and Ashmore was immediately struck. A short time afterwards Dickman and Moor fell together.
The Western Mail, Saturday 17th November 1900....Major Moor was from Truro, Cornwall.


Richard Joseph Furlong and Herbert Abraham Solomon were from Northam, W.A., both killed at Reitfontein, and there's a memorial tablet to their memory in the porch at St John's Church, Northam. It's in the porch, not the church, because Solomon was Jewish. His brother, Bert Solomon, served in South Africa with the 1st Bushmen's Contingent.


Bert Alday and Dalliston were both killed in the same action, and Hammond was mortally wounded. The first two were interred at Roodebank.
...." . . . a march was made on the night of 1st February; this march proved to be a very unsuccessful one for us. In the morning at daybreak a party of our men set after three Boers who tried hard to effect an escape. Six of our men were in hot pursuit, one being so close as to call upon a Boer to surrender. The Boer, seeing that the man was uuable to use his rifle, the bolt being twisted, turned in the saddle and fired, hitting our man in the arm, thus putting him out of action. The other five were now close upon him, including a veterinary surgeon (unarmed). The Boer seeing escape almost impossible, threw himself off his horse, but before this could be done Private Hammond had collided with the enemy, but was unable to shoot him; Hammond was immediately shot through the groin and fell to the ground. The next shot was fired at the vet., and grazed the skin on his stomach, he also collided, and at the same time roared, "Don't fire, I'm unarmed." The Boer's attention was then drawn to the three remaining; he was now on the ground and, taking steady aim, fired two shots at each man. Lance-Corporal Dalison fell to the ground, dead, with a bullet through each nipple of the breast, then Private Alday fell from his horse, dead, with a bullet through the heart; the last man, Private Crooneen, bringing up the rear, seeing that he was in danger, threw himself off his horse, but found that the bolt of his rifle was also twisted and. that he was unable to shoot for a minute or so, until he found what was the matter, took cover under his horse. The shot fired at him hit the animal through the shoulder; two other horses were killed. Thus one Boer killed three men, namely, Hammond (who died next day), Dalison and Alday, wounded one, captured the vet., killed two horses and wounded one, and coolly rode away, taking the vet's horse and another one. Support came too late, and the Boer made good his escape. The weapon used was a deadly one. A Mauser pistol, which has a maxim action, pull the trigger and hold it fast, the ten shots will go off one after another as quick as lightning, the emply cases fly out, during each recoil, so quickly that not a glimpse of them is perceptible. This is a very handy weapon. The case is of wood, which can be attached to the handle of the pistol, and thus forms a carbine, to be fired from the shoulder, reaching to 1,000 yards. Dalison and Alday were buried that evening, the funeral being most impressive. The two bodies were carried on stretchers side by side, the pall bearers being man of equal rank. All. the W.A.'s following in the rear, with detachments from the 18th and 19th Hussars. A fence was erected round the graves, while two crosses and a tree at the head of each mark the spot where our comrades are laid low. Our troubles were not yet over, for two days later, during a chase after a cammando of some 800 Boers, Lieutenant Morris, late private in the first contingent, was shot dead; the bullet entered his chin and passed through the back of his head.
Mount Magnet Miner, Saturday 10th May 1902
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