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August 14th 9 years 2 months ago #5020

  • djb
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1900 - De Wet escapes through Olifant's Nek. Strathcona's Horse enter Carolina.
1906 - Amnesty Bill passed by Cape Government.
Dr David Biggins

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Re: August 14th 9 years 2 months ago #5025

  • Frank Kelley
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Good morning David,
You forgot to add the word "Again" between the words, escapes and through! :evil:
Regards Frank.

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Re: August 14th 2 months 1 week ago #77935

  • BereniceUK
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1900 - The departure from Liverpool of Canadian troops being invalided home.

....There was unusual excitement yesterday at the departure of the R.M.S. Lake Ontario, from Liverpool to Montreal. A large number of the passengers were Canadian troops who had been invalided home from South Africa. After being on furlough in different parts of England, some for several months, and others for a few weeks, they were drawn together and sent to Liverpool, and departed yesterday in a body for their native country. They numbered 120, most of them belonging to the Royal Canadian Rifles and the 1st and 2nd Canadian Mounted Rifles, and a few to Strathcona's Horse. A large crowd gathered on the Prince's Landing-stage to witness the embarkation in the afternoon.

Prince's Landing Stage

A few of the men, who had arrived in Liverpool on the previous night, went on board considerably before 4 o'clock, but the main portion arrived at Riverside Station by the 4 10 express. Just before the train came in the Lord Mayor (Mr. Louis S. Cohen) drove up to the stage, wearing his chain of office. He was acomapanied by Mr. W. J. Davey, of the firm of Elder, Dempster, and Co., and mounted the gangway amidst loud cheers from the spectators and the large crowd of passengers lining the vessel's sides. Among the latter were several members of the Canadian Bisley Team, they being Commander Lieut.-Colonel Delamere (Queen's Own Regiment, Toronto), Major F. S. Mackay (65th Regiment, Montreal), Major and Adjutant Thompson, Lieut. J. Lamont, Lieut. W. A. M'Crimmon (7th Fusiliers, London, Ontario), and Lieut. D. G. C. Munro (44th Regiment, Thorold). The band of the 2nd V.B.K.L.R. took up their position on board, and played patriotic selections pending the arrival of the Canadian soldiers by the train. Shortly after the time due the train steamed into the station, and amidst enthusiasm the invalided men formed in line on the stage, and waited the order of Captain Strachan, the chief embarkation officer at Liverpool. Although they were all dresed in a very rough and ready fashion, some with forage caps, others in slouch hats, some with and others without leggings, they were all in khaki and presented a fine appearance. They all looked good-humoured and happy, and not a bit like invalids, although at least one amongst them could boast of no fewer than eleven gunshot wounds. The only officer with them was Colour-Sergeant Eustace. The band struck up a lively tune as the men ascended the gangway. Captain Eliot, Admiralty transport officer, was on board preparing for their reception, and it is understood that Lieut.-Colonel Delamere will take charge of them on the voyage.
....After more music, more cheers, and hand-shaking, the men assembled amidships on tbe port side, and the Lord Mayor, addressing them, said he considered himself very fortunate in being able to come and say goodbye to them. He had often been down during last year to see troops off, but on all occasions his mission had made him feel sad. He knew that their brave fellows were going to fight a foe worthy of their steel, and Heaven only knew who would come back. They were the first body of men he had welcomed back, and he was sorry that circumstances had not allowed him to give them a welcome at the Town Hall of Liverpool. They were going home invalided. They had none the less served their Queen and country. (Applause.) He knew a hearty welcome awaited them over the sea in Canada. One of the most strking features of this present campaign had been the consolidation of the empire over which our noble Queen holds sway. What tremendous enthusiasm had been aroused amongst Canadians, Australians (and an Australian he was himself)—(Applause.)—New Zealanders, and others, and it must have gladdened the heart of the Queen to know that Britishers, wherever they were, were willing to shed their blood for the honour and glory of the English flag. Not one branch of the service had done this in a higher degree than the Canadians. (Applause.) They were going back to Canada, a country full of natural resources, and of high-minded and noble English subjects. He hoped they would tell their friends at home that England deeply appreciated the enthusiastic patriotism of her colonies, and of the practical evidence of their desire to share in England's misfortunes and to participate in her joys. He said they never had any fear as to the final result of the war. Tha main issues had been fought, and they hoped for peace at any moment. They had been taught some useful lessons, and in spite of disappointments and depressions, they had now fought successfully a justifiable war. He hoped there were happy times in store for the Boers—(laughter)—and when they settled down they would find it was even better to be under the sway of Queen Victoria than under Mr. Kruger. (Laughter.) He now wished them God-speed and a pleasant voyage. Concluding, the Lord Mayor called for three cheers for the Queen, which was accorded with enthusiasm. After cheers had been given for the Lord Mayor, the large crowd on the stage gave ringing cheers for the Canadians. As soon as these had died away, Lieutenant-Colonel Delamere, on behalf of the Canadians, acknowledged the reception which had been accorded them at Liverpool. The time drawing near for the vessel to sail, a hearty farewell was bidden, and immediately those not outward bound climbed down the gangway.
....One of the Canadians, in the course of a short conversation, volunteered the information that when he was taken ill he found his way into the Winburg Hospital, Bloemfontein, and he was not satisfied at his treatment there by any means. Asked for the reason, he said the orderlies were too intent upon looking after themselves. Others, on being questioned on the same subject, declared that they had no fault to find with the hospital arrangements, either at the base or in the field. One said he "did not expect to get comfort on a battlefield." They all agreed that the work done by the Australian nurses was admirable, one remarking that he would never forget the self-denial and untiring patience of Sister Watts and others like her, who worked 15 hours a day without a murmur under all kinds of trying conditions. The hero of the party was undoubtedly Private Kennedy, who had received the eleven gunshot wounds. He is a broad-backed, good-humoured giant, who looked as if nothing would kill him. Despite having had an expansive bullet in the neck and one in the leg and nine other bullet wounds, he looked well and hearty and none the worse for his rough experience.
Liverpool Mercury, Wednesday 15th August 1900


1902 - Trooper Morris, of the 91st (Sharpshooters) Company Imperial Yeomanry, returned home to West Wales.

....Mr Griffith Morris, of Clynderwen, who has seen a good deal of active service in South Africa, arrived home on Thursday, and was warmly welcomed by his father and many friends at Clynderwen Station. Morris was one of the fortunate three belonging to the detachment of the 91st Imperial Yeomanry, under Colonel Damant, who escaped without hurt, when all their comrades were slain at Tafel Kop. He has since that event had three horses killed under him.
The Carmarthen Weekly Reporter, Friday 22nd August 1902
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August 14th 2 months 6 days ago #77963

  • Moranthorse1
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Private Kennedy's story is incredible having survived eleven gunshot wounds including the expansive to the neck!
Thanks for posting.

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August 14th 2 months 6 days ago #77965

  • QSAMIKE
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One of the Canadians, in the course of a short conversation, volunteered the information that when he was taken ill he found his way into the Winburg Hospital, Bloemfontein, and he was not satisfied at his treatment there by any means. Asked for the reason, he said the orderlies were too intent upon looking after themselves. Others, on being questioned on the same subject, declared that they had no fault to find with the hospital arrangements, either at the base or in the field. One said he "did not expect to get comfort on a battlefield." They all agreed that the work done by the Australian nurses was admirable, one remarking that he would never forget the self-denial and untiring patience of Sister Watts and others like her, who worked 15 hours a day without a murmur under all kinds of trying conditions.

Bereniece

This is brought up in the next section of the Lynn Diary where he complains about his treatment in Hospital..... He was due to go home but refused to do so.....

Mike
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August 14th 2 months 6 days ago #77968

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Moranthorse1 wrote: Private Kennedy's story is incredible having survived eleven gunshot wounds including the expansive to the neck!
Thanks for posting.


If you look at August 10th Private Kennedy had only nine bullet wounds then!
www.angloboerwar.com/forum/16-on-this-da...59-august-10th#77874

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