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July 16th 9 years 4 months ago #4587

  • djb
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1900 - De Wet engaged with Paget and Broadwood. Hutton in action at Witpoort.
Dr David Biggins

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July 16th 4 months 3 weeks ago #77420

  • BereniceUK
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1901 - Death of Thomas Yates, 4th Victorian Imperial Contingent.


....Trooper Thos. Yates, of Colac, one of the men who returned from South Africa by the Orient, died yesterday at the Melbourne Hospital. Trooper Yates, with a comrade, had been occupying a room at the Farmers' Club Hotel, and had been suffering from a cold, which he complained of on Friday. On Sunday night he grew worse, and was seized with fits of vomiting. He was taken to the Melbourne Hospital, where he died, as stated above. An inquest will be held.
The Age [Melbourne], Wednesday 17th July 1901


....The medical evidence showed that death was due to uraemic poisoning, from kidney disease which was possibly accelerated by an overdose of cough mixture supplied by a local chemist. The dose prescribed was not harmful and there was no blame attributable to the chemist who made up the mixture.
The Argus [Melbourne], Friday 26th July 1901


SAD DEATH OF TROOPER YATES.

A MILITARY FUNERAL.
....Unfeigned regret was expressed in Colac on Tuesday afternoon, when the news was circulated that Trooper Yates, who had just returned to Melbourne from South Africa, was no more. He arrived by the Orient in company with Corporal Pooley and Troopers O'Brien and Craig, being met by his mother and local people on the arrival of the steamer. He was apparently in the best of health, attending the races at Flemington on Saturday, and remained so until Sunday evening, when he was taken suddenly ill, vomiting severely, and had to be taken to the Melbourne Hospital, where he kept gradually sinking until he passed away on Tuesday afternoon. The deceased, who was 27 years of age, was a son of Mr and Mrs Wm. Yates, of Colac East. He was a fine, powerful young man, and to use a colloquial phrase, "every inch a gentleman." He worked for Mr W. St. L. Robertson, Mr W. Kirk and others, and they speak in the hiighest terms of him. He was one of the most sturdy and healthiest soldiers in the contingent, did a lot of work in South Africa, and his death under such painful circumstances is to be deeply regretted. Much sympathy has been expressed for the bereaved parents, who have had a far too considerable share of this world's grief and sorrow. A post mortem examination disclosed the fact that the cause of death was kidney disease, probably accelerated by medicine containing opium. His remains were brought to Colac yesterday morning, and in the afternoon the deceased was accorded a military funeral, which was largely attended. Major Robin was in command, and the order of the cortege was---Mounted rifles (under Sergeant Doherty), with arms reversed; cadets (under Major Robin and Lieutenant Johnston), and the Colac Brass Band (under the leadership of Mr Chas. James.) "The Dead March in Saul" was played by the band en route. The coffin was covered with a Union Jack, and it was borne from the cemetery gate to the grave by Corporal Pooley, Buglers Gazzard and Armstrong (Warrnambool) and Private Prosser. A firing party from the mounted rifles fired three volleys over the deceased's remains, while the buglers played "The Last Post." There were a number of floral tributes, including three beautiful ones subscribed by his former companions in Colac.
The Colac Herald, Friday 19th July 1901
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July 16th 4 months 3 weeks ago #77432

  • LinneyI
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Berenice
According to OZ-Boer, "253 Pte. Thomas Yates" served with the Victorian Imperial Contingent; was born 1875, occupation being a Groom, from Malvern, Victoria. He died just four days after his return in circumstances as related in the Melbourne Argus. Remembered amongst others on a brass tablet in the Colac Free Library (Victoria), he was recalled as being "every inch a soldier" and at a concert at the Council Hall, a commemorative gold medal named to Pte Thomas Yates was presented the brother of the deceased.
The usual clasps awarded to the 4th Victorians were Cape Colony, Rhodesia, Orange Free State, Transvaal and South Africa 1901. However, many such clasps were issued much later.
I understand that at that time (and for some time before and afterwards), medicines containing various amounts of opium were commonly available.
Regards
IL.

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July 16th 4 months 3 weeks ago #77433

  • Elmarie
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Colac Boer War Memorial, Victoria Australia

Elmarie Malherbe
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July 16th 4 months 3 weeks ago #77434

  • BereniceUK
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The brass memorial tablet, which was in the porch of Colac Free Library, was unveiled on Thursday 26th June 1902. The present library is a modern building, so I'm trying to find out if the plaque still exists.

* The Free Library, opened on the 12th of September 1901, was built to commemorate the declaration of peace in South Africa the year before.

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