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Boer food 1 month 3 weeks ago #77623

  • BereniceUK
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From 1900 . . .

....The instinct of good feeding is inherent in the Boer character. In a great many cases it is impossible for him to indulge his predilection because of his poverty, his isolation from markets, and the scarcity of provisions.
....But if he has the opportunity he feeds well and often—certainly far better than a man in a like position in England. This must not be taken, however, as typical of the average country Boer, but rather of the domestic arrangements of the better class, educated Pretoria officials and the like.
....They are very fond of sweetmeats in every shape and form, and are exceedingly clever at home-made preserves. Tangerines or naartjes are a very common fruit, and a preserve called 'naartje comfyt' is quite excellent. The fruit is preserved whole, with sugar and syrup, and has an exquisite aroma peculiarly its own. There is an excellent kind of cake called 'moss bolletjes,' made of grapes or raisins and 'mos,' which is the juice of the grape in its first stages of fermentation. During the wine-making season in parts of the Cape Colony this is commonly used instead of yeast by the country folks for buns and such like.
chestofbooks.com/food/recipes/South-Afri...ld-Dutch-Recipe.html
....An old Dutch sweetmeat is called 'koesisters,' and is made of flour, sugar, spices, eggs, butter, and yeast. They are dipped in syrup and dried. Their particular excellence lies in the fact that if they are properly made they will keep for months. 'Honing kock' is just honey cake, and is very sweet and rich ; it is flavored with brandy, and is not unlike the French pain d'epices. 'Mebos' is a very common and universally-appreciated preparation of dried and salted apricots. They are dried in the hot sun, then flattened out and the stone extracted, crystalized sugar and salt are sprinkled over them, and they are stored for winter use. Many people declare that 'mebos' is an efficacious remedy for seasickness. 'Rys kluitjes' are simple rice dumplings, which are usually eaten with curry or with boiled corned beef, and they form an excellent accompaniment to sweet potatoes, which are a luxury in themselves.
fatimasydow.co.za/2019/08/25/koesisters/
....A very excellent form of chicken pie is called 'ouderwetse pastel.' It is an elaborate sort of dish, with spices, onions, wine, lemon, eggs, and ham. It is, however, exceedingly toothsome, and might with advantage be added to an English bill of fare. A typical Boer dish is called 'sasaties,' or 'kabobs,' and is probably derived from a Malay origin. This consists of a leg of mutton cut up into little squares, fried, curried, and then grilled on skewers. It may, perhaps, somewhat suggest the homely cat's meat, but it is very good indeed, and there is a great deal of local color about this most appetizing dish.
....'Swartzuir' is made of ribs of mutton with spices and tamarinds. Some old recipes recommend the use of the blood of a duck instead of tamarinds. A favorite sweet is 'tamelettjes,' which is principally sugar flavored with almonds and tangerine peel. 'Zoete kockies' are tea biscuits, rather sweet and rich. A peculiar ingredient in their composition, according to our ideas, is sheep tail fat.
chestofbooks.com/food/recipes/South-Afri...omely-Cape-Dish.html
....In South Africa there is a peculiar breed of sheep with broad, fat tails, which make excellent soup, and which are also used for other delicacies, as in the above-mentioned 'cookies.' Blatjang is a hot condiment made with chilies, and is an extremely agreeable adjunct to cold meat. 'Bobotee' is a species of Indian curry, and 'brood kluitjes' are bread dumplings, which are served with soup or stewed chicken.
....'Boontjes bredee' is a dry bean stew. A 'bredee' is a sort of stew in which anything may be put with advantage—quinces, for instances, or tomatoes. In some parts of South Africa, it is called 'brady,' but 'bredee' is the correct Dutch spelling.
....'Gesmoorde hoender' sounds rather appalling, but is othing more than chicken fried with onions, spice, and chilies. 'Wentel jeeftjes' are a sort of pancake, but crispier and more devoursome. 'Wafels' are wafers, such as one gets in Switzerland and some parts of France.
....The most typical Boer food of all is purposely left until the last. This is 'biltong,' the provender of the Boer on the veldt, and the most sustaining form of dried meat ever invented. The beef or venison must be cut from out the hind leg of the animal from the thigh bone down to the knee joint. It is salted, salt-petred, pressed and dried in the sun and the wind. It will keep any length of time, and for eating it is shredded with a pocket knife.—London Mail.
The Evening Telegram [St. John's, Newfoundland], Wednesday 28th February 1900


How to make moss bolletjes, and you have a choice of languages!

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The following user(s) said Thank You: Brett Hendey, QSAMIKE, Moranthorse1

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Boer food 1 month 3 weeks ago #77624

  • QSAMIKE
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Thanks Berenice...... Since I love to cook, (smoking a Brisket right now) and have 2 South African Grocery Shops / Markets here in the city will have to go and have a really good look at the recipes and see what I can throw together......

Mike
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Past-President Calgary
Military Historical Society
O.M.R.S. 1591

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Boer food 1 month 3 weeks ago #77625

  • BereniceUK
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Good luck. Let us know how you get on.

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