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TOPIC: Boer flag captured by a Grenadier Guard at Belmont

Boer flag captured by a Grenadier Guard at Belmont 1 month 1 week ago #60773

  • BereniceUK
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A report of 1902's annual inspection of the Cardiff Police Force included the piece below, relating to a Private John Lewis, who confusingly also seems to be referred to in the article by the name Price.

Does anyone know if the flag is still held by the Grenadier Guards?

An African Hero Honoured.
During the war twelve of the men who were reservists in various regiments have seen service in South Africa, and four are still in that country. Six have rejoined the police force. One (Police-constable Tarr) died of enteric fever, and another (Police-constable Johnson) was accidentally shot. An interesting souvenir of the gallantry displayed by Police-constable John Lewis, who was a private in No. 2 Company of the Grenadier Guards. It consisted of a photograph of a Boer flag which he took at the battle of Belmont. It was, in fact, the only flag taken from the enemy in action. When the guards charged the first kopje at Belmont, Price saw a Boer bearing a flag about four yards away and promptly shot him. The trophy he presented to Major Glichen, who was in command of his company, and heard nothing more of the matter until he came with the last batch of reservists. So greatly did the officers of the battalion appreciate the capture of the flag that they presented Police-constable Price with a photograph of it and a purse containing £10. At the top of the photograph are the words: "Boer flag taken in action by Private No. 5693 John Lewis, No. 2 Company 3rd Battalion Grenadier Guards, at the battle of Belmont, 23rd November 1899." At the foot is the following inscription: - "Presented to Private John Lewis by the officers of the Grenadier Guards, 1902." Police-constable Lewis went out with one of the first batches of reservists, and served throughout the war with credit.

Evening Express, Friday 25th July 1902

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Boer flag captured by a Grenadier Guard at Belmont 1 month 1 week ago #60828

  • Frank Kelley
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The enemy flag was being carried "four yards away" no chance of missing the unfortunate Boer then!

BereniceUK wrote: A report of 1902's annual inspection of the Cardiff Police Force included the piece below, relating to a Private John Lewis, who confusingly also seems to be referred to in the article by the name Price.

Does anyone know if the flag is still held by the Grenadier Guards?

An African Hero Honoured.
During the war twelve of the men who were reservists in various regiments have seen service in South Africa, and four are still in that country. Six have rejoined the police force. One (Police-constable Tarr) died of enteric fever, and another (Police-constable Johnson) was accidentally shot. An interesting souvenir of the gallantry displayed by Police-constable John Lewis, who was a private in No. 2 Company of the Grenadier Guards. It consisted of a photograph of a Boer flag which he took at the battle of Belmont. It was, in fact, the only flag taken from the enemy in action. When the guards charged the first kopje at Belmont, Price saw a Boer bearing a flag about four yards away and promptly shot him. The trophy he presented to Major Glichen, who was in command of his company, and heard nothing more of the matter until he came with the last batch of reservists. So greatly did the officers of the battalion appreciate the capture of the flag that they presented Police-constable Price with a photograph of it and a purse containing £10. At the top of the photograph are the words: "Boer flag taken in action by Private No. 5693 John Lewis, No. 2 Company 3rd Battalion Grenadier Guards, at the battle of Belmont, 23rd November 1899." At the foot is the following inscription: - "Presented to Private John Lewis by the officers of the Grenadier Guards, 1902." Police-constable Lewis went out with one of the first batches of reservists, and served throughout the war with credit.

Evening Express, Friday 25th July 1902

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