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Belmont 4 months 2 weeks ago #74779

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Belmont is a small village in north west Cape Colony, close to the border with the Orange Free State.

As Lord Methuen marched his force towards the relief of Kimberley, Belmont was the location of a battle on 23rd November 1899.

Conan-Doyle takes up the story:

At the dawn of Wednesday, November 22nd, Lord Methuen moved forward until he came into touch with the Boer position at Belmont. It was surveyed that evening by Colonel Willoughby Verner, and every disposition made to attack it in the morning.

The force of the Boers was much inferior to our own, some two or three thousand in all, but the natural strength of their position made it a difficult one to carry, while it could not be left behind us as a menace to our line of communications. A double row of steep hills lay across the road to Kimberley, and it was along the ridges, snuggling closely among the boulders, that our enemy was waiting for us. In their weeks of preparation they had constructed elaborate shelter pits in which they could lie in comparative safety while they swept all the level ground around with their rifle fire. Mr. Ralph, the American correspondent, whose letters were among the most vivid of the war, has described these lairs, littered with straw and the debris of food, isolated from each other, and each containing its grim and formidable occupant. 'The eyries of birds of prey' is the phrase with which he brings them home to us. In these, with nothing visible but their peering eyes and the barrels of their rifles, the Boer marksmen crouched, and munched their biltong and their mealies as the day broke upon the morning of the 23rd. With the light their enemy was upon them.

It was a soldiers' battle in the good old primeval British style, an Alma on a small scale and against deadlier weapons. The troops advanced in grim silence against the savage-looking, rock-sprinkled, crag-topped position which confronted them. They were in a fierce humour, for they had not breakfasted, and military history from Agincourt to Talavera shows that want of food wakens a dangerous spirit among British troops. A Northumberland Fusilier exploded into words which expressed the gruffness of his comrades. As a too energetic staff officer pranced before their line he roared in his rough North-country tongue, 'Domn thee! Get thee to hell, and let's fire!' In the golden light of the rising sun the men set their teeth and dashed up the hills, scrambling, falling, cheering, swearing, gallant men, gallantly led, their one thought to close with that grim bristle of rifle-barrels which fringed the rocks above them.

Lord Methuen's intention had been an attack from front and from flank, but whether from the Grenadiers losing their bearings, or from the mobility of the Boers, which made a flank attack an impossibility, it is certain that all became frontal. The battle resolved itself into a number of isolated actions in which the various kopjes were rushed by different British regiments, always with success and always with loss. The honours of the fight, as tested by the grim record of the casualty returns, lay with the Grenadiers, the Coldstreams, the Northumberlands, and the Scots Guards. The brave Guardsmen lay thickly on the slopes, but their comrades crowned the heights. The Boers held on desperately and fired their rifles in the very faces of the stormers. One young officer had his jaw blown to pieces by a rifle which almost touched him. Another, Blundell of the Guards, was shot dead by a wounded desperado to whom he was offering his water-bottle. At one point a white flag was waved by the defenders, on which the British left cover, only to be met by a volley. It was there that Mr. E. F. Knight, of the 'Morning Post,' became the victim of a double abuse of the usages of war, since his wound, from which he lost his right arm, was from an explosive bullet. The man who raised the flag was captured, and it says much for the humanity of British soldiers that he was not bayoneted upon the spot. Yet it is not fair to blame a whole people for the misdeeds of a few, and it is probable that the men who descended to such devices, or who deliberately fired upon our ambulances, were as much execrated by their own comrades as by ourselves.

The victory was an expensive one, for fifty killed and two hundred wounded lay upon the hillside, and, like so many of our skirmishes with the Boers, it led to small material results. Their losses appear to have been much about the same as ours, and we captured some fifty prisoners, whom the soldiers regarded with the utmost interest. They were a sullen slouching crowd rudely clad, and they represented probably the poorest of the burghers, who now, as in the middle ages, suffer most in battle, since a long purse means a good horse. Most of the enemy galloped very comfortably away after the action, leaving a fringe of sharpshooters among the kopjes to hold back our pursuing cavalry. The want of horsemen and the want of horse artillery are the two reasons which Lord Methuen gives why the defeat was not converted into a rout. As it was, the feelings of the retreating Boers were exemplified by one of their number, who turned in his saddle in order to place his outstretched fingers to his nose in derision of the victors. He exposed himself to the fire of half a battalion while doing so, but he probably was aware that with our present musketry instruction the fire of a British half-battalion against an individual is not a very serious matter.


The account from Times History: www.angloboerwar.com/images/pdf/TimesHistory02-09.pdf

The account from Bennett's With Methuen's Column: www.angloboerwar.com/books/134-bennett-w...28-bennett-section-3

Wilson's account from With the Flag to Pretoria: www.angloboerwar.com/books/206-wtftp/338...rd-methuen-s-advance

Finally, Maurice's account: www.angloboerwar.com/books/92-maurice-hi...ter-xiii-belmont-154
Dr David Biggins
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Belmont 4 months 2 weeks ago #74780

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Source: Forbes' 19th Century Battles
Dr David Biggins
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Belmont 4 months 2 weeks ago #74781

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Pictures from a visit some years ago to Belmont.


The railway station


View from the railway station


View to Mont Blanc


Thomas' Farm
Dr David Biggins
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Belmont 4 months 2 weeks ago #74782

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Map of the battle from the Times History.

Dr David Biggins
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Belmont 4 months 2 weeks ago #74783

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The grave of Lt Wilfrid Astley Blundell-Hollinshead-Blundell.



Dooner writes: He died of wounds received in action at Belmont, November 23rd, 1899. He was the eldest son of Canon Blundell-Hollinshead-Blundell of Halsall. He was born in May 1871, and educated at Eton. He entered the Grenadier Guards in 1892, being promoted Lieutenant February 1897. The author of "The Great Boer War" writes, that Lieutenant Blundell was shot by a wounded Boer to whom he was offering his water bottle. The Times History of the War, however, mentions that whether the wounded Boer fired "from deliberate treachery or in an unreasoning agony of fear and terror, it is impossible to say".
Dr David Biggins
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Belmont 4 months 2 weeks ago #74785

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A more up to date picture of the headstone for WA B-H-B taken in the West End Cemetery, Kimberley.

Dr David Biggins
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