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Unusual medal combinations that include a QSA 7 months 2 weeks ago #93023

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The GCB, GCVO group to Admiral Kelly sold for a reasonable hammer price of GBP 6,000 at Spink this week. Totals: GBP 7,728. R 176,280. AUD 14,170. NZD 15,220. CAD 12,750. USD 9,450. EUR 8,680

The pair to Private Bentley sold for the same hammer price.
Dr David Biggins

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Unusual medal combinations that include a QSA 3 weeks 4 hours ago #96055

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Picture courtesy of Noonan's

DSO GV;
DSC GV HM 1915, engraved ‘Captain F. Summers D.S.C.’;
BSACM reverse Matabeleland 1893, no clasp (Troopr. F. Summers, Victoria Column.);
QSA (2) Cape Colony, Wittebergen (Lieut. F. Summers. 53 Co. Impl. Yeo.);
1914 Star, with clasp (Temp. Lieut. F. Summers, R.M. Brigade);
British War and Victory Medals, with MID (Lt. Col. F. Summers.)

DSO London Gazette 1 January 1917: ‘Temporary Major, Machine Gun Corps.’
DSC London Gazette 1 January 1916: ‘Temporary Captain, Royal Marines. For services with the Royal Naval Division Motor Transport Company in France.’
MID London Gazette 1 January 1916 and 4 January 1917.

Frank Summers served as a Trooper in the B.S.A. Company’s Police during the Matabele Rebellion of 1893, and also acted as a Correspondent for Reuters whilst attached to the Victoria Column. He served during the Boer War as a Lieutenant in the Royal East Kent Yeomanry and was mentioned in despatches. In 1914 Summers volunteered himself and his motor car for service with the Royal Naval Division in Belgium and France, there being a chronic shortage of transport at this time. He was Adjutant of the Royal Marine Motor Transport Company which was formed in September 1914 and disbanded in August 1915. They were employed in transporting troops in every direction as the great move to cover the Channel ports was taking place, and they were very active during the 1st and 2nd battles of Ypres, at Aubers Ridge and at Festubert. Two of its officers were decorated, Captain H. M. Leaf, R.M., with the D.S.O., and Captain Frank Summers with the D.S.C.

After serving in France, Summers went to the Dardanelles with the Royal Naval Air Service, probably in armoured cars. His Royal Marine commission was terminated on 27 March 1916, when he transferred to the Army as a Major in the Heavy Branch of the Machine Gun Corps, cover name for the first tank unit, and which later became known as the Tank Corps. He trained and led the original “D” Company of tanks in the attack on Flers-Courcelette on the Somme, 15 September 1916, the first ‘official’ occasion on which tanks were used in the War. However, one of Summers’ “D” Tanks had carried out a lone reconnaissance on the day before, so there can be no doubt that it was one of his tanks that was the first ever to go into action. On 19 November he was in command of three tank companies in the attack on Cambrai. Although the award of his DSO in January 1917 does not carry a citation, there can be little doubt that it was made in recognition of his services on the Somme. He was promoted to Lieutenant-Colonel in the Tank Corps in November 1916 and commanded the 6th Tank Battalion from January to December 1917. Later in the War he served with the British Military Mission in Washington and lecturing at the War College on tank tactics. Whilst in Washington he met with the young Dwight D. Eisenhower, also a tank specialist and destined to become 34th President of the USA.
Dr David Biggins
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Unusual medal combinations that include a QSA 2 weeks 1 day ago #96123

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Picture courtesy of Noonan's

CBE (Civil, 2nd type) with Military Division neck riband;
DSC GV, HM 1918, the reverse very lightly scratched ‘Fall’;
QSA (3) Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Transvaal, with unofficial top retaining rod (1967 Tpr: E. Fall. S.A. Lt. Horse.);
1914-15 Star (Lieut. E. M. Fall. R.N.R.);
British War and Victory Medals (Lieut. E. M. Fall. R.N.R.);
1939-45 Star;
Atlantic Star;
Burma Star, (1) Pacific;
War Medal 1939-45;
RD GV HM 1922;
Liverpool Shipwreck and Humane Society, Marine Medal, 3rd type, silver (To Ernest M. Fall. For Gallant Service. 15/11/1938.) with integral top brooch bar;
United States of America, Legion of Merit, Commander’s neck badge, gilt and enamel, unnamed as issued, with full neck riband;.

Together with the related miniature awards for all except the CBE and Legion of Merit, these mounted as worn [the 1914-15 Star represented by a 1914 Star, and the Burma Star lacking the Pacific clasp but with rosette on riband instead].

CBE (Civil) London Gazette 1 January 1943: ‘Captain Ernest Matson Fall, D.S.C., R.D., R.N.R. (Retd.), Master, Merchant Navy.

DSC London Gazette 24 March 1919: ‘For services in Minesweeping Operations between 1 July and 31 December 1918.’

United States of America, Legion of Merit, Commander London Gazette 25 August 1950. The official citation, dated 14 December 1948, states: ‘Captain Fall, Royal Naval Reserve, Retired, performed exceptionally meritorious services as Master of HMT Queen Elizabeth and HMT Queen Mary from August 1942 to December 1945. He contributed immeasurably to the successful prosecution of World War II by the United States, in transporting under hazardous conditions more than one-half million American troops to and from the theaters of war. Captain Fall's navigating skill, his tireless energy and his unflagging devotion to duty over long periods of time made possible the safe and swift transportation of unprecedented concentrations of human lives at sea.’

Ernest Matson Fall was born in Oswestry, Shropshire, on 17 February 1883, and having emigrated to South Africa served during the Boer War as a Trooper in the South African Light Horse. Subsequently embarking on a career in the Mercantile Marine, he was commissioned Sub-Lieutenant in the Royal Naval Reserve on 1 January 1912, and was promoted Lieutenant on 8 July 1915, on which date he was posted to the battleship H.M.S. Bellerophon, seeing active service in her at the Battle of Jutland on 31 May 1916. On 28 July 1917 he was appointed to H.M.S. Gentian for navigational duties, and on 22 January 1918 was appointed Captain of the Hunt-Class Minesweeper H.M.S. Irvine; for subsequent services in minesweeping operations he was awarded the Distinguished Service Cross.

Promoted Lieutenant-Commander on 2 August 1923, and Commander on 31 December 1926, Fall was awarded the Royal Naval Reserve Decoration, and was placed on the Retired List with the rank of Captain on 20 February 1933. He was awarded the Liverpool Shipwreck and Humane Society’s Silver Medal ‘for having gallantly rescued, with the assistance of another, a man who was in grave danger of drowning, in the River Mersey, off George’s Landing Stage, on 15 November 1938.’

A Master mariner with the Cunard shipping line, Fall served during the Second World War in command of requisitioned liners R.M.S. Queen Elizabeth and R.M.S. Queen Mary, that were used as H.M. Transport Ships, conveying under hazardous conditions over half a million American troops to and from various theatres of War. On one voyage in 1943, Queen Mary carried over 16,600 people, still the record for the most people on a vessel. For his services Fall was created a Commander of the Order of the British Empire, and was awarded the Legion of Merit by the United States of America. He was removed from the Retired List on 29 November 1954, and died in South Africa on 21 September 1955.

Sold with the original Bestowal Document for the CBE; the original Bestowal Document for the United States Legion of Merit, together with the accompanying citation; the original Bestowal Document for the Liverpool Shipwreck and Humane Society award, this somewhat damaged’ and various lapel badges, including a Second World War King’s Badge ‘For Loyal Service’ Badge; a South African War Veterans Association lapel badge; a British Empire Service League Nyasaland lapel badge; and a South African Navy League lapel badge.
Dr David Biggins
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