Welcome, Guest
Username: Password: Remember me

TOPIC:

Medals to the Royal Dublin Fusiliers 6 months 3 weeks ago #84175

  • djb
  • djb's Avatar Topic Author
  • Offline
  • Administrator
  • Administrator
  • Posts: 29333
  • Thank you received: 3476
Last seen 8 months ago.


Picture courtesy of Morton and Eden

Afghan (1) Kandahar (Maj. G.W. Willock. 3. Bl. C.);
QSA (3) Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Transvaal (Lieut. G.W. Willock. Rl. Dub. Fus.);
KSA (2) (Lieut: G.W. Willock. R. Innis: Fus:)

Major George Woodward Willock is recorded in Shadbolts The Afghan Campaigns of 1878-80 as having served as follows: Major G. W. Willock served with the regiment throughout the campaign, taking part in the action at Shekabad, the march from Kabul to the relief of Kandahar, the reconnaissance of 31 Aug 1880 and the battle of Kandahar…. twice Mentioned in Despatches… (and was) wounded at battle of Kandahar. Willock, serving in the 3rd Bengal Cavalry, was one of only two casualties from his regiment at Kandahar, one officer (Willock) and one OR, a sowar (mortally).

In The Second Anglo-Afghan War 1878-1880 Casualty Roll by Anthony Farrington, Major George Woodward Willock is noted as having been slightly wounded on 31 Aug 1880, Kandahar (pg.97).

The Army List Jan-March 1885 shows; Major Willock 20.10.79 Cavalry- Bengal (India Local Forces).
Dr David Biggins
Attachments:

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Medals to the Royal Dublin Fusiliers 5 months 4 weeks ago #84742

  • djb
  • djb's Avatar Topic Author
  • Offline
  • Administrator
  • Administrator
  • Posts: 29333
  • Thank you received: 3476

Picture courtesy of Warwick and Warwick

QSA (3) Cape Colony, Tugela Heights, OFS (4571 Pte P. Murphy Rl Dub Fus.)

Also entitled to Tr and RoL (WO100/209p135).

Invalided September 1900 and discharged 20 June 1901.
Dr David Biggins
Attachments:

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Medals to the Royal Dublin Fusiliers 1 week 1 day ago #88227

  • djb
  • djb's Avatar Topic Author
  • Offline
  • Administrator
  • Administrator
  • Posts: 29333
  • Thank you received: 3476

Picture courtesy of Noonan's

QSA (1) Relief of Ladysmith (6002 Cpl. J. Wisdom, Rl. Dublin Fus:)

J. Wisdom attested for the Royal Dublin Fusiliers and served with the 2nd Battalion in South Africa during the Boer War. He was killed in action at Colenso on 15 December 1899.

Surprisingly, Noonan's set the estimate at £240-£280.
Dr David Biggins
Attachments:

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Medals to the Royal Dublin Fusiliers 6 days 15 hours ago #88251

  • djb
  • djb's Avatar Topic Author
  • Offline
  • Administrator
  • Administrator
  • Posts: 29333
  • Thank you received: 3476

Picture courtesy of Noonan's

QSA (3) Cape Colony, Orange Free State, South Africa 1902 (2/Lieut: C. C. A. Cooper. R. Dub: Fus:)

DNW June 1998.

Cecil Charles Arthur Cooper, the son of Major-General C. D. Cooper, was commissioned Second Lieutenant in the Royal Dublin Fusiliers on 28 January 1903.
Dr David Biggins
Attachments:

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Medals to the Royal Dublin Fusiliers 2 days 15 hours ago #88321

  • djb
  • djb's Avatar Topic Author
  • Offline
  • Administrator
  • Administrator
  • Posts: 29333
  • Thank you received: 3476

Picture courtesy of Noonan's

CB Companion’s breast badge, silver-gilt and enamel, converted for neck wear, with short section of neck riband for display purposes;
QSA (5) Cape Colony, Tugela Heights, Relief of Ladysmith, Transvaal, Laing’s Nek (Maj. Genl. C. D. Cooper, CB, R. Dub. Fus.) officially engraved naming;
King’s South Africa, (2) South Africa 1901, South Africa 1902 (Col. C. D. Cooper. CB, Staff) officially engraved naming;
Coronation 1902, silver, unnamed as issued;
Coronation 1911, unnamed as issued.

Together with the recipient’s Royal Dublin Fusiliers Regimental Medal, gold, inscribed on the edge (Maj. Gen. C. D. Cooper. CB), the suspension dated ‘1662-1911’, with gold riband bar inscribed ‘Colonel 13th March 1910’, and gold top suspension brooch inscribed ‘Old Toughs’.

CB LG 19 April 1901.

Charles Duncan Cooper was born on 25 June 1849, the son of Brigadier-General G. L. Cooper, Royal Artillery, who was killed during the Relief of Lucknow. He was educated at Christ College, Finchley, and began his military career at 19 years of age as an Ensign in the 2nd Battalion, 103rd Regiment of Foot (Royal Bombay Fusiliers). He remained with that regiment, which became the 2nd Battalion, Royal Dublin Fusiliers in 1881, throughout his career. Cooper served as Adjutant to the 4th Battalion (Dublin City Militia) from 1885 to 1889. When the Boer War broke out in 1899, he was ordered to South Africa in command of the 2nd Battalion. After arriving there, and upon the wounding of the regimental commander, Cooper was breveted a full Colonel and took overall command.

The Dublin Fusiliers formed part of General Sir Redvers Buller’s Western Field Force, comprising some 30,000 men, which was pushing its way to Natal to relieve the besieged garrison in the town of Ladysmith. During the advance he took part in the action at Lombard’s Kop, the battle of Colenso, Spion Kop, Vaal Krantz, Tugela Heights, and Pieter’s Hill. At Colenso the Dublins, led by Cooper, suffered very badly. General Hart, Commanding Officer of the Irish Brigade, of which the Dublins were a part, was of the old school and thought that correct assault tactics meant a repeat of parade ground drill in the face of the enemy. Cooper, however, had witnessed the effect of Boer Mauser fire in previous attacks and knew that to march shoulder to shoulder into battle was tantamount to suicide; especially so inasmuch as at Colenso the Dublins were to advance along a very narrow front against an entrenched enemy. Cooper spread his men out at intervals and ordered them forward. General Hart saw this movement and beckoned Cooper to his side. “Sir, you will close ranks to the proper order!” “General”, Cooper replied, “I fear the consequences, but do it I will!” The Dublins suffered a great many casualties in the attack, and they found themselves trapped in the open throughout the entire day before they could safely extricate themselves. Shortly after the battle of Pieter’s Hill, advance mounted units of Buller’s army made their way into Ladysmith. The siege was over and the Dublin Fusiliers were specially selected to march into Ladysmith at the head of the relieving force, and Colonel Cooper, on horseback, was the first man to enter the town. Cooper was promoted to the rank of local Major-General in March 1900, and given command of the 4th Infantry Brigade which he took through the operations in Natal, including the battle of Laing’s Nek. In July of that year he was appointed General Officer Commanding the Heidelberg sub-district. He was mentioned in Buller’s despatch of 30 March, 1900, ‘a thoroughly good officer who led his regiment thoroughly well’, and again on 9 November, ‘was appointed to command on General Lyttleton’s promotion. An excellent regimental C.O., has proved himself equally valuable in command of a brigade, and shown himself to be a resolute, capable commander.’

He was subsequently appointed a Companion of the Bath in recognition of his services during the Boer War. With the end of hostilities, Cooper was sent home to command 102nd regimental district, Naas, in 1903. In 1905 he was promoted Brigadier-General in command of the North Irish Regimental grouped districts, and retired from the army in 1906 as a Major-General. He was made Colonel of the Royal Dublin Fusiliers on 13 March 1910, a position he held until his death on 31 July 1922.

Dr David Biggins
Attachments:

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Moderators: djb
Time to create page: 1.180 seconds
Powered by Kunena Forum