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Medals to HMS Doris 2 months 1 day ago #95501

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QSA (1) Belmont (8034 Pte. J. Boyle, R:M:L:I: H.M.S. Doris)

Private John Boyle was killed in action at Graspan (Enslin) on 25 November 1899. Four officers and 12 men of the Royal Naval Brigade were killed at Graspan, and one man died of wounds.

At 7am on 25 November 1899, at Graspan, the infantry began to work forward under the cover of artillery fire. The Naval Brigade led the storming force, extended in a single line, each man six paces apart from his neighbour. As they began the ascent, advancing by brief rushes in very open order, the hill suddenly appeared to swarm with enemies; from the crest, from behind every boulder poured a murderous fire. The naval officers of the Brigade still carried swords and could be readily distinguished; they were the target of every Boer rifle. Major Plumbe of the Marines, who was gallantly leading in front of his men, closely followed into the storm of battle by his little terrier, staggered, shouting to his soldiers, not to mind him, but to advance. He never rose again. Colonel Verner, who survived the action, afterwards stated that ‘no better kept line ever went forward to death or glory’. However, so terrible was the fire and so annihilating it’s effects upon the Brigade, that the order had to be given to retire upon the last cover.

For a moment it seemed as though the attack had failed. But the artillery poured its fire upon the crest of the ridge with more vehemence than ever; and up the slopes in very open order, firing and cheering, came the Yorkshire Light Infantry to the support of the hard pressed Naval Brigade, while the Loyal North Lancashire’s and Northumberland’s too, were sweeping forward upon the line of heights held by the Boers. Once more the Seamen and Marines pressed upward at an order from the wounded Captain Prothero ‘Men of the Naval Brigade, advance at the double; take that Kopje and be hanged to it.’ The men responded magnificently. For the last few yards of the advance the Boers could no longer fire with safety at their assailants. Their very position became disadvantageous as the slopes were so steep that they had to stand up to see their assailants, and in the deluge of shrapnel and rifle bullets which beat upon the summit, this meant almost certain death. Lieutenant Taylor of the Navy and Lieutenant Jones of the Marines, the last in spite of a bullet in his thigh, were the first into the Boer entrenchments at the top. They were closely followed by their men, and the Kopje was won.

‘I shall never forget the faces of some of those who had fallen in the final rush,’ said Colonel Verner, of the dead of the Naval Brigade. ‘They lay about in every attitude, many with their rifles, with bayonets fixed, tightly clutched in their hands, and in some cases still held at the charge. These were the same hard featured, clean cut faces, which but a short time before I had watched laboriously skirmishing across the veldt, now pale in death, but with the same set expression of being in terrible earnest to see the business through.’

Sold for a hammer price of GBP 2,000. Totals: GBP 2,576. R 56,950. AUD 4,700. NZD 5,140. CAD 4,290. USD 3,150. EUR 2,900.
Dr David Biggins
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Medals to HMS Doris 1 month 2 weeks ago #95698

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The QSA (1), KSA (2), LS&GC trio to Chief Writer R H Edge is here: www.angloboerwar.com/forum/11-research/2...e-navy?start=6#95697
Dr David Biggins

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Medals to HMS Doris 2 weeks 6 days ago #96054

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CB (Military) s/g;
MVO 4th Class, ‘147’;
QSA (1) Belmont (Capt. R. C. Prothero, R.N, H.M.S. Doris) impressed naming

Alan Hall Collection, June 2000.

CB (Military) London Gazette 6 November 1900: ‘For services in South Africa.’ One of 8 such awards to the Royal Navy for South Africa.
MVO London Gazette 2 June 1903: ‘Commanded HMS Implacable; H.M’s visit to Malta.

Reginald Prothero was born on 15 June 1849. At the age of 13 years 6 months he entered the Royal Navy on 9 December 1862, as a Cadet aboard the Training Ship Britannia. On passing out in June 1864 he was awarded a 3rd Class Certificate and on joining his first ship H.M.S. Victory he was promoted to Midshipman on 1 September 1864. During his time aboard Victory he served for short periods of training in the following ships: Geyser, Warrior, Meednee, Orlando and Liffey. In May 1866 he was appointed to Victoria where he served for 18 months until posted to Excellent in October 1867. On promotion to Acting Sub Lieutenant on 23 April 1870, he joined the Royal Naval College at Portsmouth. On passing out of Excellent he obtained three 2nd Class Certificates and was confirmed in the rank of Sub Lieutenant on 22 July 1870.

His next seagoing appointments were to Research, April 1871; Royal Adelaide, September 1872; Impregnable, January 1873; and Fantome, November 1873. He was promoted to Lieutenant on 8 August 1874, and in July 1875 he was granted 9 months foreign leave to accept employment with the Mexican Government. On his return to England he was appointed to the following ships: Magpie, July 1876; Nassau, November 1878; Magpie, November 1878; Tyne, March 1881; Duke of Wellington, June 1881; and Vernon, October 1881. In the latter ship he underwent a Torpedo Course and obtained a 3rd Class Certificate. He next joined Excellent, November 1881 for a Gunnery Course where he was awarded a 2nd Class Certificate.

His next appointment was to Assistance, March 1882; he later transferred to Himalaya in December 1882 and remained in this vessel until January 1886. He next joined Spey, July 1886, followed by Canada in September 1886 and Devastation in January 1889. Whilst in the latter ship he was promoted to Commander on 30 June 1889. In his new rank he was appointed to Edinburgh in January 1890; Nile, June 1891;and Achilles in October 1894. Promoted to Captain in January 1895. He was given command of Trafalgar in April 1896, followed by Revenge in December 1896 and Doris in April 1898, as Flag Captain to Rear Admiral Sir Robert Harris, Commander in Chief on the Cape of Good Hope and West Coast of Africa Station.

Following the outbreak of War in South Africa Captain Prothero was landed in November 1899 in command of a Naval Brigade drawn from HM Ships Doris, Monarch, and Powerful. The Brigade joined Lieutenant-General Lord Methuen on 22 November and on the 24th Captain Prothero was informed that he and his men were to have the honour of leading the attack at the battle of Graspan. Following an artillery bombardment of the Boer positions the seamen and marines deployed into a single line on the right of the attack with intervals of four paces between the men. They advanced on the enemy's position led in the centre by Captain Prothero, on the left by Major Plumbe RMLI, and on the right by Commander Ethelston; the two last named officers were killed during the action.

The enemy opened a withering frontal fire at about 600 yards which was later supplemented by an equally heavy cross fire. Notwithstanding, the Naval Brigade continued to steadily advance by rushes. Well over six feet tall Captain Prothero had a charmed life; men were being knocked down all around him as he led his men forwards. With the top of the kopje in sight he was struck down and was unwillingly carried to the rear. The Naval Brigade had been decimated and command devolved to Captain A. E. Marchant, RMLI. Captain Prothero in his Despatch relates how the fire was so hot that several times he saw a man hit three times before he reached the ground. There was not a moment of hesitation in the Naval Brigade as they continued to advance to the summit of the kopje, driving the Boers before them until they were in full retreat.

In his report to Rear Admiral Harris, Captain Marchant stated that ‘Captain Prothero both before and after he was wounded behaved with great gallantry and coolness and from the ground where he had been struck down continued to urge his men forward until he was reluctantly removed to the rear.’ For this action Captain Prothero was Mentioned in Despatches and awarded the CB (Military).

Following recovery from his wounds aboard Doris, Captain Prothero was again landed to command the Dockyard Defence Corps at Simonstown and acted as Commandant of the town in February 1901 when the Boers were threatening Cape Colony. In November 1902 he was given Command of H.M.S. Implacable and remained in this vessel until promoted to Flag Rank in February 1906. In 1903 he was awarded the MVO, for services during the visit of King Edward VII to Malta. Shortly after this appointment he was placed on the Retired List (age) having served for nearly thirty years. In July 1910 he was promoted to Vice-Admiral on the Retired List. He died on 26 May 1927 aged 78 years.

In the book 'Fabulous Admirals' by Commander Geoffrey Lewis, AFC, RN, fourteen pages are given to career of Rear-Admiral Prothero when he was serving as a Commander and Captain in the Mediterranean Fleet and provides both an informative and humorous insight into the man who became a larger than life legend in naval circles.
Dr David Biggins
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Medals to HMS Doris 2 weeks 5 days ago #96071

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Picture courtesy of Noonan's

CB (Civil) n/b s/g'
Albert Medal, 2nd Class, for Gallantry in Saving Life at Sea, bronze and enamel, the reverse inscribed (Awarded by His Majesty to Lieutenant Halton Stirling Lecky, R.N., in recognition of his gallantry in rescuing two soldiers from drowning at Kosi Bay on the 25th of August 1900) the reverse of the crown with maker's cartouche 'Phillips, Cockspur St.', together with its original Phillips Bros. & Son presentation case, the lid embossed in gilt letters 'Presented in the name of His Majesty to Lieutenant Halton Stirling Lecky, R.N., for Gallantry in Saving Life at Sea';
QSA (1) Natal (Sub-Lieut: H. S. Lecky, R.N. H.M.S. Doris);
1914-15 Star (Commr. H. S. Lecky, R.N.);
British War and Victory Medals, with MID (Capt. H. S. Lecky. R.N.);
Greece, Kingdom, Order of the Redeemer, 5th Class breast badge, silver, gold and enamels;
France, Third Republic, Legion of Honour, 5th Class breast badge, silver, gold and enamels

Royal Humane Society, small silver medal (Successful), (Sub Lieut: H. S. Lecky. R.N. Aug: 25 1900) in its Elkington case of issue;

Lloyds medal for Saving Life at Sea, silver (Lieut. H. S. Lecky. R.N. - 25th August 1900.) in its original presentation case, the lid embossed in gilt letters with relevant details;

Granton Naval Base, silver medal for Zeal (Comdr. H. S. Lecky. R.N. 2.9.16, C.E. Granton Naval Base)

Only 7 Albert Medals awarded to Royal Navy officers prior to the Great War.

Halton Stirling Lecky was Sub-Lieutenant of Thrush and Widgeon during the Boer War, and served on both vessels on the Delagoa Bay Blockade. He was awarded the Albert Medal (2nd class) on 28 June 1901; the silver medal of the Royal Humane Society on 15 July 1901; and Lloyds Silver Medal on 10 August 1901, all awarded for his bravery as described in the following extract from the London Gazette:

‘On August 25th, 1900, H.M.S. Widgeon was anchored in Kosi Bay, fifty miles south of Delagoa Bay, in order to land stores and troops. The work of disembarkation was carried out by four boats manned by Malays under the superintendence of Sub Lieutenant Lecky, who had been sent onshore for the purpose.

Heavy breakers in lines of three to five, according to the tide rolling in about fifty yards apart, made the work very risky.

One boat loaded with stores and with Second Lieutenant Arnold Gray, Thorneycroft's Mounted Infantry, Trooper Frederick Trethowen, Steinacker's Horse, and Private J. H. Forbes, Thorneycroft's Mounted Infantry, on board, capsized about three hundred yards from the shore. The five Malays forming the boat's crew, and Private Forbes by dint of hard swimming, with the assistance of the boat's oars, managed to reach the land after severe buffeting from the heavy seas. Lieutenant Gray was unable to swim, but with Trooper Trethowen, clung to the boat, which drifted slowly keel upwards in a northerly direction almost parallel with the shore, carried by the set of a strong current. Huge breakers continually swept over the boat, and the men had great difficulty in retaining their hold. Sharks were observed near the boat before and after the accident. The boat was now about one hundred and fifty yards from the shore. Sub Lieutenant Lecky, seeing the critical position the two men were in, tore off his clothes and, plunging into the surf, endeavoured to swim to their assistance. He was twice thrown back on the beach by the heavy seas, but afterwards succeeded in bringing first Lieutenant Gray and then the other safe to shore. The rescued men were quite unconscious, having been nearly thirty minutes in the water. Sub Lieutenant Lecky and his servant, Private Borting, R.M.L.I. then applied the usual methods for restoring animation, and both men eventually recovered consciousness - Lieutenant Gray after a lapse of two and a half hours.’

Lecky was subsequently Sub Lieutenant of Doris (medal and clasp); was in command of torpedo-boat No. 29 on the occasion of the burial at sea, by her own request, of Miss Mary Kingsley. He was responsible for the organisation of the Shetland Islands for war, 1913-14; Minesweeping on the East Coast, 1914. Lecky created the Auxiliary Patrol Service of 3000 vessels and necessary personnel against enemy submarines, 1914-16 (awarded C.B.); Naval Assistant to the Fourth Sea Lord, 1915-16; commanded the light cruisers Southampton and Birmingham in the North Sea, 1916-17; Assistant to Naval Secretary to First Lord of the Admiralty, 1917-18; engaged on miscellaneous service in the Aegean blockade of the Dardanelles, occupation of Constantinople etc., 1918; mentioned in despatches and awarded the Order of the Redeemer (Greece) and Legion of Honour (France) for duties in connection with the war operations of these navies in the Aegean. In 1919 he organised the Mine Clearance Service and received the high appreciation of the Board of Admiralty; Commanded the R.N. Detention Barracks at Chatham, 1920-24, and was placed on the retired list with the rank of Captain in 1925. Captain Lecky died on 2 June 1940, aged 71 years.

Lecky was author of the well known work 'The Kings Ships' , 3 volumes 1913 and 1914, the final 3 volumes of which were suspended and never published owing to the outbreak of the War.

Dr David Biggins
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Medals to HMS Doris 1 week 2 days ago #96185

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QSA (2) Belmont, Modder River (4116 Pte. J. Collicott, R.M.L.I., H.M.S. Doris) impressed naming

James Collicott was born in Chelsea on 8 November 1869. A Labourer by occupation, he enlisted into the Royal Marines at London on 8 July 1887 and served in HMS Doris from November 1897 to May 1901. Serving with the Royal Naval Brigade in South Africa during the Boer War from 20 October 1899 to 4 September 1900, he was present at the battles of Belmont, Modder River and Enslin - being wounded in the latter action on 25 November 1899. Collicott was discharged from the Royal Marines in April 1905 and joined the Royal Fleet Reserve. He was mobilised for service in the Great War but was invalided out of the service on 24 May 1916.
Dr David Biggins
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Medals to HMS Doris 1 week 2 days ago #96187

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QSA (4) Cape Colony, Driefontein, Diamond Hill, Belfast (10362 Pte. E. H. Harding, R.M., H.M.S. Doris);
[ Great War trio ]

Ernest Harding was born in Penzance, Cornwall, on 25 May 1871 and enlisted in the Royal Marines at Plymouth on 25 June 1889. He served in HMS Doris from 9 December 1899 to 31 May 1901, landing with the Naval Brigade in South Africa on 28 February 1900, and was discharged on 1 July 1901. He enrolled in the Royal Fleet Reserve on 30 August 1902, and saw further service during the Great War in HMS Ocean from the outbreak of hostilities, and was serving in her when she hit a mine and sank in the Dardanelles on 18 March 1915 (with no loss of life). He was invalided out of the service on 29 March 1916.

Noonan's say sold with copied record of service, which states that a duplicate QSA was issued on 25 April 1916, the original having been ‘lost in HMS Ocean’. However, the medal in this lot is impressed in the style in use at the time of the Boer War, and so it would appear that this is the original.
Dr David Biggins
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