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Medals to the Imperial Yeomanry 3 months 2 weeks ago #92737

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Picture courtesy of Noonanan's

QSA (4) Cape Colony, Transvaal, Wittebergen, South Africa 1901, unofficial rivets between third and fourth clasps (4574 Trpr: V. Andrews, 41st. Coy. 12th Imp: Yeo:)

Victor Andrews was born in Fareham, Hampshire, and attested for the Imperial Yeomanry at Winchester on 5 January 1900, having previously served as a Cyclist in the 3rd Volunteer Battalion, Hampshire Regiment. He served with the 41st (Hampshire) Company, 12th Battalion Imperial Yeomanry in South Africa during the Boer War from 31 January 1900 to 25 April 1901, and was wounded by gun shot to the left leg at Lang Berg on 26 October 1900. He was discharged on 28 May 1901, his Medical History sheet recording that he was suffering at the time from enteric fever.
Dr David Biggins
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Medals to the Imperial Yeomanry 2 months 3 weeks ago #92981

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QSA (3) (33288 PTE C.E. LOCKYER. 34th COY IMP YEO.);
British War and Victory Medals (95 PTE C.E. LOCKYER 44 BN A.I.F.)

Charles Edward Lockyer was born about 1881 in Pimlico, London, England. He was working as an assistant when he enlisted into the Imperial Yeomanry on 26/2/1901, being assigned to the 34th (Middlesex) Company. He sailed for South Africa three weeks later with the 2nd Contingent (160 men), serving in South Africa from 25/3/1901 – 22/12/1901, before being returned to England. He was medically discharged as unfit on 12/2/1902. Of interest is a note on the medal roll ‘Transferred to base depot, discharged medically unfit, undesirable’.

In February 1914, he and his wife migrated to Perth, Western Australia to work as a baker. He enlisted into the 44th Battalion A.I.F. on 12/2/1916, being one of the ‘originals’ of ‘A’ Company with the service #95. He sailed for England with the battalion in June 1916 where they landed in France on 25/11/1916. He was wounded in action on 3/7/1917 at Messines when the battalion was providing working parties in the front line. He received multiple fragment wounds to both his legs from a shell burst and was subsequently evacuated to England and then to Australia for a medical discharge in April 1918.
Dr David Biggins
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Medals to the Imperial Yeomanry 4 weeks 1 day ago #93780

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Picture courtesy of Spink

CBE, 1st, Civil;
Knight of St John;
QSA (3) Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Transvaal (Lieut. W. E. Duncombe. 9/Co. 3/Imp. Yeo.);
1914 Star (Col: C. W. E. Duncombe. B.R.C.S. & O.St.J.J.);
British War and Victory Medals (Col. C. W. E. Duncombe.);
1911 Coronation;
1935 Jubilee;
1937 Coronation;
TD Ed VII, HM 1908

CBE London Gazette 7 January 1918: 'County Director, West Yorkshire, British Red Cross and Order of St John of Jerusalem.'

Knight of Grace London Gazette 27 November 1917.

Charles William Ernest Duncombe was born at Nawton, Yorkshire on 15 March 1862. The Duncombe family, along with their relatives, who including the Earl of Feversham, were very involved with the Yorkshire Hussars. Young Duncombe was commissioned into the unit and volunteered for service in South Africa with the 9th Company, Imperial Yeomanry on 27 January 1900. He was promoted to Captain, but was later invalided home on 1 March 1901.

Duncombe remained with the unit and was Lieutenant-Colonel (Commanding) in 1908, before being made Honorary Colonel of the Regiment from 1908-12 when the Yorkshire Hussars were part of the Yorkshire Mounted Brigade. He was also a Justice of the Peace in the North Riding of Yorkshire.

Upon the outbreak of the Great War, he served in France with the British Red Cross Society and Order of St. John of Jerusalem Searcher's Unit in France from 9 October 1914. He latterly went out to Egypt with the Enquiries Unit. He duly added the C.B.E. and was made a Knight of Grace of the Order of St John for his troubles. His Medals were issued to him at 83 Pall Mall (1914 Star - January 1918) and 27 Norfolk Crescent (Campaign Pair - March 1922). A prominent member of Yorkshire society, he lived at Rievaulx, Helmsley, edited Ryedale and was a member of the Cavalry Club and the Yorkshire Club.

He died on 8 May 1945.
Dr David Biggins
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