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Medals to the Imperial Yeomanry 6 months 3 weeks ago #83177

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Picture courtesy of Lockdales

QSA (4) Cape Colony, Rhodesia, Transvaal, Orange Free State, SA01 (15418 Corpl W H Child 75th Coy Imp Yeo) rank and name engraved, rest impressed;
BWM (650 Sgt W H Child Rif Brig)

Lockdales say he served with the 24th Bn India 1916-18. Medals and bars confirmed to roll. These his sole medal entitlement.
Dr David Biggins
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Medals to the Imperial Yeomanry 5 months 1 week ago #83842

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Picture courtesy of Noonan's

The Queen’s South Africa Medal awarded to Shoeing-Smith J. Hurst, Oxfordshire Yeomanry, who was killed in action on 26 February 1902, at Elandslaagte Farm, near Klerksdorp

QSA (4) Cape Colony, Transvaal, South Africa 1901, South Africa 1902 (35823 Shg:-Sth: J. Hurst. 40th Coy. Imp: Yeo:) last two clasps loose on ribbon as issued

John Hurst, 40th (Oxfordshire) Company, 10th Battalion, Imperial Yeomanry, was killed in action at Elandslaagte farm, near Klerksdorp, on 26 February 1902. He is buried in the Military Cemetery at Klerksdorp together with 46 other members of the Imperial Yeomanry (mostly from the action at Elandslaagte).

On 24 February 1902, a convoy heading for Klerksdorp bivouacked on the farm, Elandslaagte, between the Yster and Jagd Spruits, 25km south-west of Klerksdorp. The convoy was escorted by 230 Imperial Yeomanry of the 5th Battalion (13th, 14th, 15th, 16th, 100th, 101st, 102nd Coys), 9th Battalion (88th Coy) and 10th Battalion (40th Coy), as well as regular soldiers, mounted infantry and artillery. In all, there were 770 troops.

Early the following morning, the march resumed, with both the advance guard and the rear guard, including Yeomanry and infantry, covering the movement. After the convoy had proceeded 3km, 250 Boers under General Liebenberg attacked its front, while General J. Kemp, with 250 men, attacked its left flank. This assault was beaten off with artillery and rifle fire. A second attack was met with the same result. A third assault, by General J. G. Celliers with 100 men, came from the rear, the Boers charging through the defensive ring of infantry. Some of Celliers' men then attacked on the right flank, while Kemp renewed his attack. This broke the outer defensive ring and, shortly afterwards, resistance collapsed on every side. The wagons were stampeded towards the Jagd Spruit, where they became stuck in the muddy waters of the stream and were captured. Some mounted infantry escaped to Klerksdorp, where the alarm was raised and reinforcements gathered. They hurried to the scene, but, on arrival, confronted by Kemp and his men, they could only report back that the disaster had been complete.

British losses were 73 men killed or mortally wounded, 110 wounded, 270 taken prisoner. Thirty-two men of the Imperial Yeomanry lost their lives. Of greater importance for the Boers was the capture of 156 wagons, 1500 mules, four artillery pieces, 2000 rifles and half-a-million rounds of ammunition. The Boer casualties were twelve dead and 42 wounded.

The 40th Company casualties on 26 February amounted to Lieutenant T. Willis and Shoeing-Smith J. Hurst killed, Sergeant F. G. Goldsworthy, died of wounds, one man wounded and three taken prisoner. Lieutenant Willis was the last Yeomanry officer to be killed during the Boer War.
Dr David Biggins
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Medals to the Imperial Yeomanry 5 months 1 week ago #83876

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Picture courtesy of Noonan's

QSA (4) Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Transvaal, South Africa 1901 (Capt: E. C. H. Grant. Imp: Yeo:) in named card box of issue.

Together with the following shooting awards and badges:

i. Charterhouse Cadet embroidered marksman badges for 1883 - 1884
ii. Army Regimental Rifle Matches 1889, silver, hallmarked Birmingham 1889, reverse engraved ‘Infantry Abroad 2nd Lieut. E. Grant, 1st A. & S. Highlanders 89 Points’ with additional silver ribbon bar inscribed ‘1890 - 89 points’, in B. Ninnes fitted case
iii. Scottish Rifle Association 1897, embroidered arm badge
iv. The Army Eight 1887, Officers Match, Regulars v. Auxiliaries, silver, hallmarked Birmingham 1896, reverse engraved ‘Captain E. C. H. Grant, A. & S. Highrs.’ the ribbon fitted with silver buckle and dated bars for 1897, 1898, 1899 and 1900, in B. Ninnes fitted case
v. A.R.M. Gregory Jewel 1897, 15 carat gold and enamels, reverse engraved ‘Won by Capt. Grant. A. & S.H. Aggregate 600’ in fitted case
vi. Army Eight, silver-gilt medal for 1898, hallmarked Birmingham 1897, reverse engraved ‘Captain E. C. H. Grant A. & S. Highs.’ with ribbon buckle and dated bar for 1899, in B. Ninnes fitted case
vii. School of Musketry, Ninnes Challenge Cup 1898, 15 carat gold and enamel, hallmarked Birmingham 1897, reverse engraved ‘Won by Capt. E. C. H. Grant’ in Ninnes Goldsmith Hythe fitted case
viii. The Methuen Cup 1899, silver, hallmarked Birmingham 1899, reverse engraved ‘Won by The Hythe Staff. Av. 96.37. Capt. E. Grant’ in Ninnes Goldsmith Hythe fitted case, extremely fine (9) £400-£500

Edward Chetwood Hamilton Grant, Captain 1st Batalion, Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, died of enteric fever at Kimberley on 25 August 1901.

He was born in May 1868, educated at Charterhouse, and entered the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders January 1888; was promoted Lieutenant in January 1890, and Captain in July 1897. Having served as adjutant of his Regiment, June 1894 to December 1897, he was then appointed an Instructor on the Staff of the School of Musketry at Hythe, which post he held till October 1899. He was District Inspector of Musketry at Aldershot, November 1899. At the time of his death he was serving as adjutant of the 24th Battalion Imperial Yeomanry to which he was appointed in April 1901, having been allowed to give up his staff appointment at Aldershot to enable him to go to South Africa.

His name is inscribed on the tablet in the War Memorial Cloister erected at Charterhouse.
Dr David Biggins
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Medals to the Imperial Yeomanry 4 months 3 weeks ago #84217

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Pictures courtesy of Spink

[ CB ]
Afghan (1) Kabul (Capt. T. Deane, Bl. S.C. Staff Offr.);
IGS 1895 (2) Punjab Frontier 1897-98, Tirah 1897-98 (Coll: T. Deane C.B. I.S.C.), one rivet between clasps loose;
QSA (4) Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Transvaal, South Africa 1901 (Colonel T. Deane. C.B., Imp: Yeo:),

Perhaps the best biography is offered by the obituary which featured in The Homeward Mail, published on 3 June 1907:

'Colonel Thomas Deane, C.B., late of the Indian Army, whose death from heart failure has occurred at Newlands, Surbiton, was born in 1841 and received a commission in the Madras Cavalry in March 1862. From 1863-69 he was attached to the 21st Hussars, being appointed a Lieutenant in the Bengal Staff Corps in January 1869. Obtaining a Captaincy in 1874, he was appointed Assistant Secretary in the Military Department of the Government of India in January 1877, and served in the Afghan War of 1879-80 as Staff Officer for Transport and Supply, taking part in the attack on Sherpore and on Tahkt-i-Sah heights, the action on the Asmai Heights, and the Defence of Sherpore. He was specially mentioned in despatches and received the Medal with clasp. His employment in the Military Secretariat Department of the Government continued till November 1889, he receiving the acknowledgements of the Indian Government for his zeal and ability while so employed.

He was afterwards, from that date till May 1898, Director of the Army Remount Department in India, during which he took part in the operations on the North-West Frontier of India and the Tirah expedition of 1897-98 for which he had the Medal and two clasps. He reached the rank of Colonel in 1892, was nominated a CB on the celebration of Queen Victoria's Diamond Jubilee, and in 1898 was placed on the Unemployed Supernumerary List.

During the War in South Africa Colonel Deane served as a Special Service Officer for the Imperial Yeomanry, Commanding the Depot at Elandsfontein, and taking part in the operations in the Transvaal, in Orange River Colony and in the Cape Colony. He was mentioned in despatches and received the Queen's Medal with four clasps. Subsequently appointed agent in England for the Government of India Studs.'

Deane was born at Dublin on 12 May 1841 and spent his spare time hunting, shooting or fishing and was a member at the Garrick. During the visit of the Prince of Wales to India in 1875-76, Deane served with Captain Peacock and was detached from the Viceroy's Bodyguard in order to protect the Prince. A Regimental Order was published on 4 January 1876 expressing the pleasure of the work of the party.

It is worth noting that Deane would have celebrated his 60th birthday whilst on campaign in South Africa.

Dr David Biggins
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Medals to the Imperial Yeomanry 4 months 1 week ago #84487

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The campaign medals to Colonel Deane sold this morning for a hammer price of £900. Totals (inc VAT on the commission for the UK only): £1,116. R22,100. Au$1,880. Can$1,660. US$1,300
Dr David Biggins

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Medals to the Imperial Yeomanry 4 months 1 week ago #84523

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MBE 2st, Mil,;
QSA (3) Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Transvaal (14105 Sgt. E. S. Woodiwiss, 47th Coy. 13th Impl: Yeo:);
KSA (1) SA02 (Capt. E. S. Woodiwiss, I.Y.);
1914 -15 Star (Capt: E. S. Woodiwiss Can: A.M.C.);
British War and Victory Medals (Hon. Major E. S. Woodiwiss.);
Colonial Auxiliary Forces Officers’ Decoration, GV, reverse inscribed, ‘Major E. S. Woodiwiss, A.M.C. 1917’, hallmarks for Birmingham 1913, complete with top suspension bar

Lovell Collection, Sotheby’s, November 1978.

MBE London Gazette 3 June 1919.

CAF Decoration GO 76 of 15 September 1917.

Edwin Sydney Woodiwiss was born at Derby on 13 December 1871, the youngest of 10 children born to Sir Abraham and lady Emma Woodiwiss. He served in the ranks of the Imperial Yeomanry during the Boer War and was taken prisoner upon the surrender of the 13th Imperial Yeomanry following the disaster at Lindley in May 1900. Sent to Barberton as a special prisoner, he was released upon the surprise arrival of General French on 13 September 1900. He was commissioned 2nd Lieutenant in the Imperial Yeomanry in March 1901, was promoted to Lieutenant in May 1901 and to Captain in November 1901.

After a move to western Manitoba in 1903, Captain Woodiwiss signed Attestation papers to join the Canadian Overseas Expeditionary Force on 25 September 1914, serving with the Canadian Army Medical Corps. He finished the war in the rank of Major and was awarded the MBE in 1919.

Woodiwiss left an impressive legacy in the cat fancy with his commitment to the Siamese breed, both before and after the First World War; later in the 1930s, he was to play an important part in establishing a solid basis for the breeding of the Abyssinian breed which was to see unforeseen devastation during the coming war. Prior to the Boer War, he was recognised as a breeder of prize-winning Dachshund and Schipperke dogs, and was also a well-known breeder of the diminutive Dexter breed of cattle, winning many major awards. This small herd of just twenty cattle was put up for sale two months after he departed for South Africa to service during the second Boer War.

Major Woodiwiss died in North London on 13 December 1940, and is buried in St Laurence’s Churchyard at Upminster, in the same grave as an infant daughter from his first marriage.
Dr David Biggins
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