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Medals to the East Lancashire Regiment 1 year 8 months ago #83683

  • gavmedals
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Thank you Dave, an interesting read
Regards

Gavin
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Medals to the East Lancashire Regiment 1 year 7 months ago #84182

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From the next Morton and Eden sale.

QSA (3) Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Johannesburg (3244 Pte W. Jackson, E. Lanc: Regt);
KSA (2) (3244 Pte W. Jackson. E. Lanc: Regt);
Army LS&GC Ed VII (3244 Pte W. Jackson. E. Lanc Regt).

William Jackson was born in 1873 at St Mary’s, Cavan, Ireland. He enlisted for service with the East Lancashire Regiment at Burnley on 2 July 1891, having previously worked as a Farm Labourer, and saw service at home and in Gibraltar prior to the outbreak of the Boer War. Receiving the Queen’s South Africa and King’s South Africa Medals for this service (confirmed as above), he returned to England in late 1902, remaining there until 1904 when they sailed for India – where they would remain for the next seven years. Jackson returned home in 1911 and was discharged from further service on 28 June 1912. He had completed a total of 21 years with the East Lancashire Regiment and received his LS&GC as a result.

Members of his family appear to have emigrated to Australia, and it is likely that he joined them there in later life.
Dr David Biggins

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Medals to the East Lancashire Regiment 1 year 6 days ago #88693

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Picture courtesy of Noonan's

QSA (3) Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Transvaal (Lieut: L. H. D.’O. Moule. E. Lanc: Regt);
KSA (2) (Lt. L. H. D’O. Moule. E. Lanc. Regt.);
AGS 1902 (2) S. Nigeria 1902-03, West Africa 1906 (Lieut: L. H. D. O. Moule. S.N. Regt.) last clasp loose on riband

Provenance: R. Magor Collection, DNW, July 2003 (when A.G.S. had ‘S. Nigeria 1902-03’ clasp only).

Louis Horsford D’Oyley Moule was born in Mizzapur, India in October 1876. He was the son of H. D. Moule, C.S.I., and educated at Exeter before enrolling as a cadet at Dartmouth Naval College in 1891. The navy was obviously not for Moule, and he commenced his military career in the Cape Mounted Rifles and was a veteran of the punitive expedition to Griqualand West in 1897. He was commissioned second lieutenant in the 1st Battalion, East Lancashire Regiment in May 1900, direct from his old regiment out in South Africa. Subsequently employed in the operations in Cape Colony with the Colonial Division, and in the Transvaal and Orange Free State with Lord Methuen’s Flying Column, and afterwards in a mobile column, he was advanced to lieutenant in March 1902.

Moule transferred in the same year to the Southern Nigeria Regiment, and quickly witnessed further active service in assorted operations against local tribesmen 1903-11, largely under the command of Lieutenant-Colonel W. C. G. Heneker, DSO, Connaught Rangers (additionally entitled to ‘South Nigeria 1903’ and ‘South Nigeria 1905-06’ clasps). He was appointed a captain in the 8th (Service) Battalion, East Lancashire Regiment in September 1914, but had to relinquish his commission due to ill health (entitled to Silver War Badge).

Moule married Katie O’Shea, the daughter of the Irish nationalist politician Charles Stewart Parnell, in 1907. They were both friends of Sir Roger Casement, whom Moule had met in South Africa during the Boer War. Casement, who was executed for treason at Pentonville Prison 3 August 1916, frequently mentions his friend “Bill” Moule in his famous Black and White Diaries.

In later life Moule resided at 30 Mornington Crescent, London, and he died at St. Pancras Hospital, London in June 1938. The latter part of his family life had been particularly sad after having to leave the Army due to heart disease - the family became impoverished, with his wife resorting to crime - varying from petty theft, and fencing to driving an unlicensed taxi.
Dr David Biggins
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Medals to the East Lancashire Regiment 5 months 1 week ago #92081

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Picture courtesy of Spink

QSA (5) Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Transvaal, South Africa 1901, South Africa 1902 (7374 Sergt: D. A. Cliff Vol. Coy E. Lanc: R);
Volunteer Force Long Service Medal Ed VII (1124 Sgt: D. A. Cliff 2/ V. B. E. Lanc: Regt)

David Albert Cliff was born in 1876 at Whalley, Lancashire and worked as a weaver whilst also serving with the 2nd Volunteer Battalion, East Lancashire Regiment. Embodied for service on 24 February 1900 he was posted to South Africa on 23 March 1901. Returning to Britain on 22 June 1902 Cliff was disembodied the same day.
Dr David Biggins
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Medals to the East Lancashire Regiment 4 months 3 weeks ago #92234

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The Boer War DCM group to RSM P J Lydon is here: www.angloboerwar.com/forum/5-medals-and-...-war?start=402#92233
Dr David Biggins

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Medals to the East Lancashire Regiment 2 weeks 3 days ago #94094

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DCM GV (6-7944 C.S. Mjr: W. Neill. 6/E. Lan: R.);
QSA (2) Cape Colony, Orange Free State (9281 Cpl. W. Neill, E. Lanc: Regt.);
KSA (2) (9281 Pte. W. Neill. E. Lanc: Regt.);
1914 Star, with clasp (7944 Pte. W. Neill. 2/E. Lan: R.);
British War and Victory Medals (7944 W.O. Cl. 2. W. Neill. E. Lan. R.);
Defence Medal, mounted on card for display, the Boer War medals with considerable edge bruising and contact marks, fine, the Q.S.A. with repaired and slack suspension

DCM London Gazette 1 May 1918: ‘For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. When in command of the company after all the officers had become casualties, he showed great initiative in reorganising the company when exposed to heavy fire. He remained in command of the company throughout the day and following night, and rendered exceptionally valuable service, displaying marked efficiency and energy on all occasions.’
Annotated gazette states: ‘Mesopotamia, 30 April 1917.’

William Neill was born at Burnley, Lancashire, on 1 September 1882, and originally enlisted into the 3rd East Lancashire Regiment on 24 January 1900, and served with the battalion in South Africa. He transferred to the Army Service Corps on 7 May 1902, but re-enlisted into the East Lancashire Regiment at Burnley on 21 September 1903. He served with the 1st Battalion at Home until May 1904, when he transferred to the 2nd Battalion and served with it in India until December 1911 when the Battalion moved to South Africa. Neill married whilst in South Africa and lived at Kent Road, Wynberg. He was still serving at Wynberg at the outbreak of the War when the Battalion was recalled, landing at Southampton on 30 October 1914. Neill was promoted to Sergeant on 31 October 1914, and landed in France with the 2nd Battalion on 6 November. He was wounded on 22 December 1914, in the trenches at a point known as ‘Port Arthur’, near Neuve Chapelle, and evacuated to England on 9 January 1915.

Neill then joined the 6th Battalion on 23 April 1915, and served in the Mediterranean theatre at Gallipoli from 14 June. He was wounded again with a gun shot to the hip on 25 August 1915, when the Battalion was holding trenches at the head of Aghyl Dere, below Sari Bair. After the Gallipoli campaign he went with his Battalion to Mesopotamia, where he landed on 18 March 1916, and served there for the remainder of the War. He was awarded the D.C.M. for his services on 30 April 1917 at the ‘Three Ridges’ (Shatt-al-Adhaim) during the battle of ‘The Boot’ at Band-i-Adhaim. Promoted to Warrant Officer Class 2 on 21 May 1917, C.S.M. Neill finally sailed from Mesopotamia on 14 October 1918 and was discharged on 12 October 1919.

In the December 1937 East Lancashire Regimental Journal, a photo of Neill appears, apparently working on a paved road. At that time he was secretary of the Burnley branch and was living at Rosegrove, Burnley. During the Second War, Neill served in the Home Guard, earning the Defence Medal.

Dr David Biggins
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