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Medals to the KRRC 5 months 4 weeks ago #82482

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The IGSs to two brothers


Picture courtesy of Liverpool Medals

Described as:

IGS 1895 (1) Relief of Chitral, 5362 Pte E. Penney, 1st Battalion King’s Royal Rifles Corps
[ QSA (2) Talana, Defence of Ladysmith - his QSA is extant ]

Pte Penney was killed in action during the Boer War on 6th January 1900 at Wagon Hill whilst serving in the Defence of Ladysmith during the siege.

In the early hours of 6th January 1900, Boer Storming parties under General CJ de Villiers began climbing Wagon Hill and Caesar’s Camp. They were spotted and engaged by British working parties who were placing some guns.
The Boers captured the edge of both features, but could not advanced further, British counter attacks also failed.
At noon, de Villiers made another attack on Wagon Hill. Some exhausted defenders panicked and fled, but Hamilton led reserves to the spot and recaptures some empty gun pits. Late in the afternoon a terrific rainstorm broke out and the Boers withdrew under the cover of it.

In this extensive action the British were successful in repelling the Boer Attack, at a heavy cost to both sides.
The British suffered 175 killed with 249 wounded. 52 Dead Boers were left in the British positions, but total casualties were not recorded.

For his Boer War service he was issued posthumously the QSA with 2 bars for Talana and Defence of Ladysmith.

IGS 1895 (1) Relief of Chitral, 2200 Pte N. Penney, 1st Battalion King’s Royal Rifles Corps, later Bandsman in the Royal Navy.

Norman Penney born on 15th February 1864 in St Pauls Landsfort, Portsmouth.

Enlisted on 17th November 1877 with 1st Battalion K.R.R.C., having previously been a Musician aged only 14.
Served at home, 17th November 1877 – 24th Nov 1890
India, 25th Nov 1890 – 25th May 1897
Discharged in India and invalided home after 19 years 190 days service.

Campaigns, Isazai Expedition 1892 and Chitral Relief Force 1895.

“Owing the the fact that he is a married man. He is now debilitated and wasted, unfit for prolonged exertion, and there is chronic splenic enlargement. Disease is the result of climate, not of Military service or of epidemic or endemic causes and has not been aggravated by intemperance or other vice or by misconduct.

Having been invalided from the Army he actually instead joined the Royal Navy, becoming 356130 Bandsman Norman Penney, at HMS Royal Arthur on 17th November 1897.

He served until 27th June 1901 when he was Shore paid off.

In 1911 he worked as a Machinist at the Royal Small Arms Factory.
Dr David Biggins
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Medals to the KRRC 5 months 3 weeks ago #82567

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Picture courtesy of the London Medal Company

CMG n/b
DSO GV;
QSA (4) Orange Free State, Relief of Ladysmith, Laing’s Nek, Belfast; (LIEUT: H.B.P.L. KENNEDY. K.R.R.C.);
KSA (2) (LIEUT. H.B.P.L. KENNEDY. K.R.R.C.);
1914-1915 Star; (CAPT. H.B.P.L. KENNEDY. K.R. RIF. C.);
British War Medal and Victory Medal with MID (BRIG. GEN. H.B.P.L. KENNEDY.);
1939-1945 Star, with Boots style impressed naming; (BRIG. GEN. H.B.P.L. KENNEDY);
War Medal, with Boots style impressed naming; (BRIG. GEN. H.B.P.L. KENNEDY);
France: Croix de Guerre, reverse dated 1914-1916, with Bronze Palm;
Kingdom of Portugal: Military Order of Aviz, Grand Officer Grade, comprising next badge and breast star set of insignia, silver-gilt and enamels, the breast star bearing medallists details for Federico de Costa of Lisbon;
Kingdom of Portugal: Military Order of the Tower and Sword, Grand Officer’s Collar, silver-gilt and enamels, and of superb workmanship; also the ribbon and rosette emblematic of the recipient’s award of the Officer Grade of the same decoration.

Henry Brewster Percy Lion Kennedy was born on 13th August 1878 in Kensington, London, the son of Rear Admiral John James Kennedy, C.B., Royal Navy, and his wife, Isabella Frances Kennedy, formerly Evans, who were residents of 39 Onslow Square. Kennedy was educated at Eton between 1892 and 1895, and then entered the Royal Military College Sandhurst, being commissioned as a 2nd Lieutenant into the King’s Royal Rifle Corps on 12th October 1898, and promoted to Lieutenant on 18th December 1899.

With the Boer War, he then saw service in South Africa with the 1st Battalion from November 1899 when present on operations in Natal and in February 1900 was involved in the relief of Ladysmith. He was then involved in further operations in Natal between March and June 1900 and was in action at Laing’s Nek from 6th to 9th June 1900. Further operations followed in the Transvaal to the east of Pretoria between July and 29th November 1900 including the actions at Belfast on 26th to 27th August 1900, and Lydenburg on 5th to 8th September 1900. He then took part in further operations in the Transvaal from 30th November 1900 right through to 31st May 1902, and was also involved in operations in the Orange River Colony during 1902. Whilst the war was ongoing, Kennedy served as the Aide de Camp to Colonel Pitcairn Campbell between June 1901 and June 1902. Campbell was employed commanding a mobile force in the Eastern Transvaal at this time. Kennedy also served for a period during the war as Aide de Camp to Lieutenant Colonel F.D.V. Wing, who was also commanding a column.

Kennedy was promoted to Captain on 8th August 1904, and then served as the acting Aide de Camp to the General Officer Commanding in Egypt during 1906, and then as the Extra Aide de Camp and Camp Commandant to H.R.H. The Duke of Connaught whilst in Egypt for manoeuvres during 1907. In 1912 Kennedy was appointed Orderly Officer and Staff Captain to General H. Davis, who was commanding the 6th Brigade at Aldershot, and was then attached to the Territorial Force as the Captain and Adjutant of the 21st (County of London) Battalion - the First Surrey Rifles, London Regiment from 1st September 1913. Kennedy married on 26th November 1913, Ruby, the youngest daughter of Clarence Trelawny, see Salusbury-Trelawny Bt, with whom he had one daughter in 1915. His wife died in 1922.

With the Great War, Kennedy who was still a Captain and in service on attachment with the 21st London’s, was then present on service out on the Western Front from 15th March 1915 with the 1st/21st London’s, and remained the Adjutant until 1st September 1915, when he was promoted to Major and temporary Lieutenant Colonel and placed in command of the battalion, remaining in command until 16th May 1917 when he was appointed Brigade Commander of the 140th Infantry Brigade, and promoted to temporary Brigadier General. During his period in command of the 1st/21st London’s, he led the battalion during the Battle of Loos in September 1915, and during the Battle of the Somme in 1916 including the actions at Vimy Ridge, High Wood and Warlencourt.

For his service in command of the 1st/21st London’s, Kennedy was awarded the Distinguished Service Order in the King’s Birthday Honours List as published in the London Gazette for 3rd June 1916, and was also four times Mentioned in Despatches for gallant and distinguished services, the awards being published in the London Gazettes for 15th June 1916, 4th January 1917, 25th May 1917, and 4th June 1917, all earned out on the Western Front.

During his period in command of the 140th Infantry Brigade, he is also noted as having transferred to the Staff for a period. Kennedy was awarded promotion to Major and Brevet Lieutenant Colonel on 1st June 1917, and formed part of the Military Mission to Italy later that year, before returning to the Western Front for further service in command of the 140th Infantry Brigade, and remained in command through to the end of the war.

For his time in command of the 140th Infantry Brigade, he was further decorated with four more awards of a Mention in Despatches in the London Gazettes for 11th December 1917, 20th May 1918, 20th December 1918, and 5th July 1919; and was appointed a Companion of The Most Distinguished Order of Saint Michael and Saint George in the King’s Birthday Honours List as published in the London Gazette for 3rd June 1918. He was also awarded promotion to Brevet Colonel, gazetted to him in the New Years Honours List on 1st January 1919. In addition, Kennedy was decorated on four occasions by the Allied Powers, being thrice honoured by the Kingdom of Portugal, when awarded the Grand Officer Grade of the Military Order of Aviz, as published in the London Gazette for 24th October 1919; the Officer Grade of the Military Order of the Tower and Sword, as published in the London Gazette for 24th October 1919, and then immediately upgraded to Grand Officer Grade of the Military Order of the Tower and Sword, as also published in the London Gazette for 24th October 1919. He was also awarded the Croix de Guerre by the French Republic in the London Gazette for 15th December 1919.

Kennedy held various commands a brigade level post war when stationed over in Germany with the British Army on the Rhine, and had command of the 3rd Light Brigade from January 1919, the 2nd Rhine Brigade from March 1920, the 2nd Upper Silesian Brigade from September 1922, and then returned to command the 2nd Rhine Brigade from Septemebr 1923 to March 1924. Place on half-pay in the rank of Colonel on 12th April 1924, he briefly held the position of Assistant in charge of Foreign Attaches during the military manoeuvres held in England in 1926, and then retired in the rank of Brigadier-General on 1st June 1927. In 1929 he was appointed Chairman of the London and Provincial Sporting News Agency.

He continued to live in Knightsbridge, London, but with the outbreak of the Second World War, found himself recalled to uniform as a Colone (No.14942), being employed as a King’s Messenger during 1939 to 1940, and from 1st October 1940 through to 12th February 1942 as the Permanent President of the Eastern Command Interview Review Board for Officer Cadet Training Unit Candidates. Kennedy was then once again place on the Retired List in the rank of Brigadier General on 12th February 1942. Kennedy, whose hobbies included hunting, polo, and racing, was a member of the clubs of Whites, Bath, Queens, Newmarket and Sandown. He died on 8th December 1953 at Pelham Court, London.

GBP 9,500
Dr David Biggins
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Medals to the KRRC 5 months 6 days ago #82877

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From the next Spink auction.

CMG;
DSO GV;
QSA (3) Talana, Orange Free State, Transvaal (Capt: B. J. Majendie. K.R.R.C.);
KSA (2) (Capt: B. J. Majendie. K.R.R.C.);
1914-15 Star (Major B. J. Majendie. K. R. Rif: C.);
British War and Victory Medals, with MID (Brig. Gen. B. J. Majendie.);
France, Republic, Legion of Honour, breast Badge, with rosette, gold and enamel, with poincon mark to reverse downward tassel

CMG London Gazette 1 January 1919 (Salonika).

DSO London Gazette 14 January 1916.

French Legion of Honour London Gazette 21 July 1919.

Bernard John Majendie was born at Elvetham, Hampshire on 27 April 1875 and was commissioned from the Royal Military College Sandhurst on 1 January 1896.

Warren Hastings

He was present with a handful of Officers of the 1st Battalion, King's Royal Rifle Corps aboard the Warren Hastings at Cape Town on 6 January 1897, bound for Mauritius.

On board the Warren Hastings were 526 members of the King’s Royal Rifle Corps, 510 members of the 2nd Battalion York and Lancaster Regiment, and 25 members of the 2nd Battalion Middlesex Regiment, together with 20 women, 10 children, and 253 crew, totalling 1,244 people. A good passage was had until the morning of 13 January, when the glass fell and the wind shifted to the south. Despite reduced visibility there was no cause for concern and that night the troops went untroubled to bed. At about 2.20am on 14 January, a violent shudder was felt throughout the ship, as the Warren Hastings struck a rock off the coast of Réunion. Orders were given for the Rifles to fall in on the port side and the York and Lancasters on the starboard side. Through the torrential rain the ship’s Officers perceived that the vessel was aground and that it was possible to disembark by ropes on to the rocky coast. At 4.15am the ship began to heel to starboard. Twenty minutes later the electric lights went out. Thus by 5.00am those men on the starboard side, some in total darkness, were standing knee deep in water. The list gradually increased until the Captain himself thought the ship would turn over. Nevertheless the discipline for which the British soldier is famed prevailed, and the disembarkation was accomplished without a single fatality. The only lives lost during the whole episode were those of two natives who ran amok and jumped overboard. One Officer present later wrote:

‘Personally I look upon the whole business as one of the most creditable things to the British Army which has ever occurred, and without invidious comparison quite as creditable as the Birkenhead, for in the latter, if we are to believe the pictures, the men were at least all on deck, whilst on the Warren Hastings they were between decks, and quite unable to see what was going on.’

After a brief stay on Réunion, Majendie arrived in Mauritius with the rest of his comrades aboard the S.S. Lalpoora on 18 January 1897.

Boer War - Prisoner

He would serve during the Boer War (Queen's Medal & 3 clasps, King's Medal & 2 clasps), including at the Battle of Talana. Majendie also served attached to the 13th & 25th Battalion, Mounted Infantry from 14 June 1900 and as recalled in The History of the Prince of Wales' Civil Service Rifles:

'Captain Majendie’s experiences in the South African war had been somewhat unique and unfortunate. Whilst accompanying a troop of cavalry sent out as a patrol from Ladysmith on the day that war was declared, the party were surrounded and captured by the enemy and held prisoners in Pretoria until that place was taken by General Roberts in the following year.'

[ DJB - this is not correct ]

He was thence made Adjutant of the Prince of Wales' Civil Service Rifles in November 1902, their History recalls:

'Captain Majendie was the first Adjutant which the Corps had secured from the regular Regiment of which it formed a Volunteer Battalion; and by his efforts and instruction the Battalion became “riflemen,” and adopted rifle drill and customs. But the fact that officers were always trained at the Guards’ Schools of Instruction, where the drill of the rifleman is unknown, was a drawback to this arrangement.'

Great War - Survivor of Frezenberg Ridge

By the outbreak of the Great War, Majendie was by this point a Major and proceeded to France with the 4th Battalion, serving from 21 December 1914. By Spring 1915 he was in command of the Battalion, which had endured the first use of chlorine gas on 22 April at Ypres and on 8 May 1915 was in the line east of Bellewaarde Lake for the Battle of Frezenberg Ridge during the Second Battle of Ypres. In relation to which, the following extract is taken from A Brief History of the King’s Royal Rifle Corps 1755-1915 by Sir Edward Hutton:

‘On Sunday night, the 3rd May, in consequence of the increasing pressure in the northern sector of the salient, the 80th Brigade was silently and skilfully withdrawn to a position nearer to Ypres. On the 5th a further withdrawal was made, and a position was taken up east of Bellewaarde Lake, still nearer to Ypres, with the Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry and 4th Battalion in front line, and the 3rd Battalion in close support. On the 9th the 3rd Battalion relieved the gallant Canadians, who had been badly knocked about, while the 4th Battalion repulsed an infantry attack. On the 10th, after a terrific bombardment and a strong covering fire of machine guns and rifle fire, the enemy infantry essayed another advance, which was easily and promptly scotched by a well-directed rifle fire. Bellewarde Wood was now an impenetrable abattis, and the two Rifle Battalions were thus enabled to lend close and valuable assistance against the concentrated enemy attack to the south upon the neighbouring troops at Hooge. The 3rd and 4th Battalions in closest touch worked with great effect, and individual acts of gallantry were very numerous. By 6 p.m. the bombardment ceased, and the further advance of the enemy was effectively checked. By midnight the 4th Battalion was withdrawn and a bare remnant collected ; on the following day it was moved to a temporary bivouac, where the men lay down to sleep for a full night's rest after twenty-six days in the trenches, during a great part of which they had been closely engaged. The steadfast valor of the Riflemen was rewarded by a characteristic message from H.Q. Army Corps :

" The G.O.C. is lost in admiration at the way in which the 3rd and 4th Battalions have stuck out the pounding which they have received."

On the 14th the 4th Battalion, sadly reduced, was formed into a composite regiment with the remnant of the Princess Patricia's Canadian Light Infantry, and marched under Majendie again into the trenches until the 17th, when the Battalion moved to billets in the rear. On the 18th Major Widdrington rejoined the Battalion, and resumed command.’

Battle Honours of the King’s Royal Rifle Corps by T. N. F. Wilson quantifies the scale of the losses thus:

‘During the three days, May 8th - 10th, the 4th Battalion lost 15 officers and 478 other ranks. After the second enemy attack on May 10th, the 4th Battalion (3 officers and 98 other ranks, including C.O. and Adjutant) was formed into a Composite Battalion with Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry’.

Majendie - the C.O. - came out of the Battle with just 2nd Lieutenant Antrobus and Captain Ponsonby besides him. Swiftly embarked with his Battalion, he saw much service in Salonika and by war's end had risen to Major-General Commanding 65th Infantry Brigade, with no less than four 'mentions' (London Gazette 1 January 1916 (France), 6 December 1916, 28 November 1917 and 30 January 1919 (all Salonika), refers) to go with the two decorations.

Majendie reverted to command of the 3rd Battalion, King's Royal Rifle Corps in India in the early 1920s. By 1939 and happily retired, Majendie was living at Lynch House, Winchester. He died on 4 September 1959.
Dr David Biggins
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Medals to the KRRC 5 months 4 days ago #82943

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David – many thanks for adding another chapter to the lives of two of “my” 207 Smethwickians who served in the Boer War 1899-1902.

Both were born and bred in Smethwick and served in the 1st Battalion KRRC – Lance Corporal 8499 Joseph Clements & Private 5581 Robert Downes. Their service records show they both served in Mauritius prior to the Boer War and their start date there is given as 18 January 1897. So, both were aboard the Warren Hastings when she foundered.

The KRRC proved surprisingly popular with Smethwickians and comes third in the regimental league table headed, not unsurprisingly, by two local regiments – South Staffordshire & Worcestershire. Listed below are the 18 who served in the KRRC – the asterisk denotes they are not apparent on the ABW Forum “name search” facility.

*Private 4280 William Austin, 1st Battalion, King's Royal Rifle Corps. (QSA 2 clasps)
Lance Corporal 8499 Joseph Clements, 1st Battalion, King's Royal Rifle Corps. (QSA 5 clasps, KSA 2 clasps)
Private 5581 Robert Downes, 1st Battalion, King's Royal Rifle Corps. (QSA 6 clasps, KSA 2 clasps)
Private 4508 Arthur Jessop, 1st Battalion, King's Royal Rifle Corps. (QSA 5 clasps)
Private 4429 Henry Peach, 1st Battalion, King's Royal Rifle Corps. (QSA 4 clasps)
Private 9175 Henry William Rawlins, 1st Battalion, King's Royal Rifle Corps. (QSA 2 clasps, KSA 2 clasps) - Wounded at Battle of Ladysmith 29/10/1899. Invalided home.
*Private 2938 Frederick Joseph Weston , 1st Battalion, King's Royal Rifle Corps. (QSA 3 clasps)
Private 9102 Frederick Colclough, 2nd Battalion, King's Royal Rifle Corps. (QSA 3 clasps)
*Private 8275 Alfred Edward Dickinson, 2nd Battalion, King's Royal Rifle Corps. (QSA 3 clasps)
Private 9451 John Turner, 2nd Battalion, King's Royal Rifle Corps. (QSA 2 clasps)
Private 459 Samuel Weller, 2nd Battalion, King's Royal Rifle Corps. (QSA 3 clasps)
Private 1963 Thomas Winter , 2nd Battalion, King's Royal Rifle Corps. (QSA 1 clasp)
Corporal 5431 Albert Henry Buckerfield, 3rd Battalion, King's Royal Rifle Corps. (QSA 2 clasps) - Wounded at Ladysmith 27/02/1900. Invalided home.
Private 6458 William Leavesley, 3rd Battalion, King's Royal Rifle Corps. (QSA 5 clasps, KSA 2 clasps)
*Private 8775 Arthur James Lewis, 3rd Battalion, King's Royal Rifle Corps. (QSA 5 clasps, KSA 2 clasps)
Private 1829 William Lomas, 3rd Battalion, King's Royal Rifle Corps. (QSA 4 clasps, KSA 2 clasps)
Private 8550 Henry Smith, 3rd Battalion, King's Royal Rifle Corps. (QSA 3 clasps, KSA 2 clasps) - Wounded and invalided home 23/05/1900. Returned to the fray.
Private 2960 Samuel Simpson, 4th Battalion, King's Royal Rifle Corps. (QSA 5 clasps)
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Medals to the KRRC 1 week 6 days ago #85754

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Picture courtesy of Spink

IGS 1895 (1) Relief of Chitral 1895 (5000 Pte. T. Groom 1st. Bn. K. R. Rifle Corps);
QSA (5) Cape Colony, Orange Free State, Relief of Ladysmith, Laing's Nek, Belfast (5000 Pte. T. Groom, K.R.R.C.);
KSA (2) (5000 Pte. T. Groom K.R.R.C.).

Purchased Glendining's, July 1947, for £1/10 as part of a lot.
Dr David Biggins
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