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QSA with the British South Africa Company Medal 3 months 2 weeks ago #94772

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The pair to Trooper Bracken sold for a hammer price of GBP 900. Total GBP 1,159. R 26,700. AUD 2,160. NZD 2,360. CAD 1,910. USD 1,410. EUR 1,300
Dr David Biggins

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QSA with the British South Africa Company Medal 3 months 2 weeks ago #94774

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Picture courtesy of Noonan's

BSACM Rhodesia 1896, no clasp (Troopr. C. H. Jarvis. M.R.F.);
QSA (1) Defence of Kimberley (593 Pte. C. H. Jarvis. Kimberley Vol: Regt.);
1914-15 Star (Pte. C. H. Jarvis 7th Infantry);
British War and Bilingual Victory Medals (C.S.M. C. H. Jarvis C.A.H.T.C.);
Kimberley Star 'a' engraved ‘Municipal B. Section’, lacking integral top riband bar

Charles Herbert Jarvis was born around 1873 at Adelaide in the Eastern Cape, and served as a Trooper with the Matabeleland Relief Force in 1896 and as Private in the 2nd Battalion, Kimberley Volunteer Regiment during the Boer War before taking civilian employment as a timekeeper. He served with the 7th South African Infantry during the Great War, before joining the newly-formed Cape Auxiliary Horse Transport Corps on 1 April 1917, and travelled to France aboard Euripidies, arriving on the Western Front on 23 May 1917. Jarvis returned home at the cessation of hostilities aboard Ingoma, disembarking at Cape Town on 17 July 1919.
Dr David Biggins
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QSA with the British South Africa Company Medal 3 months 1 day ago #95153

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Pictures courtesy of Spink

BSACM Rhodesia 1896 (0) (1204 Pte. H. Reeder 4/Rif...);
QSA (5) Relief of Kimberley, Paardeberg, Driefontein, Johannesburg, Diamond Hill (1204 Pte. H. Reeder. Rifle Brigade.);
KSA (2) (1204 Pte. H. Reeder. Rifle Brigade.), obverses heavily polished

Spink say approximately 30 BSAC Medals issued to the 4th Battalion, Rifle Brigade, who formed No. 4 Section of the Rifle Company, Mounted Infantry Battalion in Rhodesia. At least four of the groups which include this Medal are known to exist in the Regimental Museum, including that to Lieutenant-Colonel Sir A. V. Jenner, Bt, CMG, DSO.

Horace John Reeder was born at Shoreditch on 16 September 1872 and went into Shap Street School in August 1880. A bootmaker by trade, he joined the Rifle Brigade on 29 April 1891, at that time having been serving in the 5th Battalion, Royal Fusiliers.

He served in South Africa from 2 May 1896-22 June 1897 (Medal without clasp) and thence from 28 October 1899-9 September 1902 during the Boer War. In that latter campaign Reeder served with the Mounted Infantry.

He died in June 1948.

Dr David Biggins
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QSA with the British South Africa Company Medal 3 months 16 hours ago #95168

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Picture courtesy of Spink

CMG n/b;
BSACM Matabeleland 1893 (Capt. A. B. Nolan 3rd Dragoon Guards);
QSA (3) Natal, Orange Free State, Transvaal (Capt: A. B. Nolan. A.P.D.);
KSA (2) (Cpt. A. B. Nolan. A.P.D.)

Spink say 3 BSAC Medals for 'Matabeleland 1893' to the 3rd Dragoon Guards, this unique to an Officer.

CMG London Gazette 3 June 1918.

Andrew Bellew Nolan was born on 3 June 1867. He became a 2nd Lieutenant with the 3rd Dragoon Guards on 5 February 1887 and was promoted to Lieutenant on 31 July 1889. He was promoted to Captain on 5 July 1893 and was sent out to South Africa as one of only three servicemen from the 3rd Dragoon Guards serving in the Matabele rebellion of 1893.

In July 1893, the Matabeles raided the Mashonas and then invaded the British settlement at Fort Victoria. It is not clear who instigated this action as King Lobengula was generally considered to be well disposed to the British. As action was considered necessary to defend the settlers and stop further Matabele encroachment, three mounted columns were organised; one at Tuli, one at Salisbury, and the third at Fort Victoria.

The Salisbury and Fort Victoria columns moved off and joined together at Intaba Zimbi (Iron Mine Hill), 16 October. They were attacked on the Shangani River, 24 October, and on the Mbembesi (M'Bembezu), 1 November. It transpired later that Lobengula had sent envoys to try to secure peace but, by mistake, they had been shot at Tati on or about 23 October, so the advance to Bulawayo was undertaken with the object of capturing Lobengula who had fled by the time his village was entered, 4 November. Messages were sent offering him safe conduct, but as no answer was received, on the 14th a force under Major Forbes was sent to capture him. On 3 December, it reached Shangani River and a small party of about 30 men under Major Alan Wilson crossed to arrest him.

Whilst these men were on the other bank, the river rose rapidly in flood, cutting them off. Here they were attacked by an overwhelming force of Matabeles, against whom they made their epic stand.

The Matabele chiefs eventually surrendered, 14 January, and Lobengula died of fever on the 23 January.

Nolan was the only Officer of the regiment present and was joined by Sergeant A. W. S. Donald and Lance Corporal J. Firm for the campaign. A total of 88 Medals were awarded to Imperial troops.

He was appointed to Paymaster with the Army Pay Department on 30 October 1897 and was allowed to take this Substantive rank on this appointment. He became the Staff Paymaster on 10 November 1904 and was also promoted to Substantive Major the same day. He was further given the promotion to 1st Class Assistant Accountant within the Army Accounts Department on 1 May 1905. Nolan was promoted to Substantive Lieutenant Colonel on 10 November 1909 and was given the role of 1st Class Accountant for the second time on 31 December 1909.

He remained in the United Kingdom for the duration of the Great War and was awarded a CMG on 3 June 1918 for his wartime service.

Retired from the Army in 1923 and in a civilian capacity became Director of the Fairbanks Gold Dredging Company Ltd and died on 5 March 1932 at New Park, Loughrea, Co. Galway, Ireland.
Dr David Biggins
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QSA with the British South Africa Company Medal 2 months 1 week ago #95405

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Picture courtesy of Semley Auctioneers

Described as:

The collection of Thomas William Glover (1858-1950) - a rare South Africa campaign group of three medals awarded to Thomas William Glover, Queenstown Volunteer Contingent, British South Africa Company Police (British South Africa Police), and Army Service Corps, comprising South Africa 1877-79 Medal with 1877-8 clasp, British South Africa Company Medal (Mashonaland 1890 Medal) with three clasps (Mashonaland 1890, Matabeleland 1893 and Mashonaland 1897), and Queen's South Africa Medal with Transvaal clasp, all with ribbons, the South Africa 1877-79 Medal named to 'PTE. W.T. GLOVER, QUEENSTOWN VOL: CONTGT.', the British South Africa Company Medal named to 'TPR. T.W. GLOVER, B.S.A.C.P.', the Queen's South Africa medal named to 'CONDUCTOR T.W. GLOVER', all with ribbons (3). Footnote - it is cited that only 15 men qualified for the B.S.A.C.P. Medal with three clasps although sometimes this tally is quoted as just 12 (see Edward C Joslin, ‘Observer Book of British Awards and Medals’, page 120, published by Frederick Warne & Co, 1973).



Dr David Biggins
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QSA with the British South Africa Company Medal 2 months 1 week ago #95406

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The previous lot in the Semley Auctioneers's sale are the papers for Thomas Glover


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Described as:

The collection of Thomas William Glover (1858-1950) - a 98-page typed work ‘Recollections of Life in South Africa 1874-1903’ is an abbreviated but nonetheless fascinating and historically interesting account of some of the experiences of Thomas William Glover in South Africa, including his several appointments to companies ranging from diamond prospecting to railway building, together with his own gold mining and farming enterprises (he pegged three claims in the foothills of the Slate Mountains near Umtali, Rhodesia (now Mutare, Zimbabwe), which he named ‘The Ancient’, ‘Golden Frog’ and ‘The Grand Duke’, all of which he subsequently sold to a syndicate, and had two farms which he named ‘Stableford’ and ‘Homefield’, situated about 13 miles from Salisbury, Rhodesia (now Harare, Zimbabwe), on the Gwibi River, covering between two and three thousand acres, farming Angora goats and ostriches, which were still being farmed under the same names by a tobacco company 20 years later). Thomas William Glover was born on 9th August 1858, and after leaving school aged 16, following a home visit to England from Port Elizabeth, South Africa, by his brother-in-law Cam Brown he was persuaded to accompany him on his return. Thus began his 29 year life in South Africa. He enlisted as a volunteer with the Queenstown Volunteer Contingent in late September 1877, and was awarded the South Africa Medal 1877-79 with 1877-8 clasp for his action in the Ninth Kaffir War, as Private in the Queenstown Volunteer Contingent, and as Sergeant in the Whittlesea Mounted Rifles. He recounts some of the action he saw here, pages 4 - 12. Arriving in Mafeking in the spring of 1890 Glover enrolled in the British South Africa Company Police (later, in 1896, to become the British South Africa Police) on March 11th, in the first days of its formation, firstly as Trooper, with the number 451, later as Corporal. In these recollections he recounts a skirmish with the Portuguese at Umtassa’s Mountain, Manicaland, in November 1890, and the distinguished battle at Chua Hill on 11th May 1891, in which some 51 British officers, non-commissioned officers, troopers and British South Africa Company pioneers overcame a combined Portuguese and native force of some 650 men. Glover was recommended for the Chua Medal but the award was not instituted. He is recorded in the book ‘Men Who Made Rhodesia’, by Colonel A.S. Hickman, pages 336-7, and his 1891 near death experience as a result of fever is told on page 148 of the same book, and again on pages 63-4 of the book ‘Blue and Old Gold, A Selection of Stories from The Outpost, the Regimental Magazine of the British South Africa Police’ (the story was also printed in the Cape Times). Following the uprising of the Matabele tribe of Zululand under King Lobengula in the late summer of 1893 Glover enlisted in the mounted volunteer force named The Salisbury Horse, and was present at the Battles of Shangani on 25th October 1893 and Imbenbesi on 1st November 1893, both of which are recounted in these memoirs. In July 1896, while assisting his cousin Stamford Brown with his store and hotel in Umtali, following the uprising of the Mashona people, Glover joined the local defence force, for which her earned his third clasp ‘Mashonaland 1897’. In 1901 he joined the Boer War, enlisting in the Army Service Corps, as Conductor firstly in No.15 Company, later in the Special Corps No. 36 Company at Mafeking, for which he was awarded the Queen’s South Africa Medal, with Transvaal clasp. After peace was declared in May 1902 Glover worked for several months resettling Boer families but, after a bad attack of malaria, was compelled to return to England in 1903, never to return to South Africa, a country which he made home, a country he described in his own words as ‘a wonderful country, so glorious in many ways’. He died in Christchurch, Hampshire, on 19th January 1950, in his 92nd year; together with a file of his photographs, maps, discharge certificates, and other ephemera relating to his life in South Africa; and two personal photograph albums containing 189 interesting albumen and silver gelatin prints, the first album (green) containing 96 photographs, circa 1901-1903, 94 measuring approximately 4.5 by 2.75ins. (11.4 by 7cms.) and two slightly larger, showing Kimberley diamond mines, diamond sorting, views of Johannesburg, etc., most with ink manuscript captions, the second album (blue) containing 93 photographs, again measuring approximately 4.5 by 2.75ins. (11.4 by 7cms.), with no captions in album but a loose photograph has a multi-line pencil caption to reverse so probably the same for most if not all of the others) (two files and two albums in the lot).
Dr David Biggins
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