Welcome, Guest
Username: Password: Remember me

TOPIC:

Medals to the Cape Mounted Rifles 1 year 1 month ago #70889

  • djb
  • djb's Avatar Topic Author
  • Offline
  • Administrator
  • Administrator
  • Posts: 26531
  • Thank you received: 2468
Jon,

What's not to like about that group?
Dr David Biggins

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Medals to the Cape Mounted Rifles 11 months 3 weeks ago #71822

  • djb
  • djb's Avatar Topic Author
  • Offline
  • Administrator
  • Administrator
  • Posts: 26531
  • Thank you received: 2468

Picture courtesy of DNW

SAGS (1) 1877-8 (Pte. F. Staunton, No. 6 Tp: C.M. Rifles.);
CGHGSM (2) Transkei, Basutoland (Cpt. F. H. P. de Lacy Staunton. C.M. Rifs.)

Provenance: The Armoury, November 1982.

Francis Henry P. de Lacy Staunton was born in Christchurch, Hampshire, in 1858, and emigrating to Southern Africa to farm, saw active service with No. 6 Troop, Cape Mounted Riflemen 1877-78, a period that witnessed his unit taking part against the Gaikas, Galukae and other Kafir tribes. Promoted Captain, Staunton saw further service in the Transkei and Basutoland operations of 1880 to 1881. During those campaigns, Staunton was appointed Chief of Staff to Major Elliot, chief magistrate for Tembuland. Staunton was later appointed Harbour Master of Port Shepstone, Sub-Collector of Customs, and placed in charges for a time of native police.

The following account of his service, written by Staunton himself, and dated 8 March 1889, survives in a letter written by the recipient when he applied for a civil service position:

‘Sir, In accordance with notice in the ‘Natal Mercury’ asking for applications for the post of Secretary to Land & Immigration Board, I have the honour to forward my application for the said post herewith –

I have been for six years & upwards in the customs dept at Port Shepstone and have had charge of the native police there –

Previously, I was in the Cape Mounted Rifles for several years and served for sometime as principal staff officer to Major Elliot, R.M. C.M.G. – now chief magistrate of Tembuland, Cape Colony – and to whom reference can be made –

A short time ago I applied for promotion and during an interview I had with his excellency last month, after seeing my testimonials and hearing the length of time I had served promised to enquire into my case and do what he could for me.

I have no doubt, should you entertain my application favourably I could be transferred immediately.

For local reference Mr Rutherford, the late collector and major Giles R. M Harding will testify to my character, ability and the satisfaction I gave them in all my official duties – I enclose testimonials in duplicate from Major Elliot also one from Major Giles and would ask that the originals may be returned to me – Hoping that you will view my application favourably and that my length of service may be taken into consideration.

Signed: F. H. P. de Lacy Staunton.’

Staunton’s position of Sub-Collector of Customs and Harbour Master at Port Shepstone was abolished on his retirement in November 1907, after serving twenty-five years with the colonial service.

A number of newspaper reports concerning Captain de Lacy Staunton’s death in 1912 vary as to his title. One described him as an old South African Constabulary officer, which probably relates to the time he was in charge of Native policemen. Another describes him as a Captain formerly of the Cape Mounted Rifles. The 1911 census describes him as a retired R.N. Captain (possibly a title given to him as port harbour master). However, all are clear that he had seen a considerable amount of active service, as he was engaged in both the Zulu war and in the South African campaign and resided in apartments at 7 Warwick Place, Worthing, before meeting his death by burning early on a Monday morning. The papers describe how a fellow lodger aroused from his sleep about four o’clock, amidst much smoke, found Captain Staunton lying in a huddled heap, with his clothes burnt almost to a cinder. Assistance was immediately obtained, but Captain Staunton died an hour later. At the inquest held by Mr. F. W. Butler on Wednesday it appeared that deceased suffered from chronic nervousness and was being looked after whilst his wife went into a nursing home to undergo an operation. The Jury returned a verdict of ‘Accidental death.’

Note: There is a Queen’s South Africa Medal with Transvaal clasp on the roll to a ‘Collector F. Staunton’ serving with the Transport Live Stock Recovery Department - it is quite possible that Collector Staunton and Captain Staunton are the same man as one is noted as ‘a collector’ in the TLSRD, and Captain Staunton was employed as a Sub-Collector, with some research articles referring to him as serving in the South African War.

Captain Staunton is mentioned in the book ‘Sugar and Settlers; A history of the Natal South Coast 1850-1910’.
Dr David Biggins
Attachments:

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Medals to the Cape Mounted Rifles 11 months 3 weeks ago #71823

  • Rory
  • Rory's Avatar
  • Offline
  • Senior Member
  • Senior Member
  • Posts: 2498
  • Thank you received: 1178
The QSA referred to is indubitably his - sad really as it is a first class group if complete.

Regards

Rory

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Medals to the Cape Mounted Rifles 9 months 3 weeks ago #73023

  • djb
  • djb's Avatar Topic Author
  • Offline
  • Administrator
  • Administrator
  • Posts: 26531
  • Thank you received: 2468
From the next City Coins auction, November 2020

Aliwal North, 11 March 1900

“Major General Sir E Y Brabant occupies Aliwal North and enters the Free State. Major Henderson and 150 of Montmorency’s Scouts gallop through the main street and make for the Frere Bridge over the Orange River. Although holes have been drilled in the bridge piers, they are not yet charged with dynamite and the bridge falls into British hands undamaged after a brisk engagement involving artillery on both sides. The British lose five killed, 17 wounded and four captured while five Boers were wounded”.
“The Anglo-Boer War: a Chronology” by Pieter G Cloete.

QSA (4) CC, Wepener, Tvl, Witt (3290 Pte. W.G. Dunning. Cape M.R.)

Pte Dunning was wounded in the Frere Bridge skirmish.
Dr David Biggins

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Medals to the Cape Mounted Rifles 2 months 2 days ago #77429

  • djb
  • djb's Avatar Topic Author
  • Offline
  • Administrator
  • Administrator
  • Posts: 26531
  • Thank you received: 2468

Picture courtesy of Spink

SAGS (1) 1877-8 (Pte. F. Staunton, No. 6 Tp: C.M. Rifles.);
CGHGSM (2) Transkei, Basutoland (Cpt. F. H. P. de Lacy Staunton. C.M. Rifs.)

Provenance: The Armoury, November 1982.

Francis Henry P. de Lacy Staunton was born in Christchurch, Hampshire, in 1858, and emigrating to Southern Africa to farm, saw active service with No. 6 Troop, Cape Mounted Riflemen 1877-78, a period that witnessed his unit taking part against the Gaikas, Galukae and other Kafir tribes. Promoted Captain, Staunton saw further service in the Transkei and Basutoland operations of 1880-81. During those campaigns, Staunton was appointed Chief of Staff to Major Elliot, Chief Magistrate for Tembuland. Staunton was later appointed Harbour Master of Port Shepstone, Sub-Collector of Customs, and placed in charges for a time of Native Police.

The following account of his service, written by Staunton himself, and dated 8 March 1889, survives in a letter written by the recipient when he applied for a civil service position:

‘Sir, In accordance with notice in the ‘Natal Mercury’ asking for applications for the post of Secretary to Land & Immigration Board, I have the honour to forward my application for the said post herewith –

I have been for six years & upwards in the customs dept at Port Shepstone and have had charge of the native police there –
Previously, I was in the Cape Mounted Rifles for several years and served for sometime as principal staff officer to Major Elliot, R.M. C.M.G. – now chief magistrate of Tembuland, Cape Colony – and to whom reference can be made –

A short time ago I applied for promotion and during an interview I had with his excellency last month, after seeing my testimonials and hearing the length of time I had served promised to enquire into my case and do what he could for me.

I have no doubt, should you entertain my application favourably I could be transferred immediately.
For local reference Mr Rutherford, the late collector and major Giles R. M Harding will testify to my character, ability and the satisfaction I gave them in all my official duties – I enclose testimonials in duplicate from Major Elliot also one from Major Giles and would ask that the originals may be returned to me – Hoping that you will view my application favourably and that my length of service may be taken into consideration.
Signed: F. H. P. de Lacy Staunton.’

Staunton’s position of Sub-Collector of Customs and Harbour Master at Port Shepstone was abolished on his retirement in November 1907, after serving twenty-five years with the Colonial Service.

A number of newspaper reports concerning Captain de Lacy Staunton’s death in 1912 vary as to his title. One described him as an old South African Constabulary Officer, which probably relates to the time he was in charge of Native policemen. Another describes him as a Captain formerly of the Cape Mounted Rifles. The 1911 census describes him as a retired R.N. Captain (possibly a title given to him as Port Harbour Master). However, all are clear that he had seen a considerable amount of active service, as he was engaged in both the Zulu war and in the South African campaign and resided in apartments at 7 Warwick Place, Worthing, before meeting his death by burning early on a Monday morning. The papers describe how a fellow lodger aroused from his sleep about four o’clock, amidst much smoke, found Captain Staunton lying in a huddled heap, with his clothes burnt almost to a cinder. Assistance was immediately obtained, but Captain Staunton died an hour later. At the inquest held by Mr. F. W. Butler on Wednesday it appeared that deceased suffered from chronic nervousness and was being looked after whilst his wife went into a nursing home to undergo an operation. The Jury returned a verdict of ‘Accidental death.’

Note: There is a Queen’s South Africa Medal with Transvaal clasp on the roll to a ‘Collector F. Staunton’ serving with the Transport Live Stock Recovery Department - it is quite possible that Collector Staunton and Captain Staunton are the same man as one is noted as ‘a collector’ in the T.L.S.R.D., and Captain Staunton was employed as a Sub-Collector, with some research articles referring to him as serving in the South African War.

Captain Staunton is mentioned in Sugar and Settlers; A history of the Natal South Coast 1850-1910.
Dr David Biggins
Attachments:

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Medals to the Cape Mounted Rifles 1 month 2 weeks ago #77629

  • djb
  • djb's Avatar Topic Author
  • Offline
  • Administrator
  • Administrator
  • Posts: 26531
  • Thank you received: 2468
The pair to Staunton sold this morning for a hammer price of £2,200. Totals (inc VAT on the commission for the UK only): £2,728. R52,200. Au$4,880. Can$4,540. US$3,700
Dr David Biggins

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Moderators: djb
Time to create page: 0.810 seconds
Powered by Kunena Forum