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Small Arms and Ammunition 6 months 2 weeks ago #81230

  • Neville_C
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Lid from box of Eley .303 cartridges (Boer purchase), found in the bed of the Vaal River at Fourteen Streams by Lieutenant Hugh Steuart Gladstone, 3rd K.O.S.B.

"Soft Nosed Express Solid Pointed Nickel Covered Bullet".

From the description on the label this seems to be the type I posted an image of earlier in the thread:
Lee-Metford soft-nosed bullet, found on Railway (or Kitchener's) Hill, to the NE of Hart's Hill, Tugela River. With headstamps "E B" (Eley Brothers). Listed in Bester 2003, p. 299, under Rare Examples: "Lead tip 7 mm long. Eley Brothers, London, UK. Ammunition most probably bought by Boers".

The illustration of the cartridge on the label does indeed have "E B" (opposed to "ELEY LONDON") headstamps. The lead tip is not immediately apparent, but the printed description clearly states that the bullet had a soft nose.









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Small Arms and Ammunition 6 months 1 week ago #81322

  • pfireman
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In London to Ladysmith P. 375 Churchill has this description of a Colt Machine Gun in operation. I can't seem to find a picture of this particular weapon. I'm including an extended quote because this engagement near Hussar Hill is where Churchill's Brother John 'Jack' is wounded.

The Colt Battery drew the cream of the fire, and Mr. Garrett, one of the experts sent out by the firm, was shot through the ankle, but he continued to work his gun. Captain Hill walked up and down his battery exposing himself with great delight, and showing that he was a very worthy representative of an Irish constituency.
I happened to pass along the line on some duty or other when I noticed my younger brother, whose keen desire to take some part in the public quarrel had led me, in spite of misgivings, to procure him a lieutenancy, lying on the ground, with his troop. As I approached I saw him start in the quick, peculiar manner of a stricken man. I asked him at once whether he was hurt, and he said something—he thought it must be a bullet—had hit him on the gaiter and numbed his leg. He was quite sure it had not gone in, but when we had carried him away we found—as I expected—that he was shot through the leg. The wound was not serious, but the doctors declared he would be a month in hospital. It was his baptism of fire, and I have since wondered at the strange caprice which strikes down one man in his first skirmish and protects another time after time. But I suppose all pitchers will get broken in the end. Outwardly I sympathised with my brother in his misfortune, which he mourned bitterly, since it prevented him taking part in the impending battle, but secretly I confess myself well content that this young gentleman should be honourably out of harm’s way for a month.

Also: Lord Dundonald's 'patented' maxim gun carriage.

"Lord Dundonald’s Galloping Gun-Carriage with Maxim." Creswicke SA War Vol 3 1900 Photo by Gregory & Co., London
L to L quote "The Colt guns worked very well, and the effect of the fire of a whole battery of these weapons was a marked diminution in the enemy’s musketry. They were mounted on the light carriages patented by Lord Dundonald, and the advantage of these in enabling the guns to be run back by hand, so as to avoid exposing the horses, was very obvious."
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Small Arms and Ammunition 6 months 1 week ago #81324

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This thread might be helpful:

Colt machine guns - calibre?
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Small Arms and Ammunition 6 months 1 week ago #81353

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I have completely lost the citation to where I found this image but I do have it and the caption.
“Laager outside the Market Square, Pretoria just before Lord Roberts’s entry.“

Some kind of Gatling Gun.
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Small Arms and Ammunition 6 months 1 week ago #81358

  • Elmarie
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Gen Piet Joubert's wife, Hendrina

She also had her own revolwer
Elmarie Malherbe
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Small Arms and Ammunition 6 months 1 week ago #81359

  • Elmarie
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Gen Piet Joubert's wife, Hendrina

Journal of Historical Sociology Vol. 17 No. 1 March 2004 ISSN 0952-1909

Men of Influence – The Ontology of Leadership in the 1914 Boer Rebellion

“Another leader was stern, bespectacled Hendrina Joubert, called “the general in petticoats”. The biographer of her husband, General Piet Joubert, has noted that “the true spirit of a Commandant-General was not in Joubert but in his wife”. Hendrina loved fire-arms, commando life and the odd battle. She accompanied her husband and shared his war experiences, while briskly rearing a family. At age 85 she was redoubtable, visiting rebel leaders in gaol, bearing pancakes. During the Rebellion she had wanted to travel by ambulance and join the rebel leader General Beyers; permission was refused by the premier, Louis Botha, himself.”
Elmarie Malherbe

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