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TOPIC: F Company, 2nd Volunteer Battalion, South Staffordshire Regiment, Hednesford

Hednesford, Staffordshire 1900-1901 4 years 5 months ago #40990

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I've always assumed it came from the local town hall or something similar to that.

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Hednesford, Staffordshire 1900-1901 2 weeks 3 days ago #66208

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"F" Company of the 2nd Volunteer Battalion Staffordshire Regiment, contributed 9 men to the active service contingent, which has just returned from South Africa. Of this little band one has died, and only three returned to Walsall on Tuesday last, the remainder being still on active service. The trio received a most hearty welcome from their fellow townsmen on arriving at the station from Walsall, where they had been met by the Company, 100 strong, under the command of Captain Holton, in company with other survivors of the South African campaign. Headed by the band the Company marched to the Drill Hall, through the crowded thoroughfares, and after a few appropriate remarks of welcome from Captain Holton, in which he invited the returned warriors to a supper on Thursday evening, the parade was dismissed.

The Lichfield Mercury, Friday 24th May 1901
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A very successful smoking concert was held in the Drill Hall on Friday evening by the officers and men of the F Company of the 2nd V.B. South Staffordshire Regiment. Amongst those present were Col. R. S. Williamson, Captain Holton, Sergt.-Major Sarsons, Sergt.-Major Hill, Captain Trewly, ex-Sergt.-Instructor Anderson, Colour-Sergt. Cook, Sergt. Cotterill, Quartermaster Wainwright, Sergt. Yates, Sergt. Spencer, Sergt. Gilbert, etc. Captain Holton announced to the gathering that the memorial tablet which was to commemorate the names of those who went from their company to the war had arrived, and they would be allowed to view it that evening, though the formal unveiling would not take place until the prize distribution in the new year. The monument is an Italian marble slab, surrounded with a frame of alabaster, and bears the following inscription: - "F Company, Hednesford. Erected by public subscription to commemorate the names of the men of the above company, who voluntarily and gallantly served their sovereign and country in the Boer War in South Africa, 1900-1901. Harry Bradnick, John Buckley, J. T. Kendall, Joseph Langley, William Perry, John W. Powis, Ed. Reynolds (died at Senekal), Daniel Seabury, and Major R. S. Williamson. Addresses were delivered by Colonel Williamson, Captain Holton, and others. During the evening songs were given by Private Gallatley, J. Mellor, J. Whistance, G. Watwood, and T. Borton. Mr. Dabbe, of Walsall, also contributed several humorous songs. The meeting concluded with cheers for Captain Holton, Col. Williamson, Sergt.-Major Hill, and Sergt.-Instructor Charlesworth. An unfortunate accident occurred to ex-Sergt.-Instructor Anderson, who whilst walking to the station to catch a special train which was taking a party to Rawnsley, fell down and fractured his leg in two places. He was heard shouting by a signalman, and was conveyed home, where he lies in a precarious condition.

The Lichfield Mercury, Friday 20th December 1901
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VOLUNTER PRIZE DISTRIBUTION AT HEDNESFORD.
On Thursday evening week the members of the F (Hednesford) Company of the 2nd V.B. South Staffordshire Regiment had their annual supper at the Anglesey Hotel, Hednesford. Afterwards the company adjourned to the Drill Hall for their annual prize distribution, and advantage was also taken of the occasion to unveil the tablet erected in the hall to commemorate the patriotism of members of the company in going out to South Africa in the Volunteer Service Companies. Mr. Alex. Henderson, M.P., was present to distribute the prizes, and Col. H. D. Williams, commanding the 38th-64th District, attended to unveil the tablet. There was a large and influential gathering present, including Col. Williamson (who presided), Major Thomas, Capt. and Adjt. Marchant, Capt. Holton, the Rev. J. F. Laing (chaplain), Lieuts. Burnett, Burnes, Griffiths, Truby, and Sherratt.

Capt. Holton said that when the first Service Company was sent out in 1900 five men were selected from F Company, and one of them, Edward Reynolds, died of enteric. For the second company three men were provided, and for the third company only one was required. Sergt. Moore was appointed sergeant in one Service Company. When the first lot of men returned a supper was arranged to welcome them, and at the table £14 was promised towards a tablet. That amount had since been increased to £35. Of this £29 was spent on the tablet and £1 was given to each of the men.

Col. Williams then unveiled the tablet, which was of white marble, with coloured marble moulding, with a suitable inscription and the names of the eight men who went to South Africa, as follow: - R. Bradnick, John Buckley, J. T. Kendall, Jos. Langley, W. Perry, J. W. Powis, Ed. Reynolds (died at Senekal), and Joseph Seabury. - Col. Williamson proposed a vote of thanks to Col. Williams, and spoke of the keen interest he took in the Volunteer movement and the good work done under him at the two last encampments. - Mr. Henderson, in seconding the motion, said he had been pleased to visit them on many former occasions, but he had never attended a meeting which gave him more pleasure than he had that night. There was nothing which gave more satisfaction in connection with the war than the manner in which the Volunteers had responded to their country's call. Men who, when they joined the Volunteers, had not the remotest idea that they would ever be asked to go on service in foreign lands, had at once come forward and volunteered. In all, over 16,000 Volunteers had gone to the front, and of this number 120 had gone from the 2nd V.B. South Staffordshire Regiment. This seemed to point to the fact that the wave of patriotism had been specially strong in South Staffordshire. He was sure the Volunteers who went to the front were worthy representatives, with others, who went from all parts of the Empire, of men who in the midst of calumny and lying slanders had done their duty. He felt convinced that Col. Williams did not want any thanks, but he was pleased that the vote had been proposed, because it gave him an opportunity of saying a few words to them. - Mr. T. M. Heape supported the vote, which was heartily carried.


The Lichfield Mercury, Friday 7th March 1902
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