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Drummer the dog, of the Northumberland Fusiliers 2 weeks 5 days ago #83733

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Hi Berenice,

After having a further look online, I would have to agree with you, there does appear to be a number of dogs of the Collie breed and at least a Dingo named "Bushie". The couple of relevant articles that I will include below are about the "official" dog named "Bushie". I was able to find another black and white photo and a great image from a postcard that I have collected.


The Bushies' Dog.

Photo, by Grouzelle, 308 George-street.

The mutual affection that exists between a bushman and his dog is well known. Recognising this, the Animals' Protection Society decided to present to the Bushmen going to South Africa a contingent dog. On the advice of the President of the Kennel Club a useful and companionable canine, belonging to Mr. Chiplin, of Wentworth Falls, was selected. Last week in the Chief Justice's Chambers the ceremony of christening the dog was performed by the Lieutenant Governor, Sir Frederick Darley said: "He is a very beautiful dog, and I wish him a hearty return from South Africa. I name him Bushie." Our picture represents "Bushie" and his custodian, Mr. A. Battye. Mr. F. Montague Rothery, Secretary of the Animals' Protection Society, has been looking after the dog in Sydney. He informs us that it is intended to present to Her Majesty the Queen a photograph enlarged from that from which our illustration was taken.
(The Sydney Mail and New South Wales Advertiser, NSW, Saturday 3 Mar 1900)


An Historic War Dog.

PET OF THE BUSHMEN'S CONTINGENT.

From Wentworth Falls to Royal Kennel.


FROM a humble cot at Wentworth Falls to the Royal Kennels in England is the brief record of "Bushie," the dog who died recently, and whose picture we reproduce on this page. Many of our readers will remember that "Bushie" was given to the New South Wales Bushmen's Contingent before that regiment sailed for the seat of war in South Africa. It was so presented by the Animals' Protection Society of New South Wales in recognition of the mutual affection that is always known to exist between the bushman and his dog.

"Bushie" was a rough bush collie, and was considered the most suitable breed to fill the part of regimental pet to the bushmen. It is claimed for him, too, and apparently rightly so, that he was the first dog officially sent to the war. True, other dogs have accompanied troops to the scene of action, but not with express official recognition.

The Lieutenant-Governor, Sir Frederick Darley, G.C.M.G., named the dog, and he then passed through the offices of the State Government and was officially inspected and recognised as on the strength of the contingent by the Premier of that day, Sir John See, and other members of the Cabinet, being finally handed over with due ceremony to the Orderly to Colonel Airey, Officer Commanding.

When his picture was painted, "Bushie" was 18 months old. He left with the contingent for South Africa on April 30, 1900. The landing in South Africa was at Beira, and by this time "Bushie" was a great pet with every man in the regiment, from the Colonel-in-command to the smallest boy bugler. He travelled through Rhodesia, visited the far-famed Mafeking, where, sad to relate, he lost the use of his hind legs through tick fever.

"Bushie," ever as a true soldier of the Empire, presented his face to the foe. He was wounded in the shoulder, and on two occasions taken prisoner by the Boers. He made his escape once, and the second time he was liberated, whether on parole, or otherwise, did not transpire. He was always daring, always ready to face any danger, and doubtless won in his doglike way more than one V.C.

The late Queen Victoria expressed a wish to have "Bushie" at the close of the war, and at the request of the New South Wales Contingent, Earl Roberts, the victorious Commander-in-Chief, undertook to present him to her Majesty at Windsor. The dog hero was received with every mark of respect and affection by the members of the Royal family, and given the place of honor in the Royal kennels.

Since then Sir Andrew Slater, the King's Land Steward, has had charge of him at Red House, Durrington, in Salisbury, where he died a few weeks ago. He became a great pet with Sir Andrew's family, and Mr. F. Montague Rothery, secretary to the Animals' Protection Society, to whom news of his death was sent, states that Sir Andrew Slater's youngest son watched for hours by "Bushie's" side, giving what comfort he could to the animal in its last hours.

The picture of "Bushie," from which our photograph is taken, was painted under official instructions by Mr. J. Wollaston Thomas, of Sydney, and, considering all the circumstances, it seems as if it ought to become the property of the State.

As a regimental pet. "Bushie" was famous, but as the favorite of Royalty he was even more so. He was a clever dog and well up to everything that was expected of him. At any rate his memory is worth honoring because the whole of the circumstances of his life are well out of the ordinary.
(The World's News, Sydney, NSW, Saturday 10 Nov, 1906)



A black and white photo of the above coloured postcard image was the relevant picture discussed in the above article.



Reverse of the postcard with information about "Bushie"


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Drummer the dog, of the Northumberland Fusiliers 2 weeks 5 days ago #83737

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What a great painting/postcard.

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Drummer the dog, of the Northumberland Fusiliers 1 week 5 days ago #83846

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...."An interesting little hero of the war has just arrived in London, and is the pet of all the visitors at a big West End hotel. The honour of popularity in the case does not fall upon a human being, but upon an ape—an intelligent creature that during the siege of Mafeking was taught to sound a bell directly the Boers commenced firing. The duty was performed with most conscientious care. The first sound of the cannon's boom awakened the watchful ape into intense activity. It gave the signal to the whole camp, and then, feeling its task was done, scurried to a place of shelter with an alacrity that betrayed deep respect for the enemy's guns. The creature has been brought home by some invalided officer."


In the same issue, and presumably the same ape . . . . "On Tuesday, the Mafeking ape was brought under the hammer at Stevens' auction rooms in Covent Garden. The bidding was pretty brisk, beginning at ten guineas and rising to forty, at which price "General Snyman"—that being the name bestowed upon the gallant animal—was disposed of to Mr. Wilson."
The Blackburn Times, Saturday 25th August 1900

The 2022 equivalent of 40 guineas (£40 and 40 shillings, or £42) is around £5,500.

* Edit - by December 1904 the ape was part of Bostock and Wombwell's Menagerie, which visited Berwick-upon-Tweed at that time.
books.google.co.uk/books?id=PozPBQAAQBAJ...feking%20ape&f=false
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Drummer the dog, of the Northumberland Fusiliers 1 week 4 days ago #83867

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BereniceUK wrote: The body of the late Lieutenant Jenkins, of Dowlais, who was killed at the Battle of Colenso, was discovered by Surgeon-lieutenant Briscoe. The lieutenant's little dog was lying alongside the body of its dead master.
The Western Mail, Saturday 10th March 1900


Hi Berenice,

I have found this story below which I believe may be linked to the above article about a little dog found dead beside his Master at the Battle of Colenso. The Lt. Jenkins in your article is Lieutenant Charles Morris Jenkins of Thorneycroft's Mounted Infantry, as reported was killed in action at the battle of Colenso December 15th, 1899. He was 32 years of age and was formerly a sergeant in the Glamorgan Infantry Volunteers. Lieutenant Jenkins went to South Africa about 1889, and being a civil engineer was employed in the construction of the Harrismith Railway in 1891. From 1896 he was engaged on the Pretoria-Petersburg line, but in October 1899, he was ordered to leave the Transvaal. On reaching Natal he offered his services and was given a commission as Lieutenant in Thorneycroft's Mounted Infantry.


THE DOG OF THORNEYCROFT'S
HORSE.

Nominally, Towser belonged to his master; actually, he owned the regiment. He joined with his master, but from that day he ceased to be a private personage, and became the regimental dog. When the "fall in'' sounded Towser took his place at the head of the regiment, wet or fine, in daylight or darkness, he was always there. We had supplied him, as became a military dog on active service, with a neat coat of khaki paint, and emblazoned on his back by way of facings in red paint, were his name and regiment, and there is no doubt he was thoroughly proud of his getup. Off duty he unbent to a large degree, and though sticking very firmly to his own tent, in spite of the many temptations offered elsewhere, he shared his favours very equally among those of us who formed the inmates, sleeping in turn with each other cuddled up under the blankets, and being quite impartial in accepting his rations from any that offered. So he continued, the friend of a few, the leader of all, carIng nothing for bullets and dearly loving a skirmish, until the fatal day of Colenso, when he had come out as usual, and, sitting beside his master, signified his approval by excited barks. A few yards' advance was made, and the man struck full in the chest by a bullet, pitched forward on his head to move no more. The dog was surprised, then distressed, then overwhelmed. He had seen men killed before, but at the end the old affection for his master proved strongest, and, realising the truth, he sat beside him with his head bowed down, and shivered all over. In this position he remained for over half-an-hour, for he was still there when the regiment retired again. At length another bullet laid him beside his master. I hope that the Boers grasped the situation and buried them together.— B. Garland Matthews, in the "Empire Review."

(The Queenslander, Brisbane, Qld., Saturday 5 July, 1902)

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Drummer the dog, of the Northumberland Fusiliers 1 week 4 days ago #83868

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From the Illustrated London News of 30th December, 1899 (and reproduced in Droogleever's "Unbuttoned") here is a pic of Lt. Charles Morris Jenkins of TMI.

Regarding the "regalia" provided by Thorneycroft's for Towser, IL assumes that the mascot was provided with a coat PAINTED khaki!
Regards
IL.
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Drummer the dog, of the Northumberland Fusiliers 1 week 3 days ago #83870

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Clouston Cemetery, Colenso

Elmarie Malherbe
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