The DSO was instituted in 1886 and used the VRI cyper for issues up to an just after the death of Queen Victoria.  Listed here are all the DSOs awarded with the VRI cypher except this issued for the Boer War which can be found here.

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(456 Records)

 Surname   Forename   Rank   Notes   Unit 
Tullibardine, Marquis ofLieutenantTULLIBARDINE, THE MARQUIS OF (DUKE OF ATHOLL), Lieutenant, was born 15 December 1871, son of the 7th Duke of Atholl (who died in 1917) and Louisa (who died in 1902), daughter of Sir Thomas Moncrieffe, 7th Baronet.  He was educated at Eton; was Lieutenant, 3rd Battalion Black Watch, 1890-91; joined the Royal Horse Guards 28 December 1892, as Second Lieutenant, from the Militia, and became Lieutenant 30 December 1893; was specially employed with the Egyptian Army 18 January 1898 to 26 September 1898.  He served with the Egyptian Cavalry as Staff Captain to Colonel Birdwood; was present at the reconnaissance of Atbara, and at the Battles of Atbara and Khartoum; received the Medal and two clasps; was mentioned in Despatches twice (24 May and 30 September 1898), and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 15 November 1898]: "John George, Marquis of Tullibardine, Lieutenant, Royal Horse Guards.  In recognition of services in Egypt and the Sudan, including the Battles of Atbara and Khartoum".  The Insignia were presented to him by the Queen at Windsor 1 December 1898.  Lord Tullibardine became Captain 20 November 1899.  He served in the South African War, 1899-1902, on the Staff, attached to the Royal Dragoons, and was present at the Relief of Ladysmith, including operations at Colenso; operations of 17 to 24 January 1900, and action at Spion Kop; operations of 5-7 February 1900, and action at Vaal Kranz; operations on Tugela Heights 14 to 27 February 1900, and action at Pieter's Hill; operations in Natal, March to June 1900; afterwards as Lieutenant Colonel, commanding the 1st and 2nd Scottish Horse.  He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 8 February and 10 September 1901, and 29 July 1902; was given the Brevet of Major 20 November 1900, and received the Queen's Medal with three clasps.  In the European War Lord Tullibardine commanded the Scottish Horse Mounted Brigade, Home Defence; 1st Dismounted Brigade, Gallipoli and Egypt, 15 August 1914 to 26 October 1916, and was Brigade-Commander, 10th Cyclist Brigade, Home Forces, from 12 June 1917.  He was mentioned in Despatches for Gallipoli and Egypt; created a CB; received the Serbian Order of the White Eagle of Serbia, with crossed swords, Third Class.  His brother, Lord George Stewart Murray, Major, Black Watch, was killed in action in 1914.  His other brother, Lord James Thomas Stewart Murray, was a prisoner of war in Germany.  In a letter to the 'Morning Post', appealing for more recruits, Lord Tullibardine said: "With regard to the district of Atholl—the district I know best—there may still be a few men left, but I think not many.  I can only say that if there are any on my estate they can trust that their dependents will be looked after while they are away, that their places will be kept open for them".  He succeeded his father in 1917 as 8th Duke of Atholl.  From 1910 to 1917 he was MP (U) for West Perthshire; he was DL, and has been created an MVO.  "The Duke of Atholl has been described as a Highlander of the Highlanders, and he is a true Scotsman in his amusements—shoots, fishes and plays the national game of curling".  The Duke of Atholl married, in 1899, Katharine Marjory, OBE, daughter of Sir James Ramsay, 10th Baronet, of Banff.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Horse Guards
TweedieJohn LannoyLieutenant ColonelTWEEDIE, JOHN LANNOY, Colonel, was born 6 May 1842, fifth son of Captain Michael Tweedie, RA, of Quarter, Peeblesshire, JP for Kent, and of his wife, Frances, daughter of Richard Walter Forbes, of Watertown, County Aberdeen.  Educated privately, he passed for a direct commission, and joined the 97th (Earl of Ulster's) Regiment, 3 July 1800.  He became Captain in 1869 and Major in 1879.  In 1881 Major Tweedie served in South Africa with the Natal Field Force, with the Royal West Kent Regiment.  He became Lieutenant Colonel in 1884, and commanded the 1st Battalion (Queen's Own) Royal West Kent Regiment from 29 December 1884 to 29 December 1889, taking part in the Sudan Expedition in 1884 and 1885, and receiving the Nile Medal with clasp, and the Khedive's Bronze Star.  In 1885 and 1886 he served with the Sudan Field Force, was present at the Action of Ginniss, was mentioned in Despatches and created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 26 November 18861: "John Lannoy Tweedie, Lieutenant Colonel, Royal West Kent Regiment.  For Action at Ginniss, in command of the 1st Battalion Royal West Kent Regiment".  He became Colonel 11 June 1888, and from that date until 1 April 1897, when he went on half-pay, Colonel Tweedie commanded the 39th Regimental District.  He retired on 6 May 1899.  He married on 15 September 1891, Emma Constance, third daughter of William Craig Murray, of Avonmore, Ballybrack, County Dublin, and they had two daughters: Kathleen Hay Lannoy and Olive Murray Lannoy.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
(Queen's Own) Royal West Kent Regiment
UpcherRussellLieutenant ColonelUPCHER, RUSSELL, Lieutenant Colonel, was born 3 February 1844, son of E W Upcher, of Sheringham Hall, Norfolk.  He was educated at Harrow (West Acre), and entered the 67th Foot, as Ensign, 21 November 1862, and the 24th Regiment 9 January 1863, becoming Lieutenant 29 October 1866, and Captain 31 October 1871.  He served in the South African War of 1877-78—79.  In the Kaffir Campaign he commanded the Left Column, and he commanded the troops at the Battle of Quintana, and was present at the action of Kei River.  In the Zulu Campaign he commanded the 1st Battalion 24th Foot after the Battle of Isandhlwana.  He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 26 February and 26 March 1878, and 15 March and 21 August 1879.  He received the Medal with clasp, and was given the Brevet of Major 11 November 1878.  He was promoted to Major 4 September 1880; to Lieutenant Colonel 9 June 1882, and to Colonel 9 June 1886.  He served in the Burmese War of 1885-89; was mentioned in Despatches, GGO 864 of 1887; received the Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 25 November 1887]: "Russell Upcher, Lieutenant Colonel and Colonel, South Wales Borderers.  For services in Burma".  He commanded the 5th and 68th Regimental Districts; was created a CB in 1897; became Major General 6 July 1898.  Major General R Upcher retired on 3 September 1902.  He was Colonel, The Durham Light Infantry, from 1908.  In 1877 he married Marian Elizabeth, daughter of John Rogers, of Holt Hall, Norfolk, and they had one son and one daughter.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
South Wales Borderers
ValentineFrancis AlfridLieutenantVALENTINE, FRANCIS ALFRID, Lieutenant, was born in 1858, son of the Reverend William Valentine, Vicar of Whixley, Yorkshire.  He entered the Royal Navy in 1871; became a Lieutenant in 1882; served in the Boadicea in the Zulu War in 1879, gaining the Medals, and was in command of the Osprey's boats when on detached service for the suppression of the slave traffic in the Red Sea; Zanzibar, Mafic Chan Common Islands, and East Coast of Arabia in 1883.  In 1887-88 he took part in the Yonnie Expedition, being in command of the Naval Brigade assisting in the capture of Rohari, Rorrietto, and other towns, gaining the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 9 March 1888]: "Francis Alfrid Valentine, Lieutenant, Royal Navy".  He also received the Medal with clasp.  Lieutenant Valentine died on the 22nd August 1897.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Navy
Van SomerenWilliam WeymouthLieutenantVAN SOMEREN, WILLIAM WEYMOUTH, Lieutenant, was born 17 September 1876, at Madras, son of Godlies George Bennett Van Someren, Barrister-at-Law, and Mrs G 15 Van Someren.  He was educated at Clifton College and Sandhurst, and entered the Army 5 August 1896, as Second Lieutenant (unattached); joined ISC 8 October 1897.  He served in the Tirah Campaign and was present at the actions of Chagru Kotal, Arhanga and Sampagha Passes; at the reconnaissance of Saran Sar, and the action of 9 November 1897; at the Operations in the Waran Valley, and the action of 16 November 1897.  Also at the operations at and around Dwatoi and at, the action of 24 November 1897, and at the operations in the Bara Valley 7 to 14 December 1897.  Affair at Shinkamar 29 January 1898.  For his services in this campaign he was mentioned in Despatches (GGO No 244 of 1898), received the Medal with two clasps, and—for drawing the regiment (36th Sikhs) out of action at, the affair of Shinkamar 29 January 1898—was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 20 May 1898]: "William Weymouth Van Someren, Lieutenant, Indian Staff Corps".  Insignia presented by the Queen at Windsor, 25 June 1898.  He became Lieutenant, Indian Army, 5 November 1898; Captain 5 August 1905.  Captain Van Someren married, 30 June 1906, at Madras, Kathleen Beatrice Grahame, daughter of W F Grahame, ICS, and they have a daughter, Clare Kathleen Mary.  He became Major 5 August 1914, and was Double-Company Commander, 45th Rattray's Sikhs.  In the Great War he arrived in France 26 November 1914, and was wounded at Festubert on 21 December 1914.  Was GS03, War Office, 1 March 1918 to 4 June 1918; GSO3, North Russian Expeditionary Force, 5 June 1918.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Indian Staff Corps
VandeleurCecil Foster SeymourLieutenantVANDELEUR, CECIL FOSTER SEYMOUR, Lieutenant, was born 11 July 1859, and was gazetted to the Scots Guards as Second Lieutenant 6 February 1889, becoming Lieutenant 23 May 1892.  He was employed in the Uganda Protectorate 11 August 1894 to 26 August 1896, and served in the Unyoro Expedition, 1895 (Despatches and Medal).  For the Nandi Expedition, 1895-96, he was mentioned in Despatches and created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 3 November 1896]: "Cecil Foster Seymour Vandeleur, Lieutenant, Scots Guards.  In recognition of services during the recent operations against slave-trading Arabs in the Uganda Protectorate".  He was personally decorated by the Queen at Windsor 24 November 1896.  He was on Special Extra Regimental Employment 28 November 1896 to 5 April 1897, and took part in the operations on the Niger in 1897; in the Expeditions to Egbon, Bida and Ilorin.  He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 11 June 1897]; was given the Brevet of Major 25 June 1899, and received the Medal with clasp.  He was employed with the Egyptian Army 24 December 1897 to 8 December 1899; served in the Nile Expedition of 1898, and was present at the battles of the Atbara and Khartoum (slightly wounded).  He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 30 September 1898]; received the 4th Class Medjidie, and two clasps to the Egyptian Medal.  He became Captain 24 June 1899, and was on Special Service, South Africa, from 17 October 1899.  He was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel, and was killed 31 August 1901.  Sir Arthur Conan Doyle says, in his 'Great Boer War' (page 467), when describing train-wreckings by the Boers: "Another train disaster of an even more tragic character occurred near Waterval, fifteen miles north of Pretoria, upon the last day of August.  The explosion of a mine wrecked the train, and a hundred Boers who lined the banks of the cutting opened fire upon the derailed carriages.  Colonel Vandeleur, an officer of great promise, was killed, and twenty men, chiefly of the West Riding Regiment, were shot.  Nurse Page was also among the wounded.  It was after this fatal affair that the regulation of carrying Boer hostages upon the trains was at last carried out".  Lieutenant General Sir Ivor Maxse wrote a biography, "Seymour Vandeleur", in the concluding pages of which he says: "Men of Seymour Vandeleur's stamp do not die in their beds, and it is in accordance with the lie they have chosen that they should meet death in the discharge of duty and in the service of their country.  But in Vandoleur's case it is bitter to think that when the end came he did not fall in the fair field of battle, where his life had been risked on so many occasions.  To be the victim of a pitiful highway robbery, murdered in cold blood without the chance of reprisal by a dastardly scoundrel who wrecked trains for loot—such is not the kind of death which his friends can contemplate without a feeling of vengeance in their hearts.  Yet, after all, it is a man's life not his death that matters, and the memory of Seymour Vandeleur as he was—a bright, ambitious, happy companion—still lingers with those who follow his calling and sympathize with his spirit.  To them he will ever remain an example of straight, young manhood, and of a life spent in the pursuit of that which is best and highest in the profession he loved, heedless of any notoriety it might happen to bring him.  To those who have read this memoir of his short career it will be obvious that he possessed a tenacious purpose through life, that he was rapidly developing along the natural lines of his character, and that he had emerged, a distinct personality, from the junior ranks of the Army.  But by those who worked with him for years in different places and had the best opportunities of judging his strength, Vandeleur's death is recognized as a distinct loss to his country.  Viewed in this light it was a public calamity, though this was known to few outside his profession... .  One purpose of this book is to afford to Vandeleur's countrymen a glimpse of what is being done by hundreds of picked officers, who are the real builders of the Dependencies and Crown Colonies of our Empire.  They long ago laid the foundations upon which our Indian Dominion was reared: they are now toiling ceaselessly and successfully in such places as Somaliland, Uganda, East Africa, Nigeria, the Egyptian Sudan—in fact wherever the Union Jack flies.  Sometimes recognized but more often snubbed by official England, their names are unknown to the British public, and rightly so, because men should not acquire notoriety for merely doing their duty well.  Their reward is in the knowledge that they are sowing seed which will ripen into an abundant harvest whose true value will be appreciated by future generations of Britons.  When, however, one of their number is cut off in the prune of his manhood and with his promise unfulfilled, it is meet that the story of his life should he recorded, as an instance of the toll exacted by Empire and a reminder to us who sit at home that there still are men whose pride it is to render service to the State". 
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Scots Guards
VernonHubert EdwardCaptainVERNON, HUBERT EDWARD, Captain, was born 7 May 1867, at Hanbury Hall, Worcestershire, son of Sir Harry Foley Vernon, Baronet, and Lady Georgina Sophia Baillie Hamilton, daughter of the tenth Earl of Haddington and Georgina, daughter of Archdeacon Robert Markham.  He was educated at Eton and Sandhurst; was gazetted on 20 June 1888, to the 1st Battalion The Rifle Brigade, which he joined in India, and served with it till 30 March 1892, when he was transferred to the 4th Battalion Captain Vernon served in Mashonaland in 1896, with Mounted Infantry, as Temporary Staff Officer.  He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 9 March 1897, and created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 7 May 1897]: "Hubert Edward Vernon, Captain, The Rifle Brigade.  In recognition of services during the recent operations in South Africa, 1896".  The Insignia were presented by Field Marshal Lord Roberts, Commander-in-Chief in Ireland, at a manoeuvre review parade 17 August 1897.  He was awarded the DSO for his services in Mashonaland, and particularly for the leading part he took in the storming of Makoni's Kraal, August 1896.  Sir F Carrington wrote of him in a Despatch, dated 3 December 1896, "that he was cool and dashing, an ideal Mounted Infantry officer".  He was transferred, 7 March 1897, to the 4th Battalion Rifle Brigade, of which he was appointed Adjutant in October 1897, a post which he held till October 1899, where, on the South African War breaking out, he was seconded for service on General Sir Francis Howard's Staff, and under him took part in the Siege of Ladysmith.  After the siege was raised he was in Sir Redvers Buller's advance to Lydenburg (forming part of the division commanded by General the Honourable Sir Neville Lytteltun), including the action of Bergendal.  Subsequently he served successively as Staff Officer to a Mounted Infantry Column, and as DAAG to the Inspector-General of Mounted Infantry, and saw much service in the Transvaal and Orange River Colony.  He was Staff Officer to Captain Jenner's Column under Colonel Alderson.  Brevet Major H E Vernon, DSO, died on 21 September 1902.  General the Honourable Sir Neville Lyttelton, Comniander-in-Chief in South Africa, wrote: "He was one of the finest officers I have ever known in the regiment, both in peace and war".  And again: "It was a sight to see him in action—a leader whom men would follow anywhere".  Lord Roberts wrote: "He was an exceptionally promising officer".  General Alderson, Inspector-General of Mounted Infantry in South Africa, wrote from Pretoria, September 1902: "I have known him since 1894.  He was with me in Rhodesia in 1896.  I then saw what an exceptionally fine and dashing officer he was.  For the last few months he has been one of my Staff officers, and I had got to appreciate his charming and upright personality and to realize his ability".  He was a splendid horseman, equally at home in the hunting field or at polo.  In 1898 and 1899 he played in several prominent polo matches.  He was a keen sportsman all round, both after big game in India and Africa and small game at home.  For the South African Campaign he received both South African Medals and seven clasps, and was several times mentioned in Despatches.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
(Prince Consort's Own) Rifle Brigade
WaceErnest CharlesCaptainWACE, ERNEST CHARLES, Captain, was born 19 March 1850, at Goring, Oxfordshire, son of the Reverend Richard Henry Wace, of Wadhurst, Sussex, and of Eulielia Wace.  He was educated at Marlborough College, and was gazetted to the Royal Artillery 15 December 1871, serving in the Jowaki Expedition, 1877-78, on the North-West Frontier of India (Medal with clasp for Jowaki).  He served in the Afghan War, 1878-80, with No 4 Hazara Mountain Battery, throughout the war, being in temporary command of it from 18 July to 23 September 1879, and from 29 October to 7 November 1879, and taking part in the capture of Ali Masjid and in the operations in the Lughman Valley (Despatches), and in the advance to the relief of Sherpur (Medal and two clasps, for Ali Masjid and Kabul).  He served in the Burmese Expedition, 1885-86, commanding the Hazara Mountain Battery until April 1886 (slightly wounded).  He was present at the capture of Mandalay and the subsequent advance to Bhamo.  At Bhamo he commanded the expedition by river to Moogoung, and also that against the Kachin tribes on the Chinese Border.  He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 2 September 1887], and, for the part he took in the Burmese War, as the Officer Commanding No 4 Hazara Mountain Battery, was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 26 November 1886]: "Ernest Charles Wace, Captain, Royal Artillery.  For operations in Burma".  He became Lieutenant Colonel, 18 May 1898, and was given the Brevet of Colonel 18 May 1902, and retired on 18 May 1903, as Colonel, Royal Artillery.  Colonel Wace married, in August 1891, in Bombay, India, Gertrude Mary Hay, daughter of Charles Nathan, FRCS, of Sydney, New South Wales, and they had one son and two daughters.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Artillery
WakeWilliam St AubynLieutenantWAKE, WILLIAM ST AUBYN, Lieutenant, was born 26 October 1871, and was gazetted to the Middlesex Regiment 18 June 1892, becoming Lieutenant 17 August 1894.  He was on Special Extra Regimental Employment 27 August 1898, serving under the Royal Niger Company, and taking part in the operations in the Niger Territories, including Benin Hinterland and Siama Expeditions.  He was wounded; was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 30 May 1899], and created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 30 June 1899]: "William St Aubyn Wake, Lieutenant, Middlesex Regiment.  In recognition of services during the recent operations on the West Coast of Africa". Lieutenant Wake died 4 February 1900, and the Insignia, Warrant and Statutes of the DSO were returned through the Foreign Office, and sent to the mother of Lieutenant Wake, Mrs Wake, 43 Brompton Square, London.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
(Duke of Cambridge's Own) Middlesex Regiment
WatsonJames KieroCaptainWATSON, JAMES KIERO, Captain, was born 19 June 1855, son of Major General James Watson (late 60th Rifles) and Mrs James Watson.  He was educated at Clifton College and Sandhurst, and was gazetted to the King's Royal Rifle Corps 25 April 1885.  In 1891 and 1892 he served in Burma, taking part in the operations in the Chin Hills.  He was attached to the Egyptian Army, 1894-99, and served in the Expedition to Dongola in 1896 as ADC to the Sirdar, being present at the operations of 7 June and 19 September.  He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 3 November 1896], received the Egyptian Medal with clasp, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 17 November 1896]: "James Kiero Watson, Captain, King's Royal Rifle Corps.  In recognition of services during the recent operations in the Sudan".  He served in the Nile Expedition, 1897, as ADC to the GOC, was awarded the 4th Class Medjidie, and received a clasp to the Egyptian Medal.  He was again ADC to the GOC in the Nile Expedition of 1898, and was present at the battles of the Atbara and Khartoum.  He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 24 May and 30 September 1898], received the Medal and two clasps to the Egyptian Medal, and was given the Brevet of Major 16 November 1898.  He served in the Nile Expedition of 1899, taking part in the operations which resulted in the final defeat of the Khalifa, as DAAG, Flying Column.  He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 30 January 1900], received the 4th Class Osmanieh and two clasps to the Egyptian Medal.  He served in the South African War as ADC to Lord Kitchener, 1899-1901, and was present at the Relief of Kimberley.  Also in the operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900, including operations at Paardeberg (17 to 26 February).  Operations in the Transvaal in May and June 1900, including actions near Johannesburg and Pretoria.  Operations in the Transvaal, east and west of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900.  Operations in Orange River Colony (May to 29 November 1900).  Operations in Cape Colony, south of Orange River, 1899-1900.  Operations in the Transvaal and Cape Colony, December 1900 to April 1901.  Operations in Orange River Colony 30 November to December 1900.  He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 16 April 1901], received the Queen's Medal and three clasps, and was created a CMG.  In 1901 Captain Watson returned to the Egyptian Army, and he became Major 19 October 1902, retired 3 May 1905, and was 1st ADC to HH The Khedive of Egypt from 1905 to 1914.  He was created a CVO in 1912.  Lieutenant Colonel J K Watson served in the European War from 1914; was Military Attache, Egypt, from 1916; was mentioned in Despatches, given the Legion of Honour, and created a CBE in 1919.  He married, in 1902, Katherine Emelia, daughter of H C Nisbet, of The Old House, Wimbledon, and they had one son.  He died in 1942.
CMG, CVO, CBE, DSO, IGS 1854 (1) Burma 1889-92, Queen's Sudan, QSA (3) RofK Paar Joh, 1914-15 Star, BWM, VM, 1911 Coronation, Turkey Order of Osmanieh, Turkey Order of Medjidie, France Legion of Honour 5th Class,  Romania Order of the Crown 1st type 5th Class with swords, Egypt Order of the Nile 4th Class, Belgium Order of Leopold II 3rd Class with rosette on ribbon, Khedive's Sudan (7) Firket, Hafir, Sudan 1897, The Atbara, Khartoum, Sudan 1899, Gedid.  Miniatures only DNW Apr 03 £650.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
King's Royal Rifle Corps
WayAlfred CottonCaptainWAY, ALFRED COTTON, Captain, was born 16 December 1860, at, Santa Warrea, India, son of Major Cotton Way, BSC, and Elizabeth Charlotte, daughter of Captain Eager, 90th Regiment.  He was educated at private schools, and joined the 31st East Surrey Regiment 29 July 1882; was transferred to the 24th Regiment in 1883, and to the Indian Staff Corps in 1886.  He served with the Burma Expedition, 1885-89; was mentioned in Despatches, and received the special thanks of the Commander-in-Chief for the capture of the Dacoit Chief, Bo Shway, also Medal with two clasps.  In 1886 Lieutenant Way rejoined the 24th Regiment, the South Wales Borderers.  He was seconded in 1890, and joined the Houssa Force, West Africa, and commanded the expedition against the ex-King Quasi Mensah, of Ashanti.  He rejoined the 24th Regiment in 1892; became Captain 9 June 1892, and exchanged to the 1st West India Regiment in 1893.  Captain Way was Staff Officer, Sierra Leone; Staff Officer in operations against Sofas in 1894 (Despatches [London Gazette, 28 February 1894]).  He served in the expedition to Gambia against Fodey Silah in 1894 as Staff Captain, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 8 June 1894]: "Alfred Cotton Way, Captain, West India Regiment.  In recognition of services during the recent operations on the West Coast of Africa".  He was appointed Garrison Adjutant at St Lucia, 1895-98, and retired from the West India Regiment 23 October 1897.  Captain Way died on 11 December 1911, at Bannenoby, Islay.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
West India Regiment
Wells-ColeHenryCaptainWELLS-COLE, HENRY, Captain, was born 9 May 1864, son of William Wells-Cole, of Fenton, Lincolnsiire.  He was educated at the Royal Military College, Sandhurst, and became Lieutenant, Yorkshire Light Infantry, 23 August 1884, and Captain 17 May 1892; was Adjutant, Yorkshire Light Infantry, 23 July 1897 to 25 January 1901.  He served on the North-West Frontier of India in the Tirah Expedition, 1897-98, was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 7 June 1898], received the Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 16 May 1899]: "Henry Wells-Cole, Captain, Yorkshire Light Infantry.  In recognition of services during the recent operations on the North-West Frontier of India".  The Insignia, etc, sent to the GOC, Mauritius.  DSO presented by the GOC Mauritius at a parade of the half battalion in Port Louis, previous to embarkation for South Africa, on the morning of the 6th October 1899.  Captain Wells-Cole served in the South African War, 1899-1902.  He was in command of the 2nd Battalion Yorkshire Light Infantry 2 June to 6 August 1900; served as Adjutant, 2nd Battalion Yorkshire Light Infantry, 30 November 1900 to 25 January 1901; was Assistant Provost-Marshal 20 January 1901 to 27 April 1901; was DAAG 28 April 1901 to 13 September 1902.  He took part in the advance on Kimberley, including the actions at Belmont, Enslin, Modder River and Magersfontein.  Operations in the Transvaal, west of Pretoria, August to November 1900.  Operations in Orange River Colony, May to August 1900, including actions at Lindley (28 June), Bethlehem (6 and 7 July) and Wittebergen (1 to 29 July).  He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901), was given the Brevet of Major 29 November 1900; received the Queen's Medal with four clasps, the King's Medal with two clasps, and was placed on the list of officers considered qualified for Staff employment in consequence of service in the Field.  He was promoted to Major 10 May 1902; was Officer, Company of Gentlemen Cadets, Royal Military College, 28 January 1903 to 28 August 1903; Commander, Company of Gentlemen Cadets, Royal Military College, 29 August 1903 to 22 January 1904; GSO2, Royal Military College, 1 March 1903 to 27 January 1908.  He was given the Brevet of Lieutenant Colonel in 1911; was GSO2, South Africa.  Lieutenant Colonel Wells-Cole died 30 April 1914. 
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
(King's Own) Yorkshire Light Infantry
WestlakeAlmond PaulLieutenantWESTLAKE, ALMOND PAUL, Lieutenant, was born 2 March 1858: was educated at King's College School, London; entered the Army as a Sub-Lieutenant (unattached) 29 November 1876; 3rd Dragoon Guards 29 November 1876; 70th Foot, 15 August 1877; Lieutenant Army, 29 November 1877; Madras Staff Corps 2 September 1878.  He served in the Afghan War of 1879-80 (Medal).  He married, in 1884, Alice Agnes, eldest surviving daughter of General W D'Oyly Kerrich, late RHA, and they had one daughter.  He served in the Burmese War of 1886-89; was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 2 September 1887], received the Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 25 November 1887]: "Almond Paul Westlake, Lieutenant, Madras Staff Corps.  For services in Burma".  He became Captain, Indian Staff Corps, 29 November 1888; Major, Indian Army, 29 November 1897.  He was Superintendent of an Army Remount Hearing Depot, Hapur, India, 1892-09; Lieutenant Colonel, Indian Army, 28 November 1903; Brevet Colonel 29 November 1906; commanded and reconstituted the 26th (KGO) Light Infantry, Indian Army, 1899-1909; was Commanding Hounslow Horse Depot 5 August 1914 to 14 September 1914; was Superintendent, Remount Depot, Ormskirk, Lancashire, 28 September 1914 to 31 March 1915; Commandant, Remount Depot, Ormskirk, Lancashire, 1 April 1915 to 23 June 1916; was Commandant, Remount Base Depot British Expeditionary Force, 23 June 1916.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Madras Staff Corps
WestmacottRichardLieutenant ColonelWESTMACOTT, RICHARD, Colonel, was born 16 March 1841, at Chastleton Rectory, Moreton-in-Marsh, Oxfordshire, second son of the Reverend Horatio Westmacott; was educated at Rossall, and entered the Bombay Army 19 March 1859.  He served in the Mutiny in 1859, and was present at the Siege of Beyt and at Dworka (Medal), and in 1860 in the operations against rebel Bheels in Gujerat.  In 1868 he took part in the operations against the rebel Naikras; was present at the action of Warak, and received the commendation of the Government (GPO 161 of 1868); in the Afghan Campaign of 1878-80 he was Road Commandant, commanding troops on the Lines of Communication, Quetta to Kandahar; took part in the engagements in the Khozak Pass; was present at the Relief of Kandahar (Despatches; GPO 645 and 975 of 1880; Medal and two clasps).  He served in the Sudan in 1885, taking part in the operations at Suakin, Hasheem and Tofrek; in various attacks on convoys and in the advance on Tamai (Medal with two clasps; Despatches [London Gazette, 25 August 1885]).  He became Lieutenant Colonel in 1885, and Colonel in 1889.  On 22 January 1889, Colonel Westmacott married, at Kirkee, India, Margaret Rose, elder daughter of Major General Caldecott, RA, CB, and their surviving son was Captain Guy Roudolph Westmacott, DSO, Captain, Grenadier Guards, born 16 July 1891.  Lieutenant Colonel Westmacott served with the Chin-Lushai Expedition, North-West Frontier of India, in command of an advance column on Haka (mentioned in Despatches, 990, 430, 1890), and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 14 November 1890]: "Richard Westmacott, Lieutenant Colonel, and Colonel, Indian Staff Corps.  For services in the Chin-Lushai Expedition".  (Insignia presented 22 January 1891).  He was created a CB (Military) in 1891; commanded the 28th Bombay Pioneers, 1889-95; commanded the 1st Brigade, Mohmand Field Force, NW Frontier, in the action of Bedmanai and others (Despatches 990,1318, 1897).  He served in the Tirah Campaign, 1897-98; commanded the 4th Brigade in the actions of Dargai twice, at the Sampagha and Arhanga Passes; reconnaissance of Saran Sar; action of 9 November 1897; operations at and around Dwatoi, action 24 November; operations in Dera Valley, 7 to 14 December; rearguard actions, 13 and 14 December; commanded at Shin Wara on 29 January 1898 (Despatches, GGO, 58 and 244, 1898; clasp; created a KCB).  He became Major General 22 June 1899; commanded a First Class District at Mhow, 1900-3; was on the Unemployed List from 16 March 1906.  Sir R Westmacott's favourite recreations were hunting, shooting and fishing.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Indian Staff Corps
WharryHerbertCaptainWHARRY, HERBERT, Captain, was born in 1857, son of Charles Wharry, Charlton Lodge, Thornton Heath, Surrey, and of Mrs Charles Wharry.  He entered the Army in 1876; became Captain, ISC, in 1887; served with the First and Second Miranzai Expeditions (Despatches; Medal and clasp).  He again saw active service in Waziristan, 1894—95, and was present at the action of Wano.  He was mentioned in Despatches; received a clasp, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 August 1895]: "Herbert Wharry, Captain, Indian Staff Corps.  In recognition of services during the recent operations in Waziristan".  The Insignia were presented 8 December 1895.  He died 23 September 1898.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Indian Staff Corps
WheatleyLeonard LaneSecond LieutenantWHEATLEY, LEONARD LANE, Second Lieutenant, was born at Newbridge, County Kildare, 18 June 1876, eldest son of Lieutenant Colonel Charles R E Wheatley, Royal Artillery, and of Mrs R E Wheatley.  He was educated at Wellington College, and at the Royal Military College, Sandhurst, and entered the Army 22 January 1890, as Second-Lieutenant (unattached), joining the Indian Staff Corps 1 April 1897.  He served on the North-West, Frontier of India, 1897—98, taking part in the defence of Chakdara, Malakand, and the action at Landakai; and in the operations in Bajaur and in the Mamund country.  He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 5 November 1897], received the Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 20 May 1898]: "Leonard Lane Wheatley, Second Lieutenant, Indian Staff Corps.  In recognition of services during the recent operations on the North-West Frontier of India".  The Insignia were presented to him by the Queen at Windsor 25 June 1898.  He was promoted to Lieutenant 22 April 1898.  He served in Waziristan in 1901-02; was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 8 August 1902], and received a clasp.  He became Captain, Indian Army, 22 January 1905, and Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, 22 July 1908; was Adjutant, Territorial Force, 25 August 1909; ADC to the Governor of Victoria 14 April 1911 to 30 June 1913; Officer, Company of Gentlemen Cadets, Royal Military College, 4 September 1913 to 26 November 1914; was promoted to Major 1 September 1915; GSO, Royal Military College, 27 November 1914 to 7 December 1915; Staff Captain, 168th Infantry Brigade, BEF, 5 February 1916 to 6 April 1916; Brigade Commander, 197th Infantry Brigade, British Armies in France, 3 April 1918 to 21 September 1918; Brigade Commander, 1st Infantry Brigade, British Armies in France, 22 September 1918 to 6 March 1919.  For his services during the European War from 1914 he was given the Brevet of Lieutenant Colonel 1 January 1917; and created a CMG 1918.  He married, in 1917, Esther, eldest daughter of Charles Fairbairn, of Banogill, Australia.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Indian Staff Corps
WilkinHenry DouglasLieutenantWILKIN, HENRY DOUGLAS, Lieutenant, Royal Navy, was born at Umbala, India, 27 March 1862, only son of Major H J Wilkin, 11th and 7th Hussars.  He was educated at Eastman's Preparatory School, and on HMS Britannia; was Midshipman on HMS Superb at bombardment of Alexandria, 1882, and during Egyptian War: landed with Naval Brigade during operations of Alexandria and Ramleh (Egyptian Medal, Alexandria clasp and Khedive's Star): Lieutenant-Commander of Widgeon during Gambia River Expedition, Vintang Creek.  1891-2; landed with Naval Brigade; First Lieutenant of Racer during second Gambia River Expedition, 1892; landed in command of Naval Brigade from HM Ships Racer, Sparrow and Alecto, in conjunction with 1st Battalion West India Regiment, resulting in the storming and capture of Fort Toniataba (Despatches, West African Medal: clasp; created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 10 January 1893]: "In recognition of his services in the recent operations on the West Coast of Africa, resulting in the capture of Tambi and Toniataba.  Henry Douglas Wilkin, Lieutenant, Royal Navy".  Decoration, Warrant and Statutes sent to Admiralty; Presentation reported by Admiralty 27 June 1893).  He commanded HMS Sparrow during the South African War; when in command of HMS Otter, rescued crew of HMS Sandpiper in a typhoon at Hong-Kong (promoted Commander); received Bronze Medal, Royal Humane Society, for jumping overboard and assisting to save a marine, the place being infested with sharks, 1883; while in command of HMS Clio, received the thanks of the Admiralty and Colonial Office for work done in connection with Tongan Islands, 1904-5; landed with British Naval Brigade at Shanghai, December 1905, for suppression of riots at Shanghai.  He married, in 1913.  Elfrida, younger daughter of  Egbert Iveson, of Charters, Ascot, and they had one son, Henry Egbert Peter, born 9 March 1914, and two daughters, Maureen Winifred, born 22 July 1915, and Barbara Marguerite, born 8 November 1916.  Captain Wilkin, who had retired, was appointed Senior Naval Officer at Belfast for the War.  He was promoted Rear-Admiral 1 October 1918.  His favourite recreations were shooting, hunting, polo and boat-sailing
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Navy
WilkinsJames SutherlandSurgeon MajorWILKINS, JAMES SUTHERLAND, Surgeon Major, was born 18 May 1851, and was educated for the medical profession, attaining the degrees of LRCP and MRCS.  He entered the Indian Medical Service as Surgeon 31 March 1874, and served in the Afghan War of 1880, taking part in the march from Quetta to the relief of Kandahar, and receiving the Medal.   He became Surgeon Major 31 March 1886, and again saw active service in the Burmese Expedition of 1886—87.  He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 2 September 1887], and received the Medal and two clasps.  He was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 30 May 1891]: "James Sutherland Wilkins, Surgeon Major, Indian Medical Service".  The Insignia were sent to the Commander-in-Chief in India and the presentation took place on 7 December 1891.  He was promoted to Brigade Surgeon Major, ranking as Lieutenant Colonel, 31 March 1894, and later became Colonel.  He married, in 1905, Dora Sophia Lee (who died in 1906), second daughter of the Rev F French, of Worlingworth Rectory, Suffolk, and they had one son.  Colonel Wilkins died 27 October 1916.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Indian Medical Service
WilkinsonHenry Thomas DiedrichCaptainWILKINSON, HENRY THOMAS DIEDRICH, Captain, was born on 19 June 1860, eldest son of Colonel H J Wilkinson, and of Mrs L C Wilkinson.  He was educated at St Columba's College, Ireland, and Sandhurst, and entered the Army 22 January 1881; became Captain 13 April 1887; served in Burma, 1885-86, being present at the storming of the Minhla Redoubt, when attached to the 12th Madras NI; was wounded; mentioned in Despatches 22 June 1886; received the Medal and clasp, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 25 November 1887]: "Henry Thomas Diedrich Wilkinson, Captain, Essex Regiment.  For services in Burma".  He became Captain, Reserve of Officers, in April 1893; Temporary Major 25 April 1915, 5th Battalion Duke of Wellington's West Riding Regiment; Attached Depot, Durham Light Infantry, till demobilized 15 September 1919.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Essex Regiment
WilkinsonThomas Henry Des VoeuxLieutenantWILKINSON, THOMAS HENRY DES VOEUX, Lieutenant, was born on 11 June 1858, eldest son of the Right Reverend the Bishop of St Andrews, and Caroline, daughter of Lieutenant Colonel Benfield Des Voeux, late Scots Guards.  He was educated at the Royal Military College, Sandhurst, and was gazetted to the Rifle Brigade in 1879; served in the Mahsud-Waziri Expedition, 1881; in the Burmese Expedition, 1886-88; was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 2 September 1887]; received the India Medal and two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 25 November 1887]: "Thomas Henry Des Voeux Wilkinson, Lieutenant and Adjutant, Rifle Brigade.  For services in Burma".  Captain Wilkinson received the Jubilee Decoration of 22 June 1897; was promoted to Major 5 September 1897.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
(Prince Consort's Own) Rifle Brigade
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