The DSO was instituted in 1886 and used the VRI cyper for issues up to an just after the death of Queen Victoria.  Listed here are all the DSOs awarded with the VRI cypher except this issued for the Boer War which can be found here.

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(456 Records)

 Surname   Forename   Rank   Notes   Unit 
SinclairAlfred LawCaptainSINCLAIR, ALFRED LAW, Captain, was born 30 April 1853, at Lifford, near Strabane, son of W Sinclair, JP and DL, of Holy Hill, Strabane, County Tyrone, and Sarah Strode.  He was educated at Kingstown School (Stackpoole's), and at Wimbledon School (Brackenbury's); and was Lieutenant, PWO, Donegal Militia, 1872-74; ADC to the Viceroy of Ireland, 1874; Lieutenant, King's Own Borderers, 1874-76; Lieutenant, Bombay Staff Corps (1st Baluch Battalion), 18 January 1877; Captain, Bombay Staff Corps, 2 December 1885.  He served in the Burmese Expedition in 1886-88; was mentioned in Despatches 2 September 1887; received the Medal with clasp, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 25 November 1887]: "Alfred Law Sinclair, Captain, Bombay Staff Corps.  For services in Burma".  He became Major, Indian Staff Corps, 2 December 1894; was Commandant, 129th DCO Baluch Infantry, 1896-1903; Lieutenant Colonel, Indian Staff Corps, 1900.  Lieutenant Colonel Sinclair retired 30 April 1908, and died 14 October 1911.  He married Kate Adele Jane, daughter of H P Rushton, of Calcutta, and they had one son, Malcolm Cecil.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Bombay Staff Corps
SitwellClaude George HenryMajorSITWELL, CLAUDE GEORGE HENRY, Major, was born 18 October 1858.  He joined the 85th Foot as Second Lieutenant from the Militia 14 September 1878, and served in the Afghan War, 1879-80, with the Kuram Division, Yarmusht Expedition (Medal).  He became Lieutenant, Shropshire Light Infantry, 1 July 1881, and in 1882 served with the Egyptian Expedition, being present at the defence of Alexandria, occupation of Kafr Dowar and surrender of Damietta.  He was promoted to Captain 13 July 1886.  From 11 May 1895 to 10 October 1899, he was employed in the Uganda Protectorate.  He commanded the expeditions against the Kitosh, Kabras and Kikelwa tribes, 1895.  For the Nandi Expedition, 1895-96, he was mentioned in Despatches.  In Uganda, in 1897-98; in February and March 1898, he commanded the operations against the Mwanga, and fought an action near Katonga River, and other engagements.  He was mentioned in Despatches; was given the Brevet of Lieutenant Colonel 4 October 1899 (he had been promoted to Major 13 October 1898), and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 24 January 1899]: "Claude George Henry Sitwell, Major, Royal Dublin Fusiliers.  In recognition of services during the recent operations in Uganda".  The Insignia were sent to the Foreign Office, and sent by the Foreign Office to HM Commissioner in Uganda.  Lieutenant Colonel C G H Sitwell's Insignia, etc, were returned by Sir R Buller, Lieutenant Colonel C G H Sitwell having been killed at Tugela.  The DSO, Warrant and Statutes were sent to Miss Blanche Sitwell for Colonel Sitwell's daughter, Miss C D C Sitwell.  Colonel Sitwell was killed in action 24 February 1900. 
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Dublin Fusiliers
SkeneCharles McDowallLieutenant ColonelSKENE, CHARLES McDOWALL, Lieutenant Colonel, was born about 1844, son of W A Skene, Lethenty, Aberdeenshire, and a kinsman of the Duke of Fife; was educated at Addiscombe, and joined the 43rd Gurkha Rifles (then the 43rd Assam Light Infantry), Indian Army.  He served in the North-West Frontier Campaign in 1863.  He married, 24 June 1870, at Ryde, Isle of Wight, Rosalie Purnell George, eldest daughter of Mr James Thorne-George, and had four children: Charles George; Madeleine; Alice Beatrice, and John Gordon.  He was present at the Forcing of the Ambala Pass in the Duffla Expedition in 1874; the Akka Expedition, 1873-74; the Burmese Expedition, 1886-89, when he took the Ruby Mines; was mentioned in Despatches, and created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 25 November 1887]: "Charles McDowall Skene, Lieutenant Colonel, Bengal Infantry.  For operations in Burma".  He commanded the Northern Column in the Chin-Lushai Expedition, and was repeatedly mentioned in Despatches from the Government of India.  Colonel Skene was killed in action at Manipur in March 1891, aged 47, having been transferred to 42nd Gurkha Rifles as Commanding Officer just previously.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Bengal Infantry
SkinnerGeorge JohnLieutenant ColonelSKINNER, GEORGE JOHN, Colonel, was born 16 June 1841, son of James Skinner, JP, and of Mrs Skinner.  He was educated at the Scottish Naval and Military Academy, Edinburgh; entered the 100th Regiment 16 September 1859; 38th Regiment, 1860, and BSC, 1865; became Captain, 1871; Major, 1879, and Lieutenant Colonel, 1885.  He served during the Afghan Campaign of 1879-80 with 3rd Bengal Infantry (mentioned in Despatches; Medal).  He became Colonel 16 September 1889.  For his services in the Chin-Lushai Expedition, 1889 and 1890, he received the thanks of the Government of India; the Medal with clasp; and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 14 November 1890]: "George John Skinner, Lieutenant Colonel, and Colonel, Indian Army".  Colonel Skinner was placed on the Unemployed List 16 June 1908.  He married (1) Robina Agnes (who died in 1876), daughter of Reverend W Asher, DD, and (2) Katherine Fox, daughter of Lieutenant Colonel A Baird.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Indian Army
SkinnerJames TiernayAssistant Commissary-GeneralSKINNER, JAMES TIERNAY, Lieutenant Colonel, was born in Bengal, 26 July 1845, son of R M Skinner, of the Indian Civil Service.  He was educated at Wimbledon and at the Royal Military College, Sandhurst, and entered the Royal Irish Regiment in 1864, joining the C & T Staff in 1866 and being appointed DAQMG in December.  In 1872 he married Jessie Rose, daughter of George Walpole Leake, of Perth, Western Australia.  He became Assistant Commissary-General in April 1880.  In 1884-85 he served in the Sudan Expedition (Medal and clasp and Despatches).  In 1885 he was promoted Honorary Lieutenant Colonel, and in that year and 1886 he served in the Nile Expedition, was mentioned in Despatches and created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 26 November 1886]: "James Tiernay Skinner, Assistant Commissary-General and Honorary Lieutenant Colonel, Commissariat and Transport Staff.  For the Action at Ginniss".  Colonel Andrew Haggard, on page 390 of 'Under Crescent and Star', says that the transport service was "admirably organized by Colonel Skinner, of the Army Service Corps".  In 1888 he was a Colonel in the Army Service Corps; he was AAG at Aldershot, 1889-93, and was afterwards AQMG at Headquarters.  In 1894 he was created a CB.  Colonel Skinner died 11 November 1902.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Commissariat and Transport Staff
SladenDavid RamsayCaptainSLADEN, DAVID RAMSAY, Captain, was born 7 February 1869, son of Lieutenant Colonel John Ramsay Sladen.  He was gazetted to the King's Own Scottish Borderers 13 June 1888, and served in the Sudan in 1888, being present at the action of Gamaizah (Medal with clasp; Bronze Star).  He took part in the operations on the Nile in 1889, and was promoted to Captain 21 July 1897.  In 1897 and 1898 he served in the Tirah Expedition; was slightly wounded; received the Medal and two clasps, and was mentioned in Despatches 1 March, and 5 April 1898, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 20 May 1898]: "David Ramsay Sladen, Captain, King's Own Scottish Borderers.  In recognition of his services during the recent operations on the North-West Frontier of India".  Insignia presented by the Queen at Windsor 25 June 1898.  He served in the South African War, 1900-2.  Operations in the Orange Free State February to May 1900, including operations at Paardeberg (17 to 26 February); actions at Poplar Grove, Karee Siding and Vet River (5 and 6 May).  Operations in the Transvaal in May and June 1900, including actions near Johannesburg and Pretoria.  Operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, in 1900.  Operations in the Transvaal, west of Pretoria, in 1900, including actions at Zilikat's Nek.  Operations in Cape Colony in 1900.  Operations in the Transvaal 30 November 1900, to March 1901.  Operations in Orange River Colony in March 1901 to 31 May 1902.  He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with three clasps, and the King's Medal with two clasps.  He was Adjutant, Volunteers, 1 September 1904 to 31 July 1908, and was promoted to Major 18 October 1907.  He served in the European War from 1914; became Lieutenant Colonel 3 December 1914, and Colonel 3 December 1918; commanded the 46th Infantry Brigade, British Armies in France, 2 August 1917 to 11 February 1918; Brigade Commander, Welsh Reserve Infantry Brigade, Home Forces, 13 April 1918 to 24 June 1918.  He was wounded, and was created a CMG in 1915.  He married, in 1911, Isabel, eldest (laughter of John Blakiston Houston, of Orangefield, County Down, and they had one son and one daughter.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
King's Own Scottish Borderers
Smith-DorrienHorace LockwoodCaptainSMITH-DORRIEN, HORACE LOCKWOOD, Captain, was born 26 May 1858, son of Colonel H A Smith-Dorrien and Mrs Smith-Dorrien, of Haresfoot, Berkhampstead.  He was educated at Harrow, and entered the Sherwood Foresters (Derby Regiment) on 26 February 1876.  He served in the Zulu War of 1879; was one of the few survivors of Isandhlwana, and was recommended for a VC; was at the Battle of Ulundi; was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 15 and 21 March, 1879], and received the Medal and clasp.  He took part in the Egyptian Expedition of 1882; raised and commanded a corps of Mounted Infantry; received a Medal and clasp, and the Bronze Star.  Sir Evelyn Wood wrote: "Horace Smith-Dorrien has done brilliant work in North and South Africa and in India.  It is needless to repeat what the Commander-in-Chief wrote of his conduct in the Retreat from Mons, which must have made his wife and all his friends proud.  In 1882 I was left twelve miles outside Alexandria with six battalions to cover a frontage of over five miles, which in the previous weeks, before the departure of another brigade, had been penetrated by small parties of the enemy, sixteen of whom had been killed in one garden.  I sent an order into Alexandria for a smart subaltern, who was to go to the Khedive's stable and all the saddlers' shops and produce in one day some mounted infantry.  Smith-Dorrien received the order at 1.30 pm, and at 6.30, with twenty-one horses, three mules and a donkey, carrying Derbyshire men, the Sherwood Foresters—few of whom had ridden before—he passed me at Ramleh, and went out into the desert, engaged an Egyptian outpost, killed its commander, and never let the enemy inside our line of outposts again".  Lieutenant Smith-Dorrien became Captain 22 August 1882.  He served with the Egyptian Army in the Nile Expedition (1884), and with Mounted Infantry in the Sudan Expedition (1885) (clasp).  He again saw active service in the Sudan in 1885-86, with the Frontier Field Force.  For his services in this last campaign Captain Smith-Dorrien was mentioned in Despatches, awarded the 4th Class Medjidie and created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 26 November 1886]: "Horace Lockwood Smith-Dorrien, Captain, Derbyshire Regiment.  For action at Ginniss".  The Insignia were presented to him by the Queen.  At the Battle of Ginniss, when the Dervishes were retreating, the cavalry posted to cut them off had failed to do so.  Captain Smith-Dorrien, at that time a Lieutenant Colonel on the Staff of the Egyptian Army, was thereupon ordered to take a mixed mounted force of cavalry and mounted infantry, and to pursue—with strict orders not to go beyond—to Koheymatto, 19 miles distant.  He, however, took on himself to go 60 miles, cutting across the desert to cut the Dervishes off at Absarat, accomplishing this in 23 hours, cutting off and capturing all the enemy's river transport, many prisoners and booty.  Being successful, his disobedience was rewarded with the DSO, as above recorded.  It was one of the first ever given.  In 1887 he received the 4th Class of the Osmanieh, and the same year joined the Staff College, where he gained the psc.  He became Major 11 May 1892; was DAAG, Bengal, 1893-94; AAG, Bengal, 1894-96.  He was DAAG of a brigade in the Chitral Relief Force in 1895.  In 1897-98 he served in the Sherwood Foresters in the Tirah Campaign, on the North-West Frontier of India; was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 30 September 1898]; was given the Brevet, of Lieutenant Colonel 20 May 1898; received the Medal and two clasps.  He served with the Nile Expedition of 1898, and in the pursuit after the Battle of Omdurrnan was the first to break into the Mahdi's house.  He commanded the troops which accompanied Lord Kitchener to Fashoda.  He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 30 September 1898]; received the Brevet of Colonel 16 November 1898, and the Medal.  He served in the South African War, 1899-1900, first in command of the 1st Battalion Sherwood Foresters, and then as a Major General commanding a brigade and a division.  At Paardeberg, Sir Conan Doyle writes in his 'Great Boer War' (page 253), "Smith-Dorrien's Brigade, who were winning in the western army something of the reputation which Hart's Irishmen had won in Natal, were placed astride of the river to the west, with orders to push gradually up, as occasion served, using trenches for their approach".  Sir Conan Doyle goes on to describe the battle, and later says: "The two brigades at either end of the Boer lines had lost no chance of pushing in, and now they had come within striking distance.  On the night of 26 February it was determined that Smith-Dorrien's men should try their luck.  The front trenches of the British were at that time seven hundred yards from the Boer lines.  They were held by the Gordons and by the Canadians, the latter being the nearer to the river.  It is worth while entering into details as to the arrangement of the attack, as the success of the campaign was at least accelerated by it.  The orders were that the Canadians were to advance, the Gordons to support, and the Shropshires to take such a position on the left as would outflank any counter-attack upon the part of the Boers.  The Canadians advanced in the darkness of the early morning before the rise of the moon.  The front rank held their rifles in the left hand and each extended right hand grasped the sleeve of the man next it.  The rear rank had their rifles slung and carried spades.  Nearest the river bank were two companies (G and H), who were followed by the 7th Company of Royal Engineers carrying picks and empty sand-bags.  The long line stole through a pitchy darkness, knowing that at any instant a blaze of fire such as flamed before the Highlanders at Magersfontein might crash out in front of them.  A hundred, two, three, four, five hundred paces were taken.  They knew that they must be close upon the trenches.  If they could only creep silently enough, they might spring upon the defenders unannounced.  On and on they stole, step by step, praying for silence.  Would the gentle shuffle of feet be heard by the men who lay within stone-throw of them?  Their hopes had begun to rise when there broke upon the silence of the night a resonant metallic rattle, the thud of a falling man, an empty clatter! They had walked into a line of meat-cans slung upon a wire.  By measurement it was only ninety yards from the trench.  At that instant a single rifle sounded, and the Canadians hurled themselves down upon the ground.  Their bodies had hardly touched it when from a line six hundred yards long there came one furious glare of rifle fire, with a hiss like water on a red-hot plate, of speeding bullets.  In that terrible red light the men as they lay and scraped desperately for cover could see the heads of the Boers pop up and down, and the fringe of rifle barrels quiver and gleam.  How the regiment, lying helpless under this fire, escaped destruction is extraordinary.  To rush the trench in the face of such a continuous blast of lead seemed impossible, and it was equally impossible to remain where they were.  In a short time the moon would be up, and they would be picked off to a man.  The outer companies upon the plain were ordered to retire.  Breaking up into loose order, they made their way back with surprisingly little loss; but a strange contretemps occurred, for, leaping suddenly into a trench held by the Gordons, they transfixed themselves upon the bayonets of the men.  A subaltern and twelve men received bayonet thrusts—none of them fortunately of a very serious nature".  He was promoted to Major General 11 February 1900, for distinguished service at the Battle of Paardeberg; was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 8 February and 16 April, 1901, and 29 July 1902], and received the Queen's Medal with four clasps.  He was Adjutant-General in India, 1901-3; commanded the 4th (Quetta) Division in India, 1903-7: was created a KCB in 1904; promoted to Lieutenant General on 9 April, 1906, and became Commander-in-Chief, Aldershot, 1907.  He was promoted to General 10 August 1912; held the Southern command, 1912-14; and was(Sherwood Foresters) Derbyshire Regiment
SmythOwen StuartCaptainSMYTH, OWEN STUART, Captain, was born, 14 August 1853, and was gazetted to the Royal Garrison Artillery 9 January 1873.  He served in the Afghan War in 1878 and 1880, taking part in the capture of Ali Masjid and in the operations in the Bazar Valley, in the action at Jugdullack, in the march from Kabul to the Relief of Kandahar, and in the battle of the 1st September.  He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 7 November 1879], received the Medal with two clasps, and the Bronze Star.  He again saw active service in the Burmese War, 1885-6-7 and 1891, was mentioned in Despatches and created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 26 November 1886]: "Owen Stuart Smyth, Captain, Royal Artillery.  For operations in Burma".  (The Insignia were presented to him by the Queen).  He served in the Wuntho Expedition of 1891, commanding the Southern Column; received a clasp, and was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 9 February 1892].  He took part also in the Manipur Expedition, 1891, was mentioned in Despatches 14 August 1891, and received a clasp, and he commanded mountain batteries at Intogh.  He became Lieutenant Colonel 31 December 1898, and was given the Brevet of Colonel 31 December 1892, retiring as Colonel, Royal Artillery, 11 June 1904.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Artillery
SpongCharles StuartCaptainSPONG, CHARLES STUART, Captain, was born at Faversham, Kent, 12 June 1859, son of W Nash Spong, FRCS, and of Mrs Spong.  He was educated at Epsom College, and Guy's Hospital; was FRCS, England, and joined the Army as Surgeon in 1887; was seconded to the Egyptian Army in 1890; served through the Sudan Campaign as SMO to the 1st Egyptian Brigade.  For his services in the Expedition to Dongola in 1896 he was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 3 November 1896], and received the 4th Class Medjidie.  He served in the Nile Expedition of 1887, and was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 25 January 1898].  He again served in the Nile Expedition of 1898; was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 24 May and 30 September 1898]; received the English Sudan Medal, the Egyptian Sudan Medal with six clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 15 November 1898]: "Charles Stuart Spong, Captain, Royal Army Medical Corps.  In recognition of services during the recent operations in the Sudan, including the Battle of Khartoum".  The Insignia were sent to the GOC, Egypt, and presented by him at a full dress parade of the Cairo Garrison 20 December 1899.  He was promoted to Major 27 July 1899, and has retired from the Royal Army Medical Corps.  He was appointed Medical Officer to the Egyptian State Railways.  He married, in 1890, Mary Barnsley, daughter of Henry Y Pickering, of Titusville, Pennsylvania, and they had one daughter.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Army Medical Corps
SpraggeBasil EdwardCaptainSPRAGGE, BASIL EDWARD, Captain, was born 9 October 1851, son of F H Spragge, JP, of Paignton, Devon; was educated at Cheltenham College, and Trinity College, Cambridge, and joined the 51st Light Infantry 19 October 1872; served in the Jowaki Expedition in 1877, as Orderly Officer to Brigadier General Doran (Medal with clasp).  He served in the First Campaign in First Afghan War in 1878-79, as Superintendent, Army Signalling (Despatches); in Second Afghan War in 1879-80, as Adjutant to regiment; assault and capture of Ali Masjid; operations in the Shiliman Valley and in the Bazar Valley (Despatches 7 November 1879; Medal and clasp).  He served in Burma, 1885-89, as DAAG and QMG; was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 25 November 1887]: "Basil Edward Spragge, Captain, King's Own (Yorkshire) Light Infantry, DAQMG, Bengal.  For services in Burma".  He retired 12 February 1890, with the rank of Major, and died at Cimiez 20 October 1915.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
(King's Own) Yorkshire Light Infantry
St LegerHenry HungerfordLieutenant ColonelST LEGER, HENRY HUNGERFORD, Lieutenant Colonel, was born 26 April 1833, and entered the Army, 18 August 1854.  He served in the Indian Mutiny campaign in 1858, being present with the Flying Column at the engagement on the banks of the Jumna and with the Camel Corps at the Battle of Gowlowlee, and at the capture of Calpee, and received the the Cameron Highlanders as Major, from the 71st Highlanders, and he became Lieutenant Colonel, Cameron Highlanders, 1 July 1881.  In the Egyptian Campaign of 1882 he was present at the Battle of Tel-el-Kebir (Medal with clasp, and Khedive's Bronze Star).  He served throughout the Nile Expedition of 1884-5 (clasp).  On 18 August 1884, he became Lieutenant Colonel Commanding.  "On the 31st March 1885, to the great regret of all ranks, Colonel J M Leith, CB, left the regiment to take up the appointment of Assistant Adjutant-General to the Suakim Field Force, and he was succeeded in the Command by Lieutenant Colonel H H St Leger, who became Colonel in 1885", and commanded the advanced posts and the Cameron Highlanders in the operations in the Eastern Sudan in 1885-86.  Colonel St Leger was present, as Commandant, at the defence of Fort Kosheh, during its investment, and at the action of Ginniss.  'The Records of the Cameron Highlanders' gives the following account of the preparations for the Defence of Kosheh: "On the 19th of November 1885, the headquarters and right half battalion, under Colonel St Leger, moved to Akasheh, being joined at Sarras by D Company.  They bivouacked for the night at Akasheh, and proceeded the following day by whale-boats to the Dal Cataract, and from thence to Firket, eight miles-further on.  On the 21st, in pursuance of orders, the headquarters and right half battalion moved from Firket to Mograkeh, an old Arab Fort in total ruins, which Colonel St Leger had been directed to place in a state of defence with a view to keeping open the communications between Akasheh and Kosheh.  Work was at once commenced, the old towers were loop-holed, the walls cut down and rendered defensible, and a zeriba was made around the most exposed sides.  In the meantime Lieutenant Colonel Everett and the left half battalion were working hard at the defences of Kosheh, where the trees were felled, the ground cleared, and a large zeriba constructed on the west bank of the Nile.  ...  On the 29th of December 1885, Lieutenant General Sir Frederick Stephenson attacked and dispersed the Dervishes at Ginniss.  ...  It was known that the Soudanese Army was approaching rapidly, and might be expected before Kosheh in a few days.  The garrison of Kosheh now consisted of one troop of the 20th Hussars, one troop of Mounted Infantry, a few British and Egyptian artillerymen, the Cameron Highlanders, and 100 men of the 9th Soudan Battalion, under Major Archibald Hunter; 150 blacks from the same battalion, under Major Borrow, occupied the zeriba on the west bank.  Mograkeh was held by the 3rd Battalion of the Egyptian Army, under Major Besant, and some of the Egyptian Camel Corps.  The armed steamers Lotus and Shaban patrolled the river".  For his services in this campaign Colonel St Leger was mentioned in Despatches by Sir Frederick Stephenson [London Gazette, 9 February 1886], and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 26 November 1886]: "For action at Ginniss, Henry Hungerford St Leger, Lieutenant Colonel, Cameron Highlanders".  He also received the Medal with clasp, and the Khedive's Bronze Star.  Colonel St Leger retired on 2 April 1883.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
(Queen's Own) Cameron Highlanders
StantonHenry ErnestLieutenantSTANTON, HENRY ERNEST, Lieutenant, was born at Yanworth, Gloucestershire, 10 November 1861, youngest son of Reverend Canon W H Stanton, Hasleton, Gloucestershire.  He was educated at Marlborough, and at the Royal Military Academy, Woolwich (and at the Staff College); joined the Royal Artillery 26 July 1881; served with the Upper Burma Field Force 1885-87, and 1887-88, in Mountain Artillery, and later on as Special Duty Officer; was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 2 September 1887]; received the Medal and two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 25 November 1887]: "Henry Ernest Stanton, Lieutenant, Royal Artillery.  For services in Burma".  He was Attache to the Intelligence Branch, India, 1887-88; Cadet Officer, Royal Military Academy, Woolwich, 1888-89; became Captain, 1 January 1890; Officiating DAAG, Bengal, 1894-95; Brigade Major, 1st Brigade, Chitral Relief Force, 1895; was present at the storming of the Malakand Pass, and action near Khar (Despatches [London Gazette, 15 November 1896]; Medal and clasp).  He was Staff Captain, Intelligence Branch, India, 1897; DAQMG, IB, Malakand and Buner Field Forces, 1897-98; was present at the action of Landakai, Bajaur and at the Tanga Pass; in operations against the Mohmands, Utmankhels, and with the Buner Field Force at the action at the Tanga Pass; mentioned in Despatches, 5 November 1897; 11 January 1898, and 22 May 1898; received the Brevet of Major 20 May 1898, and a clasp.  He was DAAG, Khyber Brigade, 1898; promoted to Major, 9 October 1899; was Assistant Military Secretary, Bombay, 1899-1902.  In 1899 he married Olive Talbot, daughter of General Sir R Low, GCB, and they had one son and two daughters.  He was AAG, India, in 1902; Chief Staff Officer, Somaliland Field Force, 1903-4, being present at the action of Jidballi (Despatches [London Gazette, 2 September 1904]; Brevet of Lieutenant Colonel, 7 September 1904; Medal and two clasps).  He was appointed ADC to the King in 1906, and given the Brevet of Colonel 1 December 1906; was General Staff Officer, 2nd Grade, 1908-9; 1st Grade (India), 1911; created a CB in 1911; was DQMG, India, 1912-14.  From August 1914, he served in the European War as officiating QMG, India; Brigadier General, in command of administration, Egypt; DA and QMG, Force in Egypt, and Coast Defence Commander.  He was mentioned in Despatches; promoted Major General for distinguished service; was created KCMG in 1919, and received the 1914-15 Star.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Artillery
SteadAlfred JamesMajorSTEAD, ALFRED JAMES, Major, served on the Indian Frontier, 1864-66 (Medal); in Afghanistan, 1878-80 (Medal); in Burma, 1885-87.  In the Burmese War he commanded a detachment at Pagan; was mentioned in Despatches (22 June 1886, and 2 September 1887); received a clasp, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 25 November 1887]: "Alfred James Stead, Major, Bengal Infantry.  For operations in Burma".  In 1891 he served in the Hazara Campaign.  He was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel 4 October 1887, and retired.  He died on the 20th of March 1909.   Lieutenant-Colonel Alfred James Stead, DSO, commanded a detachment at Pagan during the Burmese War and was twice Mentioned in Despatches (London Gazettes 22 Jun 1886 and 2 Sep 1987 refer), in addition to being awarded the DSO.  Already a veteran of the Bhootanese operations, where the 11th Native Infantry saw action with the Buxa Column, Stead had also witnessed active service in the Second Afghan War when he commanded the Left Wing of the 11th at Thai in the Summer of 1879, in addition to participating in the repulse of the enemy's attack on Ali Khel. Advanced to Major in October 1881 and to Lieutenant-Colonel in October 1887, he was latterly present in the Hazara operations of 1891.  The Colonel died in March 1909.
DSO, gold and enamel, IGS 1854 (3) Bhootan, Burma 1885-7, Hazara 1891 [Last two clasps loose on riband] (Lieut, 11th NI), Afghan (0) (Cap, 11th Ben. NI).  Spink 10 Dec 01.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Bengal Infantry
SteeleFrederick WilliamCaptainSTEELE, FREDERICK WILLIAM, Captain, was born 24 January 1858, and entered the 46th Regiment on 11 November 1876.  He served with the Egyptian Expedition in 1882; was present at the reconnaissance in force on Kafr Dowar, action at El Magfar and Tel-el-Mahuta, both actions at Kassassin, the Battle of Tel-el-Kebir (Medal with clasp, Bronze Star), and with the Sudan Expedition, 1884-85, as Transport Officer (clasp).  He had become Captain, Duke of Cornwall's Light Infantry, in 1886, and he transferred to the Army Service Corps in 1889.  He served on the West Coast of Africa in 1893-94, taking part in the operations against the Sofas, 1893-94 (Despatches [London Gazette, 28 February 1894]), and in the expedition to the Gambia against Fodey Silah.  For this he was mentioned in Despatches 4 May 1894; was given the Brevet of Lieutenant Colonel 2 April 1895, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 8 June 1894]: "Frederick William Steele, Captain, Army Service Corps.  In recognition of services during the recent operations on the West Coast of Africa".  He became Major in 1895.  The Insignia were sent to Captain Steele at Liscard, Cheshire.  He retired as Lieutenant Colonel from the Army Service Corps 2 February 1898.  Lieutenant Colonel F W Steele, DSO, died in January 1909, and an obituary notice of him appeared in the 'Times' of 5 January 1909.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Army Service Corps
StevensonAlexander GavinLieutenantSTEVENSON, ALEXANDER GAVIN, Lieutenant, was born 15 October 1871, son of Archibald Stevenson, South Garth, South Shields.  He was educated at Woolwich; entered the Royal Engineers 13 February 1891; became Lieutenant 12 February 1894, and was employed with the Egyptian Army 13 September 1895 to 12 November 1899.  He served in the Dongola Expeditionary Force, 1896 (Despatches [London Gazette, 3 November 1896]; Fourth Class Medjidie).  For the Nile Expedition of 1898 he received a clasp, and a clasp to the Egyptian Medal.  He served in the Nile Expedition of 1898; was present at the Battle of Khartoum; was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 30 September 1898]; received the Medal, and a clasp to the Egyptian Medal, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 15 November 1898]: "Alexander Gavin Stevenson, Lieutenant, Royal Engineers.  In recognition of services in Egypt and the Sudan, including the Battle of Khartoum".  The Insignia were presented to him by the High Commissioner of Cyprus, at Nigeria, 29 December 1898.  He served as Railway Staff Officer, South Africa, 15 January to 2 December 1900, and Locomotive Superintendent, South Africa, 5 July 1900 to 4 July 1901, and was promoted to Captain 1 October 1901.  He was present in the advance on Kimberley; operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900; operations in the Transvaal, Orange River Colony and Cape Colony, November 1900, to March 1901.  Captain Stevenson was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901], and received the Queen's Medal with three clasps.  He was employed on the South African Railways up to 30 June 1904; was employed on Central South African Railways (Special Extra-Regimental Employment), 1 July 1904 to 30 March 1905; employed on Railway Survey, Uganda and East African Protectorates, 24 May 1907 to 7 May 1909; Inspector of Iron Structures, HQ of Army, 1 October 1909 to 30 September 1913, and Inspector of Iron Structures, War Office.  He became Major 31 December 1910.  Major Stevenson served in the European War; became Temporary Lieutenant Colonel 15 August 1915; was mentioned in Despatches, and given the Brevet of Lieutenant Colonel 1 January 1915.  He was promoted to Colonel; was OC 20th Company, RE; was created a CMG in 1917, and a CB in 1918.  Colonel Stevenson married, in 1909, Elizabeth Nicoll, eldest daughter of Surgeon Major W Jobson, AMD, and they had two sons and one daughter.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Engineers
StewartCosmo GordonLieutenantSTEWART, COSMO GORDON, Lieutenant, was born 21 November 1869, 8th son of Sir J M Stewart, 3rd Baronet, and Lady Stewart, and was gazetted to the Royal Artillery 27 July 1888, becoming Lieutenant 27 July 1891.  He served in the Chitral Campaign, 1895, with the Relief Force from Gilgit; was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 16 July 1895], and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 16 July 1895]: "Cosmo Gordon Stewart, Lieutenant, Royal Artillery.  In recognition of services during the recent operations in Chitral".  The Insignia were presented to him 7 November 1895.  He was employed with the Egyptian Army 6 May 1897 to 25 December 1900.  In 1897 he served in the Nile Expedition (Egyptian Medal and clasp).  In the Nile Expedition of 1898 he was present in the Battle of Khartoum, was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 30 September 1898], received the 4th Class of the Medjidie, the Medal and the clasp to the Egyptian Medal.  He served in the Nile Expedition of 1890, in the first advance against the Khalifa (clasp to the Egyptian Medal).  He had become Captain on 19 November 1898.  Captain Stewart served in the South African War, 1901-02, on the Staff; took part in the operations in the Transvaal, May to December 1901; and in the operations in Orange River Colony, December 1901 to February 1902, and received the Queen's Medal with four clasps.  He became Major 1 April 1904; was DAQMG, Headquarters, India, 9 June 1906 to 5 December 1907; was DAAG India 6 December 1907 to 27 January 1939; GSO2, Staff College, 28 January 1909 to 21 December 1913.  Major Stewart was given the Brevet of Lieutenant Colonel 5 August 1914; became Lieutenant Colonel 30 October 1914, and served in the European War from 1914.  He was GSO1, 24th Division, New Armies, BEF, 16 May 1915 to 22 February 1916; temporary Brigadier General 1 April 1916; Brigade Commander, Home Forces, and commanding 183rd Infantry Brigade, BEF, 3 May 1916 to 29 July 1916; Brigadier General, RA, 33rd Division, BEF, 26 March 1917 to 28 July 1918; Brigade Commander, South Midland Reserve Brigade, Forces in Great Britain, 9 September 1918.  He was given the Brevet, of Colonel 3 June 1917; was mentioned in Despatches and created a CMG.  He married, in 1911, Gladys Berry, daughter of Dr J H Honeyman, of Auckland, and of Mrs Bruce-Porter, 6 Grosvenor Street, London.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Artillery
StreetAlfred William FrederickSurgeonSTREET, ALFRED WILLIAM FREDERICK, Surgeon, Indian Medical Service, Bombay, was born 22 October 1852, son of Reverend Benjamin Street, Vicar of Barnetby, Lincolnshire; became MRCS England, in 1874; LRCP London, in 1876; joined the Bombay Medical Service as Surgeon 1 October 1877.  Served in the Afghan War 1878-80; action on the Helmund 14 July 1880; cavalry affair 23 July 1880; battle of Maiwand, defence of Kandahar, and battle of 1 September (mentioned in Despatches, Medal with clasp).  He married, in 1884, Helen, daughter of the Reverend Edward Mitford Moongall, Vicar of Frodingham, Lincolnshire.  He served with the Burma Field Force (Despatches, London Gazette, 2 September 1887); Medal with two clasps; and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 25 November 1887]: "Alfred William Frederick Street, Surgeon, Indian Medical Service, Bombay.  For operations in Burma".  Surgeon Major 1 October 1897; Deputy Sanitary Commissioner, Bombay.  Lieutenant Colonel A W F Street died 30 January 1911.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Indian Medical Service
StricklandEdward PeterLieutenantSTRICKLAND, EDWARD PETER, Lieutenant, was born at Snitterfield, Warwickshire, 3 August 1869, third son of Major F W Strickland.  He was educated at Warwick School, and was gazetted to the Norfolk Regiment 10 November 1888, becoming Lieutenant 29 April 1891.  He was employed with the Egyptian Army 1 April 1896 to 31 March 1903.  He served in the Expedition to Dongola, 1896.  Operations of 7 June and 19 September He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 3 November 1896], and received the Egyptian Medal with two clasps.  For the Nile Expedition of 1897 he was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 25 January 1898], and received a clasp to the Egyptian Medal.  In the Nile Expedition of 1898 he was present in the battles of the Atbara and Khartoum, was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 24 May and 30 September 1898], was given the Brevet of Major 22 October 1899, and two clasps to the Egyptian Medal.  He served in the Nile Expedition of 1899, taking part in the operations on the White Nile against Ahmed Fedil's Army.  He was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 30 June 1899]: "Edward Peter Strickland, Lieutenant, The Norfolk Regiment.  In recognition of services during the recent operations in Egypt and the Sudan".  (Insignia presented by the Queen at Osborne 5 August 1899).  He was present also in the first advance against the Khalifa, and received a clasp to the Egyptian Medal.  He became Captain 21 October 1899.  From 3 February 1906 to 2 August 1913, he was employed with the West African Frontier Force.  He was promoted to Major 1 September 1908: became temporary Colonel, North Nigerian Regiment, 1909; was created a CMG, 1913; became Lieutenant Colonel, The Manchester Regiment, 1 June 1914.  He served in the European War from 1914 to 1918; was given the Brevet of Colonel 18 February 1915; was Brigade Commander, Jullundur Brigade, BEF, Indian Expeditionary Force 'D',4 January 1915 to 15 November 1915; Brigade Commander, 95th Infantry Brigade, BEF, British Armies in France, 16 November 1915 to 11 June 1916; Divisional Commander, 1st Division British Armies in France, 12 June 1916; promoted to Major General 1 January 1918; appointed Colonel, Norfolk Regiment, 24 December 1917.  For his services in the European War he was mentioned in Despatches, created a CB 1917, and a KCB in 1919; promoted to Lieutenant Colonel, Manchester Regiment, 1914; was given the Brevet of Colonel ^promoted to Brigadier General, 1915, and to Major General, 1918.  Sir Edward Strickland married, in 1918, Barbara, daughter of  Martin W W ffolkes and widow of Captain F J Cresswell.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Norfolk Regiment
Stuart-WortleyEdward James MontaguMajorSTUART-WORTLEY, THE HONOURABLE EDWARD JAMES MONTAGU, Major, was born 31 July 1857, second son of the Honourable F D Montagu Stuart-Wortley and the eldest daughter of William Bennet Martin, of Worsborough Hall, Yorkshire.  He was educated at Eton; was gazetted to the 60th Foot 13 October 1877, and served in the Afghan War in 1879-80, as Assistant Superintendent of Signalling with the Kurrani Field Force, and was present at the assault of Zawa, and mentioned in Despatches.  He became Lieutenant, King's Royal Rifle Corps, 13 March 1880, and in the following year again saw active service in the South African War, Transvaal Campaign, with the Natal Field Force.  He was employed with the Egyptian Army 21 December 1882; was Military Secretary to General Valentine Baker in Egypt in 1882; ADC to General Sir Evelyn Wood in Egypt, 1883-84, and was present at, Tel-el-Kebir (Medal with clasp, Bronze Star).  He served throughout the Nile Expedition of 1884-85; was present at the Battles of Abu Klea and Gubat, and in the reconnaissance under Sir Charles Wilson to Khartoum (Despatches [London Gazette, 10 March 10 April, and 25 August 1885]; two clasps).  He was Military Attache to Sir.  H Drummond-VVolff's special mission to Turkey in 1885.  In 1885 and 1886 he was DAAG to Sir F Grenfell, with the Sudan Frontier Field Force; was present at the action of Ginniss in 1886, and was given the Brevet of Major (2 March 1886).  He was created a CMG in 1886.  He was promoted to Captain 1 March 1885; to Major 4 April 1897, and was Second-in-Command of the Gunboat Flotilla in the Nile Expedition of 1897, being present at the occupation of Berber and at the actions of Metemmeh.  In the Nile Expedition of 1898 he commanded friendly Arabs at the capture of Omdurman.  He received the Medal; was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 30 September 1898], and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 15 November 1898]: "Edward James Montagu Stuart-Wortley, CMG, Major, King's Royal Rifle Corps.  In recognition of services during the recent operations in the Sudan".  The Insignia were presented to him by the Queen, at Windsor 1 December 1898.  Major Stuart-Wortley was Brigade Major, Malta, 18 August 1893 to 17 August 1896; was on Special Service, Egypt, 24 July 1897 to 2 December 1897; passed the Staff College.  He served in the South African War 9 December 1899 to 13 March 1900, on the Staff; raised and commanded a Volunteer Corps of Stretcher-bearers, and commanded a battalion of Rifle Reservists.  From 2 March to 20 June 1900, he was in command of the 2nd Battalion King's Royal Rifle Corps at the relief of Ladysmith, including actions at Colenso, operations of 17 to 24 January 1900, 5 to 7 February 1900, and action at Vaal Krantz; operations on Tugela Heights (14-27 February 1900), and also action at Laing's Nek (6 to 9 June).  Operations in Orange River Colony, May to October 1900.  He was mentioned in Despatches (Sir R H Buller, 30 March and 9 November 1900) [London Gazette, 8 February 1901]; was given the Brevet of Lieutenant Colonel 29 November 1900, and received the Queen's Medal with six clasps.  From 13 July 1901 to 12 July 1904, he was Military Attache at Paris and Berne; was created an MVO in 1903.  He was given the Brevet of Colonel 21 March 1904; created a CB in 1906, and became Colonel 23 February 1907; was Brigadier General, commanding the 10th Infantry Brigade, Shorncliffe, 8 April 1908 to 27 April 1912; was promoted to Major General 8 March 1913; commanded the North Midland Division from 1 June 1914 to 5 July 1916, in France, Belgium and Egypt, and the 65th Division, Home Forces, from 23 December 1916 to 18 March 1918.  He held the 2nd Class Red Eagle and Star; was an Officer of the Legion of Honour and a Knight of the Medjidie.  General Stuart-Wortley married, in 1891, Violet, CBE, daughter of James Alexander Guthrie, of Craigie, and they had one son and two daughters.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
King's Royal Rifle Corps
SunderlandMarsden Samuel JamesLieutenant ColonelSUNDERLAND, MARSDEN SAMUEL JAMES, Lieutenant Colonel, entered the Army in 1861; became Captain in 1876, and Major in 1881.  He served in the Nile Expedition, 1884-85, and actions of Abu Klea and Gubat (Despatches twice; Brevet of Lieutenant Colonel; Medal with two clasps; Khedive's Star); became Lieutenant Colonel in 1885, and Colonel in 1892.  He took part in the Hazara Campaign, 1888 (Despatches; Medal with clasp), and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 12 April 1889]: "For services during the operations of Hazara.  Marsden Samuel James Sunderland, Lieutenant Colonel, Royal Sussex Regiment".  He commanded 91st Regimental District, 1892-97.  His favourite recreation was farming Prince of Wales's pheasants, which he introduced into England in 1903.  Colonel Sunderland died 25 March 1914.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Sussex Regiment
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