The DSO was instituted in 1886 and used the VRI cyper for issues up to an just after the death of Queen Victoria.  Listed here are all the DSOs awarded with the VRI cypher except this issued for the Boer War which can be found here.

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(456 Records)

 Surname   Forename   Rank   Notes   Unit 
MacdonaldReginald PercyCaptainMACDONALD, REGINALD PERCY, Captain, was born 10 June 1856, eldest son of Major General J C Macdonald.  He was educated at Clifton College; served in the Royal Pembroke Artillery Militia, 1875 and 1876; joined the 67th Hampshire Regiment as Mounted Captain in 1884 (Medal); served in Burma Expedition, 1885-87, with the 2nd Battalion Hampshire Regiment, including the expedition to Moganney (Despatches, clasp; created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 12 November 1889]: "In recognition of services during  operations in Burma.  Reginald Percy Macdonald, Captain, The Hampshire Regiment.  Decorated for Distinguished Service when on active service in the field".  Insignia presented by the Queen 1 August 1890.  Lieutenant Colonel Macdonald married, in 1890, the daughter of Thomas Chard, of Ramsgate, and widow of Alexander Murray, of Old Polnvure, Stirling.  He retired from the Army 19 May 1892.  He was fond of all sports.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Hampshire Regiment
MacgregorCharles ReginaldMajorMACGREGOR, CHARLES REGINALD, Major, was born in 1847, son of Reverend Sir Charles Macgregor (3rd Baronet); entered the 96th Regt in 1868; was transferred to the BSC in 1872; Duffla Expedition 1874-5; Naga, 1875 and 1879 (twice mentioned in Despatches; Medal with clasp; Brevet of Major); in Afghan Campaign in 1880, including March from Kabul to Kandahar (Despatches; Medal with clasp; Bronze Star); in Mari Expedition in 1880 (Despatches); in Burma Expedition, 1897-8-9 (twice mentioned in Despatches; Brevet Lieutenant Colonel; clasp); created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 12 November 1889]: "In recognition of services during  operations in Burma.  Charles Reginald Macgregor, Major and Brevet Lieutenant Colonel, Bengal Staff Corps".  With the Wuntho Expedition in 1891 (Despatches); became Lieutenant Colonel in 1888.  In 1893 Lieutenant Colonel Macgregor married Maud, daughter of A des Moustiers Campbell, of Oakley House, Abingdon, Berks, and their surviving daughter was Helen Maud.  He became Colonel in 1895.  Served NWF 1897-8.  Colonel C R Macgregor, CB, DSO, died 20 June 1902.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Bengal Staff Corps
MacKayHuntley BrodieLieutenantMACKAY, HUNTLEY BRODIE, Lieutenant, became Lieutenant, Royal Engineers, 25 June 1881, and Captain 20 December 1889.  He served with the Bechuanaland Expedition under Sir C Warren in 1884-85 on special service.  Served in the expedition against the Younies, on the West Coast of Africa, in 1887-88; was mentioned in Despatches, and created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 12 April 1889]: "Huntley Brodie MacKay, Lieutenant, Royal Engineers, having local rank of Captain whilst commanding Royal Engineers on the West Coast of Africa.  For services during the operations in the Sulymah District".  He was promoted to Captain, and died in 1891.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Engineers
MackenzieColinLieutenantMACKENZIE, COLIN, Lieutenant, Royal Navy, was born in 1872, son of Donald Mackenzie, of Gairloch, Perth.  He entered the Royal Navy in 1885, and became Lieutenant in 1894.  He served in China, 1900.  He was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 9 November 1900]: "Colin Mackenzie, Lieutenant, Royal Navy.  In recognition of services in China".  The Insignia, etc, were sent to the Admiralty, and presented on 31 January 1901, at Hong-Kong, by Rear Admiral Sir J A T Bruce, Second-in-Command on the China Station.  Lieutenant Mackenzie was promoted to Commander in 1906.  He served in the European War on the Tigris River, and took part in the operations north of Qurna, and in the occupation of Amara, 1915.  He was mentioned in Despatches, and promoted to Captain.  He later was in HMS Warrior, in the Home Fleet, at Devonport.  In 1890 he married Clare, eldest daughter of Franklin Homan, and widow of Henry Stamford Harris.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Navy
MackenzieGeorge DouglasLieutenantMACKENZIE, GEORGE DOUGLAS, Lieutenant, was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 20 May 1898]: "George Douglas Mackenzie, Lieutenant, Gordon Highlanders.  In recognition of services during the recent operations on the North-West Frontier of India".  He died 9 March 1899.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Gordon Highlanders
MackinnonHenry William AlexanderSurgeon Lieutenant ColonelMACKINNON, HENRY WILLIAM ALEXANDER, Brigade Surgeon Lieutenant Colonel, was born in 1842, son of Inspector-General Charles Mackirinon, HEICS, of Millbrook, near Southampton.  He was educated at King's College, London (MRCS and LSA, London), and entered the Army Medical Service as Assistant Surgeon 2 October 1865; became Surgeon 1 March 1873, and Surgeon Major 2 October 1877; served in the Egyptian War of 1882, and was present at the Battle of Tel-el-Kebir, when he was slightly wounded.  For his services was mentioned in Despatches; he received the Medal with clasp and the Khedive's Star.  In the Burmese Expedition in 1885-86, he saw service with the Upper Burma Field Force, under Sir George White, and was part of the time Principal Medical Officer.  He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 2 September 1887]; received the Medal and clasp, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 8 December 1886]: "Henry William Alexander Mackinnon, Surgeon Lieutenant Colonel, Royal Army Medical Corps.  For operations in Burma".  Brigade Surgeon Lieutenant Colonel Mackinnon became Medical Officer for Recruiting, London.  He retired in October 1895, and died at Weybridge, Surrey, on 24 March 1905, aged 63.  He was twice married—in 1881, to Dora Jessie (who died in 1891), daughter of Surgeon General William Munro, CB, MD, and in 1893, to Mabel, daughter of Thomas Keown.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Army Medical Corps
MacMunnGeorge FletcherLieutenantMACMUNN, GEORGE FLETCHER, Lieutenant, was born 14 August 1869, eldest son of J A MacMunn, MD, Surgeon, RA, and PMO, Chelsea Hospital, and Charlotte Edith, daughter of the Reverend George Mathias, Chaplain Royal.  He was educated at Kensington Grammar School: was Gold Medallist, RA Institution; Gold Medallist, US Institution, India, 1904; passed the Staff College, 1903.  He entered the Royal Artillery 27 July 1888; became Lieutenant 27 July 1891, and Captain 5 December 1898: Major 1 April 1904; was Temporary Brigadier General 23 November 1915 to 27 March 1915; Temporary Major General 16 April to 31 December 1916; was promoted to Major General 1 January 1917.  He was Station Staff officer, South Africa, 1 April to 2 May 1900: APM, South Africa, 27 May to 12 September 1900; DAAG, South Africa, 11 April to 24 September 1902; DAAG, India, 1 November 1904 to 22 April 1908; DAQMG, Headquarters, India, 23 April to 31 October 1908: DAD of Remounts, War Office, 20 June 1914 to 6 July 1915; AQMG, Lines of Communication, Mediterranean Expeditionary Force, 7 July to 22 November 1915; DA and QMG, Dardanelles Army, Mediterranean Expeditionary Force, 29 November 1915 to 17 January 1916; DA and QMG, 10th Army Corps, Mediterranean Expeditionary Force, 18 January to 27 March 1916; Inspector-General of Communications, Indian Expeditionary Force 'D', Mesopotamian Expeditionary Force, 16 April 1916.  He served in Burma, 1892, during the operations of Irrawaddy Column; at the defence of Sadon (slightly wounded; horse wounded; mentioned in Despatches; Medal with clasp).  He was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 1 November 1892]: "George Fletcher MacMunn, Lieutenant, Royal Artillery.  For services during the recent operations in connection with the defence of Sadon".  He served in Burma, 1893, during the operations in Kachin Hills (clasp); took part in the operations on North-West Frontier of India, 1897-98, during the operations on the Samana and in the Kurram Valley, with Jaypur Transport Corps as Staff Officer; also with Tirah Expeditionary Force, in command of a mountain battery (Medal with three clasps); served in the South African War, 1899-1902, on Staff; took part in the advance on Kimberley; took part in the operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900; in the Transvaal in May and June 1900; in the Transvaal, west of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900; in Orange River Colony, May to 29 November 1900; also in Cape Colony, north of Orange River; again in the Transvaal, March to April 1901,and April to 31 May 1902; in Orange River Colony, December 1900, and April 1901, to April 1902; also during the operations in Cape Colony, December 1900 to March 1901 (Despatches [London Gazette, 7 May and 10 September 1901]; Brevet of Major 29 November 1900; Queen's Medal with three clasps, and King's Medal with two clasps); placed on the list of Officers considered qualified for Staff employment, in consequence of services on the Staff in the field.  He was given the Brevet of Lieutenant Colonel 10 May 1913.  For his services in the European War at the Dardanelles and in Mesopotamia, 1914-18, he was 12 times mentioned in Despatches; was given the Brevet of Colonel 1 April 1915; promoted to Major General; created a CB in 1916; a CSI in 1918; a KCB in 1917, and a KCSI in 1919; was made Officier, Legion of Honour.  Sir G F MacMunn published ‘The Armies of India', in 1911; ‘Pike and Carronade', in 1912; ‘A Free Lance in Kashmir: A Tale of the Great Anarchy', in 1914.  He married, in 1893, Alice Emily, eldest daughter of Colonel J R Watson, ISC, and they had one son and one daughter.
[KCB], [KCSI], DSO s/g, IGS 54 (2) Burma 1889-92, Chin Hills 1892-93 (Lieut G F Macmunn, No 6 Bo Mt By), IGS 95 (3) Punjab Frontier 1897-98, Samana 1897, Tirah 1897-98 (Lieutt G F MacMunn, No 1 Kashmir Mn By.), QSA (3) CC OFS Tr (Major G F MacMunn, DSO RFA), KSA (2) 01 02 (Major G F MacMunn, DSO RFA), 1914-15 Star (Bt Col G F Macmunn, DSO), BWM, VM & MID (Maj Gen Sir G F MacMunn), GSM (1) Kurdistan (Maj Gen Sir G F MacMunn), DM, 1911 Delhi Durbar, 1935 Jubilee.  Royal Artillery Institution, silver prize medal, 47mm (Lieut G F MacMunn, DSO, RA).  The King's Medal, Royal Society of Arts, Manufacture and Commerce, GVR, silver, 55mm (Lieut-General Sir G F MacMunn, KCB, KCSI, DSO, for the Sir George Birdwood memorial Lecture “The Romance of the Martial Races of India”. Session 1931-32) contained in its fitted presentation case.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Artillery
MaconchyErnest William Stuart KingLieutenantMACONCHY, ERNEST WILLIAM STUART KING, Lieutenant, was born 18 June, I860, son of George Maconchy, of Rathmore, County Longford, and Louisa, daughter of Solomon Richards, of Ardamine, County Wexford: entered the Army, 1882; served with the Hazara Expedition, 1888 (Medal with clasp): He served in Hazara, 1891 (wounded, Despatches, clasp, DSO).  The following is an entry from the Despatches on the Hazara Expedition, 1891: Despatch by Major General W K Elles, CB: "I now beg to bring to the notice of His Excellency the good service of Lieutenant Maconchy, who arrived on the scene at a critical moment and was himself wounded".  (GGO No 816, paragraph 6; dated 28 August 1891.) This is part of the account of the action at Ghazikot, when Lieutenant Maconchy's detachment of 60 men was charged at night by 400 fanatics.  Lieutenant Maconchy was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 November 1891]: "In recognition of services during the late Hazara Expedition.  Ernest William Stuart King Maconchy, Lieutenant, Indian Staff Corps".  Insignia sent to the C-in-C in India; Presented 6 May 1892.  Served Isizai Expedition, 1892: Chitral Relief Force, 1895 (Medal with clasp).  Captain Maconchy married, 1895, Caroline Agnes, daughter of Alexander H Campbell, JP, DL, of 8 Cornwall Gardens, London, and they had one son and one daughter.  He served on the North-West Frontier of India, 1897-98 (Despatches, Brevet of Major, 1898, three clasps).  He served in Waziristan in 1901 (clasp).  In the Waziristan Expedition, 1901, the following telegram was received by the GOC: Telegram from Adjutant-General in India, No 5280A of 31 December 1901: "Ths C-in-C has heard with much satisfaction of the gallant behaviour of Major Maconchy, DSO and ——, who, by their promptness at a trying moment probably saved much loss of life".  Major, 1901; AQMG, Intelligence, India, 1903; Lieutenant Colonel, 1904; commanding 51st Sikhs, Frontier Force, 1904; Secretary, Government of India, Department of Military Supply, 1906-9; Colonel, 11 June 1907; Deputy Secretary, Army Department, Government of India, 1909-12; created a CIE 1909; created a CB 1911; retired 28 January 1914; commanding 178th Brigade, Sherwood Foresters, 1915.  Brigadier General E W S K Maconchy was created a CMG in 1917.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Indian Staff Corps
MacquoidCharles Edward Every Francis KLieutenantMACQUOID, CHARLES EDWARD EVERY FRANCIS KIRWAN, Lieutenant, was born 2 August 1869, eldest son of Colonel R K Macquoid and Frances Every, daughter of General Alfred Cooper.  He was educated at Dover College; joined the King's (Liverpool) Regiment 11 February 1888; became Lieutenant, Indian Staff Corps, 26 August 1888, and Lieutenant, 3rd Infantry, and exchanged into the 20th Deccan Horse in 1891.  Employed on Special Service, North-East Frontier of Burma, 1895—96, for which he received the thanks of the Commander-in-Chief in India and the local Government of Burma.  He served on the North-West Frontier of India, 1897-98, in the Mohmand Expedition, as Field Intelligence Officer (September to October 1897); was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 11 January 1898].  He took part in the operations on the Samana and in the Kurram Valley during August and September 1897, and received the Medal and one clasp.  He served in the Tirah Campaign of 1897-98 as Field Intelligence Officer, 1st Division (10 October 1897 to April 1898).  He was present at the capture of the Arhanga and Sampagha Passes.  Reconnaissance of the Saran Sar and action of 9 November 1897.  Operations against the Khani Khel Chamkanis.  Operations in the Bazar Valley 25 to 30 December 1897.  He received a clasp, was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 5 April 1898], and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 20 May 1898]: "Charles Edward Every Francis Kirwan Macquoid, Lieutenant, Indian Staff Corps.  In recognition of services during the recent operations on the North-West Frontier of India".  The Insignia were sent to the Commander-in-Chief in India, and presented on 31 August 1898, at Rangoon, by the Brigadier General Commanding the Rangoon District.  He became Captain, Indian Army, 11 February 1899.  In 1900 and 1901 he served in South Africa, and received the Queen's Medal and clasp.  On 11 February 1906, he was promoted to Major, and in 1912 he was transferred from the 20th Deccan Horse into the 4th Cavalry, Indian Army, as Second-in-Command.  He became Lieutenant Colonel 11 February 1914.  He served in the European War, in France and Mesopotamia from October 1914 to 1916 (Mons Star).  AAG, GHQ, Mesopotamia (mentioned in Despatches).  Promoted Brigadier General, 1918.  GOC Kuki punitive measures, September 1918 to May 1919.  GOC 46th Brigade, Afghan War, May 1919.  Brigadier General Macquoid's favourite recreations were shooting and polo.  He was the author of 'Strategy illustrated by British Campaigns', with preface by Field-Marshal Lord Roberts.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Indian Staff Corps
MaddenGeorge ColquhounMajorMADDEN, GEORGE COLQUHOUN, Major, was born 9 February 1856, at, Brighton, son of Henry Riderwood Madden, MP, and Helen Madden (nee Cowan).  He won the Dux Medal while a boy at school in Edinburgh.  Entered the Army in 1875; was promoted Captain in 1877; served against the Jebus and Sofas, West Coast of Africa, 1892.  "During the attack on the town of Toniataba, Major G C Madden, West India Regiment, who was in command of the troops, was superintending a party of twelve men who were endeavouring with a heavy beam to break down the south gate of the town, when suddenly a number of musket muzzles were projected through a double row of loopholes which had been masked.  Some of these were within two or three yards of that officer's back, and before he realized what had happened, Lance Corporal Gordon threw himself between Major Madden and the muskets, pushing that officer out of the way, and exclaiming, ‘Look out, sir!‘  At the same moment Lance Corporal Gordon was shot through the lungs.  By his bravery and self-devotion on this occasion, the Lance Corporal probably saved the life of his commanding officer".  The above is the description (taken from the London Gazette of 9 December 1892) of how Lance Corporal W J Gordon (the first coloured man to be given the Victoria Cross) won his decoration.  In the same year Major Madden accompanied the Expedition against the Jebus, Lagos, when he was mentioned in Despatches, received the Medal and clasp, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette 30 September 1892]: "For his services during the recent operations against the Jebus.  George Colquhoun Madden, Major, West India Regiment".  Presentation by the Governor of Sierra Leone 2 January 1903.  Two years later there was another expedition to the Gambia, against Fodey Silah, when Major Madden was again mentioned in Despatches, received a clasp, and was created a CB.  Lieutenant Colonel Madden was placed on half-pay in 1895, and three years later retired from the Army.  He was an athlete and won several cups for running and jumping.  He died at 51, Gunterstone Road, West Kensington, London on 20 April 1912.
CB, DSO, E&W Africa (2) 1892 1893-94.  Glendining Dec 89.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
West India Regiment
MahonBryan ThomasCaptainMAHON, BRYAN THOMAS, Captain, was born 2 April 1862, son of Henry Blake Mahon, of Belleville, County Galway, and Matilda, daughter of Colonel Seymour, of Ballymore Castle, County Galway.  He was educated privately, and gazetted to the 21st Hussars 27 January 1883, and transferred to the 8th Hussars 14 February 1883, serving continuously in this regiment, until he joined the Egyptian Army.  He served in India until 1889; became Captain 19 April 1888, and was Adjutant, 8th Hussars, 31 May 1890 to 19 January 1893.  He was employed with the Egyptian Army 20 January 1893 to 24 January 1900; served in the Expedition to Dongola in 1896, as Staff Officer, Cavalry Brigade, taking part in the operations of 7 June and 19 September.  He was mentioned in Despatches 3 November 1895; received the Egyptian Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 17 November 1896]: "Bryan Thomas Mahon, Captain, 8th Hussars.  In recognition of services in the recent operations in Egypt and the Sudan".  (Insignia presented 25 January 1897.) He served in the Nile Expedition in 1897 (clasp to Egyptian Medal, 4th Class Osmanieh), and in the Nile Expedition in 1898, being present, at the battles of the Atbara and Khartoum; was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 30 September 1898]; received the Brevet of Lieutenant Colonel 14 November 1898; two clasps to the Egyptian Medal; Relief of Gedaref; clasp to the Egyptian Medal; served in the Nile Expedition, 1899; operations resulting in the final defeat of the Khalifa.  As AAG, Flying Column, and in charge of the Intelligence Department; actions at Abu Aadel and Om Dubreikat (Despatches [London Gazette, 30 January 1900]; Brevet of Colonel 14 March 1900; two clasps to Egyptian Medal).  He served in the South African War 1899-1900, as Special Service Officer, afterwards on the Staff (including services as Brigadier General, Cavalry Brigade).  He commanded the Mafeking Relief Force in May 1900.  After describing the state of affairs in Mafeking.  Sir A Conan Doyle says, on pages 315-317 of ‘The Great Boer War': "So in a small blaze of glory ended the historic siege of Mafeking, for Eloff's attack was the last, though by no means the worst, of the trials which the garrison had to face.  Six killed and ten wounded were the British losses in this admirably managed affair.  On 17 May five days after the fight, the relieving force arrived, the besiegers were scattered, and the long-imprisoned garrison were free men once more.  Many who had looked at their maps and saw this post, isolated in the very heart of Africa had despaired of ever reaching their heroic fellow-countrymen; and now one universal outbreak of joybells and bonfires from Toronto to Melbourne proclaimed that there is no spot so inaccessible that the long arm of the Empire cannot reach it when her children are in peril.  Colonel Mahon, a young Irish officer who had made his reputation as a cavalry leader in Egypt, had started early in May from Kimberley with a small but mobile force consisting of the Imperial Light Horse (brought round from Natal for the purpose), the Kimberley Mounted Corps, the Diamond Fields Horse, some Imperial Yeomanry, a detachment of the Cape Police, and 100 volunteers from the Fusilier Brigade, with M Battery, RHA, and pom-poms —twelve hundred men in all.  Whilst Hunter was fighting his action at Rooidam on 4 May Mahon with his men struck round the western flank of the Boers and moved rapidly to the northward.  On 11 May they had left Vryburg, the halfway house, behind them, having done one hundred and twenty miles in five days.  They pushed on, encountering no opposition save that of nature, though they knew that they were being closely watched by the enemy.  At Koodoosrand it was found that a Boer force was in position in front, but Mahon avoided them by turning somewhat to the westward.  His detour took him, however, into a bushy country, and here the enemy headed him off, opening fire at short range upon the ubiquitous Imperial Light Horse, who led the column.  A short engagement ensued, in which the casualties amounted to thirty killed and wounded, but which ended in the defeat and dispersal of the Boers, whose force was certainly very much weaker than the British.  On 15 May the relieving column arrived without further opposition at Masibi Stadt, twenty miles to the west of Mafeking.  In the meantime Plumer's force upon the north had been strengthened by the addition of C Battery of four 12-pounder guns of the Canadian Artillery under Major Eudon and a body of Queenslanders.  These forces had been part of the small army which had come with General Carrington through Beira, and after a detour of thousands of miles, through their own wonderful energy they had arrived in time to form portion of the relieving column.  Foreign military critics, whose experience of warfare is to move troops across a frontier, should think of what the Empire has to do before her men go into battle.  These contingents had been assembled by long railway journeys, conveyed across thousands of miles of ocean to Cape Town, brought round another two thousand or so to Beira, transferred by a narrow-gauge railway to Bamboo Creek, changed to a broader gauge to Marandellas, sent on in coaches for hundreds of miles to Bulawayo, transferred to trains for another four or five hundred miles to Ootsi, and had finally a forced inarch of a hundred miles, which brought them up a few hours before their presence was urgently needed upon the field.  Their advance, which averaged twenty-five miles a day on foot for four consecutive days over deplorable roads, was one of the finest performances of the war.  With these high-spirited reinforcements and with his own hardy Rhodesians Plumer pushed on, and the two columns reached the hamlet of Masibi Stadt within an hour of each other.  Their united strength was far superior to anything which Snyman's force could place against them.  But the gallant and tenacious Boers would not abandon their prey without a last effort.  As the little army advanced upon Mafeking they found the enemy waiting in a strong position.  For some hours the Boers gallantly held their ground, and their artillery fire was, as usual, most accurate.  But our own guns were more numerous and equally well served, and the position was soon made untenable.  The Boers retired past Mafeking and took refuge in the trenches upon the eastern side: but Baden-Powell with his war-hardened garrison sallied out, and, supported by the artillery fire of the relieving column, drove them from their shelter.  With their usual admirable tactics their larger guns had been removed, but one small cannon was secured as a souvenir by the townsfolk, together with a number of wagons and a considerable quantity of supplies.  A long rolling trail of dust upon the eastern horizon told that the famous siege of Mafeking had at last come to an end".  Colonel Mahon was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 9 February and 16 April 1901], received the Queen's Medal with three clasps, and was created a CB.  He was Military Governor, Kordofan from 1901 to 1904; became Colonel 12 April 1904; commanded a 2nd Class District in India 12 April 1904 to 11 April 1908; became Major General 1 December 1908, commanded a Division in India 16 August 1909 to 15 August 1913; was created a KCVO in 1911, and promoted to Lieutenant General 4 September 1912.  He served in the European War from 1914; was GOC, 10th (Irish) Division, New Armies, and 10th Division, Mediterranean Expeditionary Force, 24 August 1914 to 27 October 1915.  He was Commander-in-Chief, Salonika Army, 28 October 1915 to 9 May 1916, and Commander-in-Chief in Ireland 15 November 1916 to June 1918.  Sir Bryan Mahon served in the BEF, France, from September 1918 to April 1919.  He was appointed Colonel, 8th Hussars, 7 March 1910; was a KCB, and was made a Privy Councillor, Ireland, in 1917.  His favourite recreations were shooting, hunting, polo and pig-sticking and steeple-chase riding.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
8th (The King's Royal Irish) Hussars
MalcolmNeillLieutenantMALCOLM, NEILL, Lieutenant, was born 8 October 1869, second son of Colonel Edward Douglas Malcolm, of Poltallock, CB, RE, JP, Deputy Lieutenant for the County of Argyll, and of Isabella Wyld, daughter of John Brown.  He was educated at Eton, and entered Princess Louise's Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders 20 February 1889, becoming Lieutenant 23 August 1893.  He served on the North-West Frontier of India, 1897-98 (Medal and clasp).  He was employed in the Uganda Protectorate 5 October 1897 to 25 October 1899, and conducted operations in the Shuli country, taking part in several engagements; was mentioned in Despatches, received the Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 24 January 1899]: "Neill Malcolm, Lieutenant, Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders.  In recognition of services during the recent operations in Uganda".  He was promoted to Captain 21 December 1898 and from 1899 to 1900 served in the South African War as Special Service Officer, and was present in operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900, including operations at Paardeberg 17 to 26 February (severely wounded 18 February).  He received the Queen's Medal with two clasps.  Captain Malcolm was on Special Service with the Somaliland Field Force 25 September 1903 to 18 June 1904; took part in the operations in Somaliland; was present at the action of Jidballi and received the Medal with two clasps.  He was Staff Captain, Headquarters of Army, 22 August 1904 to 31 December 1905; accompanied the British Mission to Fez, 1905; was DAQMG, Headquarters of Army, 1 January 1906 to 31 March 1908; Secretary, Historical Section, Committee of Imperial Defence, 1 April 1908 to 30 September 1910; was given the Brevet of Major 18 December 1909, and became Major 20 August 1910; was GSO2, Staff College, 22 January 1912 to 4 August 1914.  Major Malcolm served in the European War from 1914; as GSO2, 1st Army, BEF, 5 August 1914 to 31 October 1914; as GSO1,11th Division, Mediterranean Expeditionary Force, 1 November 1914 to 28 September 1915; was given the Brevet of Lieutenant Colonel 18 February 1915, He was GSO1, Salonika Army, Mediterranean Expeditionary Force, 29 September 1915 to 17 November 1915; was Brigadier General, General Staff, Mediterranean Expeditionary Force; Egyptian Expeditionary Force 18 November 1915 to 4 April 1916.  He was given the Brevet of Colonel 1 January 1916.  He was Brigadier General, General Staff, Reserve Corps, British Armies in France, 14 April to 6 July 1916; was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel 13 May 1916; Major General, General Staff, Reserve Army, 5th Army, British Armies in France, 7 July 1916 to 21 December 1917; promoted to Major General 1 January 1917; commanded 66th Division, British Armies in France, December 1917, till wounded 29 March 1918; and 59th Division 8 September to 26 December 1918; commanded 30th Division 27 December 1918 to 5 February 1919.  Major General N Malcolm was mentioned in Despatches, created a CB, promoted to Brevet Lieutenant Colonel, Brevet Colonel and Major General; received the Order of the Nile, 3rd Class, 1916, and was made a Commander of the Legion of Honour.  He was FRGS; was Editor of 'The Science of War'.  He married, in 1907, Angela, only daughter of W R Malcolm, and they had two sons and one daughter. 
KCB, DSO, ISG 1895 (1) PF, Uganda (2), QSA (2) RofK Paar, AGS (2), 1914 Star, BWM, VM + MID, 1935 Jubilee.  Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders Museum, Edinburgh.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
(Princess Louise's) Sutherland and Argyll Highland
MalcolmPulteneyMajorMALCOLM, PULTENEY, Major, was born 16 August 1861, son of General Sir George Malcolm, GCB, Bombay Army.  He was educated at Summerfields, near Oxford; Burney's at Gosport; Wellington College and Sandhurst.  He entered the Army 11 August 1880, and joined the 2nd Battalion Royal Fusiliers, at Kandahar, Afghanistan; was promoted Lieutenant 1 July 1881.  In 1886 he was transferred to the Indian Army, and was posted to the 2nd Battalion 4th Goorkhas then being raised.  He received in 1887 the Albert Medal for attempting to save life on land.  He served in the Chin Lushai Expeditionary Force, 1889-90 (Medal with clasp); was promoted Captain 11 August 1891, and served with the Chitral Relief Force, 1895, being present at the storming of the Malakand Pass (Medal with clasp); in the North-West Frontier operations, 1897-98, as Provost-Marshal to the Relief Force, and subsequently as DAAG, 1st Brigade, for which he was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 11 February 1898] (clasp).  He became Major 11 August 1900; served as Chief Staff Officer, Malakand Field Force, 1900-1.  He served in Waziristan, 1901-2, as Officiating AAG, Derajat District, and Chief Staff Officer to General Sir L Dening, KCB, then in command of the district and of the operations in Waziristan.  He was mentioned in Despatches twice; received a clasp to the Medal, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 2 September 1902]: "Pulteney Malcolm, Major, Indian Staff Corps.  In recognition of services during the Mahsud-Waziri operations".  He was invested by King Edward VII on 18 February 1903.  Major Malcolm retired from the Indian Army 11 August 1904.  He was Head Constable of Kingston-on-Hull from 1904 to 1910 and was Chief Constable of Cheshire from 1910.  He was created an MVO in 1913, and became Temporary Colonel during the European War, while employed as AA and QMG on the Divisional Staff of the New Armies (mentioned in Despatches).  He was given the honorary rank of Lieutenant Colonel 29 May 1917.  Lieutenant Colonel Malcolm married, in 1888, Emily, eldest daughter of T Bowen.  Their only surviving child was Captain Pulteney Malcolm, who commanded the King's Company, Grenadier Guards—was killed in France on 25 August 1918.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Indian Staff Corps
ManselAlfredCaptainMANSEL, ALFRED, Captain, was born 5 February 1852, son of Captain W H Mansel; entered RA 12 September 1872; served in Naga Expeditionary Force, 1879-80, in command of RA; was present at the storming of Khonona (Despatches, Medal with clasp); Mahsud-Wuzeree Expedition, 1881, with Tank Column, and with Burma Expedition, 1886-7, in command of RA, and was present at the advance on Nyaungwe (Despatches, two clasps); created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 30 May 1891]: "Alfred Mansel, Captain, Royal Artillery".  Insignia presented in India; became Lieutenant Colonel, 15 July 1898; Brevet Colonel 15 July 1902; commanded Northern Section, RA, Plymouth; retired, with the rank of Colonel, 15 July 1903.  He died 7 July 1918.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Artillery
MarriottReginald AdamsCaptainMARRIOTT, REGINALD ADAMS, Captain and Brevet Major, was born in November 1857; joined the Royal Marine Artillery in October 1875.  He served on HMS Monarch, and during the French operations at Tunis was employed as Secretary to the Sfax Commission.  On the Institution of the Distinguished Service Order, Captain Marriott was selected specially for services rendered before the bombardment of Alexandria, when he inspected the Mex Forts in the guise of an Italian ship's stoker; for work in the Consulate at Alexandria before and during the massacre; and generally for the excellence of the training and special equipment of the Egyptian Camel Corps, which acted as Mounted Infantry for the River Column in the Gordon Relief Expedition.  Captain Marriott was of the first landing party directly after the bombardment, and his Order was given him partly for work done before that, so he could certainly claim to be one of the very first Companions of the Distinguished Service Order.  He afterwards served with the Royal Marine Battalion at Kassassin and Tel-el-Kebir, being mentioned in Despatches.  He joined the Egyptian Army from the day of its formation, and was first Drill and Musketry Instructor to the native recruits, and subsequently organized and commanded the Egyptian Camel Corps in the Nile Expedition, 1885-80.  Colonel Andrew Haggard describes on page 388 of 'Under Crescent and Star' how, "although Marriott and Smith-Dorrien, both Egyptians, pushed on with both the Egyptian and British Camel Corps and Mounted Infantry, and captured nine of the enemy's barges laden with arms and food, Abri was as far as the remainder of the troops went up the Nile.  In fact, the advance on Abri ended the campaign".  He was given the Brevet of Major 23 March 1886; was mentioned in Despatches, and created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 26 November 1886]: "Reginald Adams Marriott, Captain and Brevet Major, Royal Marine Artillery.  For the action at Ginniss".  The Insignia of the Order were presented to him by Queen Victoria on the first occasion of the Investiture of the Order 17 December 1886.  He was afterwards invited with others to breakfast at Osborne, where they signed their names in the Queen's birthday-book.  Captain Marriott, for his services in Egypt, also received the Medal with four clasps, the 4th Class Osmanieh and the 5th Class Medjidie.  He was in the Naval Intelligence Department for five years, from its formation in 1887.  After Major Marriott's retirement from the Royal Marine Artillery on 2 August 1891, he joined HM Prison Service, and has been Governor of Lincoln, Chelmsford and Lewes Prisons.  He was sent to the Intelligence Department of the Admiralty during the war.  He was an acknowledged linguist, and has written on natural science, championing General Drayson's discovery in astronomy, in ‘The Change of Climate and its Cause', ‘The Glacial Epoch Explained', and other pamphlets on geology and kindred subjects.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Marine Artillery
MartinJames HamiltonFleet SurgeonMARTIN, JAMES HAMILTON, Fleet Surgeon, Royal Navy, was born on 8 August 1841, at Truro, son of Hamilton Duckworth Martin and of Louisa Martin.  He was educated at Grammar School, Truro, and University College, London.  His record of services was as follows: Surgeon of HMS Nassau during encounters with Sulu pirates and present at destruction of Carang, 1872; Staff Surgeon in charge of Transports during Zulu War, 1879 (mentioned in Despatches; Zulu Medal and clasp); Staff Surgeon of Thalia, Egyptian War, 1882; Senior Medical Officer in charge of Transports (received thanks of the Admiralty; Egyptian Medal; Khedive's Bronze Star); Principal Medical Officer of Royal Marine Battalion in Eastern Soudan, 1884; present at Battles of El Teb and Tamaai (mentioned in Despatches; wounded; promoted to Fleet Surgeon for these services; Suakin and El Teb-Tamaai clasps); served in HMS Boadicea, Flag as PMO, in Naval Brigade under the command of Vice Admiral Honourable Sir E R Fremantle, KCB, CMG, Commander-in-Chief on East Indies Station, for the punitive expedition against the Sultan of Witu in East Africa, October 1890 (mentioned in Despatches; DSO for this service; General Africa Medal; Witu 1890 clasp).  His appointment to the Distinguished Service Order was gazetted 2 January 1891: "In recognition of services during  operations against the Sultanate of Witu.  James Hamilton Martin, Fleet Surgeon, Royal Navy".  He was promoted to Inspector-General, 1 January 1900.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Navy
MartinJames McCardieStaff SurgeonMARTIN, JAMES McCARDIE, Surgeon, Royal Navy, was born in 1859, at Camus House, Coleraine, third son of the Reverend John F Martin and Mrs Martin.  He was educated at the Academical Institution, Coleraine, and at Edinburgh University, and entered the Royal Navy in 1882.  He served with the Royal Marine Battalion in the Benin Expedition as Senior Medical Officer of the Flying Column to Benin City.  He was mentioned in Despatches, received the Medal and clasp, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 25 May 1897]: "James McCardie Martin, Staff Surgeon, Royal Navy.  In recognition of services during the recent Expedition to Benin".  He was Senior Medical Officer, HMS Barfleur, Flagship of Sir James Bruce, KCMG, at Yaku, during the Pekin Relief Expedition, 1900.  He became Deputy Inspector-General, RN, and has retired.  His favourite recreations were hunting, shooting and golf.  He married, in 1899, Edith Lambert, daughter of Henry Matier, of Dunlambert, Belfast. 
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Navy
MartyrCyril GodfreyMajorMARTYR, CYRIL GODFREY, Major, was born 5 August 1850, son of Joseph Martyr, of Stoke Fleming, Devon, and Mrs Joseph Martyr.  He was gazetted to the Duke of Cornwall's Light Infantry, 23 October 1880, and became Lieutenant, 1 July 1881.  He was employed with the Egyptian Army 24 February 1886 to 23 February 1896, and served in the Egyptian War of 1882, including the reconnaissance in force on Kafr Dowar, actions at El Magfar and Tel-el-Mahuta, both actions at Kassassin, battle of Tel-el-Kebir (Medal with clasp and Khedive's Star).  He again saw active service in the Sudan Expedition of 1884-85, on the Nile, with Mounted Infantry, and was present at both actions at Abu Klea, actions at Gubat and Metammeh.  attack on convoy 14 February (two clasps).  He became Captain 14 August 1889.  In the Sudan in 1888-91 he was present at the action of Gemaizah (clasp; 4th Class Medjidie); and at the action of Toski (clasp).  For his services at the capture of Tokar in February 1891, he received the 4th Class Osmanieh and the clasp to the Bronze Star.  He was promoted to Major 26 February 1890.  He served in the Expedition to Dongola in 1895, as AAG, Headquarters Staff, and took part in the operations of 7 June and 19 September.  He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 3 November 1895], received the Egyptian Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 17 November 1895]: "Cyril Godfrey Martyr, Major, The Duke of Cornwall's Light Infantry.  In recognition of services in the recent operations in the Sudan".  The Insignia were presented to him by Her Majesty the Queen 20 February 1897.  He commanded the Expedition which resulted in the capture of the Sudanese Forts near Mruli and in action at Jeruba.  He was mentioned in Despatches, was given the Brevet of Lieutenant Colonel 25 January 1899, and received the Medal and clasp.  In Uganda in 1899 he took part in the operations against the Kabarega (clasp).  He served in the South African War from 1899 to 1900, as Special Service Officer, also Commanding a Corps of Mounted Infantry.  He took part in the operations in Natal in 1899 for the Relief of Ladysmith.  Relief of Kimberley.  Operations in the Orange Free State February to May 1900, including operations at Paardeberg 17 to 26 February; actions at Poplar Grove and Driefontein, Vet River (5 and 6 May) and Zand River.  Operations in the Transvaal in May and June 1900, including actions near Johannesburg, Pretoria and Diamond Hill (11 and 12 June).  Operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, July to September 1900, including actions at Reit Vlei and Belfast (27 August).  Operations in Cape Colony, south of Orange River, 1900.  He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 8 February 1901], and received the Queen's Medal and seven clasps.  During the European War Lieutenant Colonel Martyr was employed as General Stall Officer from 3 August 1914 to 3 August 1916.  He married, in 1901, Emma Maud, daughter of  W J Bellville and Mrs Bellville, of 22 Berkeley Square, London, and they had two sons: Alan Godfrey Martyr and Peter Denys Martyr, and a daughter, Marjorie Bellville Martyr.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Duke of Cornwall's Light Infantry
MasonAlexander HerbertCaptainMASON, ALEXANDER HERBERT, Captain, was born in 1856, son of Martin Mason; entered the RE 1874; served during Afghan War, 1878-9-80 (Medal); with Nile Expedition, 1884-85, and in the operations on the Upper Nile in 1885-86 (Medal and Khedive's Star); with Hazara Expedition, 1888, as DAQMG for Intelligence (Despatches, Medal with clasp); with Zhob Field Force, 1890, under Sir George White, as DAQMG for Intelligence (Despatches, clasp).  He served with the second Miranzai Expedition in 1891; was mentioned in Despatches and received a clasp, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 November 1891]: "In recognition of services during  Zhob and Hazara Expeditions.  Alexander Herbert Mason, Captain, Royal Engineers".  Insignia presented at Chatham by Lieutenant General Grant, 18 May 1892.  Captain Mason served with the Isazai Expedition, 1892, as DAQMG (Intelligence); was present at the action at Wana, 1894 (Despatches, created a CB 1895, clasp).  Captain Mason married, 1893, Eva, daughter of General Sir Robert Biddulph, CB, GCMG.  Lieutenant Colonel Mason died 8 May 1896.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Engineers
MathewCharles MassyCaptainMATHEW, CHARLES MASSY, Captain, was born at Wexford 16 May 1866, eldest son of Surgeon-Major C B Mathew and Mary, daughter of Captain J M'Call, 4th Dragoon Guards.  He was educated at a private school, and at Portsmouth Grammar School, and joined the 2nd Durham Light Infantry 23 August 1884.  He served in the Sudan, 1885-86, with the Frontier Field Force, being present at the action of Ginniss (Medal and Bronze Star).  He became Captain, Durham Light Infantry, 11 April 1894; was transferred to the Army Ordnance Corps, and was Adjutant, AO Corps, 3 July 1899 to 7 September 1903.  He served in the Ashanti Expedition, 1895-96 (Star).  In 1896 he served in the Expedition to Dongola, being present at the action of Hafir; was mentioned in Despatches 3 November 1896, and received the Egyptian Medal with clasp.  He served in the Nile Expedition of 1898, and was present at the Battle of Khartoum.  He was mentioned in Despatches 30 September 1898; received the Medal and clasp, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 15 November 1898]: "Charles Massy Mathew, Captain, The Durham Light Infantry.  In recognition of services during the recent operations in the Sudan, including the Battle of Khartoum".  The Insignia were sent to the GOC, Egypt, and presented at a full-dress parade of the Cairo Garrison.  He served in the South African War, 1899-1901, and was present at the operations in Orange River Colony, February to July 1901; operations in Cape Colony, February July and August 1901.  He received the Queen's Medal and three clasps.  He became Major 1 February 1904; Lieutenant-Colonel 19 January 1905, and Colonel 26 November 1910.  In 1910 he became Chief Ordnance Officer, Southern Command, and he was created a CB in 1911.  He was Assistant Director of Ordnance Stores, Southern Command.  He served in the European War from 1914; was mentioned in Despatches twice, and created a CMG On 17 August 1917, Colonel Mathew was appointed Principal Ordnance Officer (temporary), and he was promoted to Major General 17 August 1917, and created a KCMG.  Sir Charles Mathew married, in 1911, Janet, second daughter of Sir James Knox, and they had two daughters.  His favourite recreations were shooting, golf and lawn tennis.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Durham Light Infantry
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