The DSO was instituted in 1886 and used the VRI cyper for issues up to an just after the death of Queen Victoria.  Listed here are all the DSOs awarded with the VRI cypher except this issued for the Boer War which can be found here.

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(456 Records)

 Surname   Forename   Rank   Notes   Unit 
BrethertonGeorge HowardCaptainHe was born at Gloucester 6 March, I860, son of Edward Bretherton, of Clifton, Bristol, and S Georgiana, daughter of W Barton Price. He was educated privately, and joined the Royal Irish Regiment 29 July 1882, from the Militia, and the ISC 18 September 1883; served in the Queen's Own Corps of Guides, 1884-87, becoming Lieutenant 15 February 1884; served with the First and Second Miranzai Expeditions, 1891; was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 15 September 1891], and received the Medal and clasp; was on special duty at Gilgit, 1893-97 (services acknowledged by Government), he became Captain 29 July 1893. Captain Bretherton served in the Chitral Campaign in 1895, being present at the investment of the Fort at Mastuj. He was mentioned in Despatches; received Medal with clasp, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 21 January 1896]: "George Howard Bretherton, Captain, Indian Staff Corps. In recognition of services during the operations of the Chitral Relief Force". The Insignia were presented 14 April 1886. The Decoration was awarded for his services during the investment of Mastuj Fort by Chitralis. He took part in the operations on the North-West Frontier of India, 1897-98, with the Tirah Expeditionary Force as Brigade Commissariat. Officer, Peshawar Column (Despatches [London Gazette, 5 April 1898]; two clasps). From 1897 Major Bretherton was on special duty with the Supply Transport Corps in Kashmir. He married Katherine Murray, eldest daughter of Major General H P Campbell, ISC. He was a Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society, and his favourite recreations were shooting, riding and fishing. Major Bretherton was drowned 25 July 1904.
DSO, IGS 1854 (1) Samana 1891 (Lt SC), IGS 1895 (3) RofC PF Tirah (Capt Com Dept), Tibet Medal (1) Gyantse (Maj S&T Corps), 1903 Delhi Durbar. Glendining Nov 2000. Estimate £2.5-3k.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Indian Staff Corps
BrindleRobertReverendHe was born in Liverpool 4 November 1837. He studied for twelve years at the English College at Lisbon; was ordained Deacon, and became Priest in 1862. He worked on the Missions at Plymonth for some twelve years, and became Military Chaplain in 1874, his first experience being at Woolwich. Thence he passed to Halifax, Nova Scotia, for live years and on his return served for a short time at Aldershot. In 1882 came the campaign against Arabi Pasha, and for four years he saw constant active service in Egypt. Of the landing of the troops the Bishop was wont to give a very lively description. The scene of hopeless confusion in the unloading of the transports at Ishmailia, the horses swimming from the ships on to the shore, the men encumbered with all manner of military stores and equipments, he would relate in an amusing manner—adding the remark of one of the British Tars who said that he had hitherto considered himself as one of Her Majesty's seamen, but had now been turned into a commissariat mule! He was continually with the fighting line. He was present at a great many battles, in which he shared the risks of the combatants. Speaking to the students at Lisbon College in 1909, His Lordship frankly admitted that in the first engagement with the enemy, when the English lost about a hundred men, he felt anything but comfortable, and called himself a fool for having left congenial work in England to go out to a desert place where he thought he would certainly be shot. Such, however, was not to be, and in future, when under fire, he experienced no such fear, although he had some narrow escapes. He was not present at the Battle of Tel-el-Kebir, being stricken down with cholera just previously. While he was in Cairo he worked among the numerous cases of enteric fever. One who was with him says that, he cheered all by his companionship, and was never downhearted. He was always in the best of spirits, and was always most popular with the soldiers. In the Nile Expedition of 1884, he captained one of the boats of the Royal Irish Regiment — the regiment which won the prize of £10 offered by Lord Wolseley to the first boat to reach the end of the river journey. Field-Marshal Sir Evelyn Wood says: "I was riding up the banks of the Nile on a camel, and he was pulling in a boat of the Royal Irish Regiment. About sundown on Christmas Day I saw a little flotilla of boats flying the Royal Irish flag toiling up the river. Father Brindle got out when he had pulled up to us, hot, tired and irritable, with his hands blistered and the perspiration running down his face. Said I: 'Father, what have you been doing?' 'Pulling stroke in order to encourage them.' 'Any result?' I asked. What he really said was 'Devil a bit'. But I interpreted it, to the clerics, 'No, none at all'. The Father was, however, unduly pessimistic, for the Royal Irish won Lord Wolseley's prize, given to the battalion which made the best time for the three or four hundred miles up the river, and also which, brought up in good order the largest amount of public stores intact". This incident occurred on Christmas Day, 1884, during the Gordon Relief Expedition, and is related by Field-Marshal Sir E Wood, VC, in 'Winnowed Memories'. A Protestant friend of Dr Brindle's, a doctor attached to the Expedition, relates how, after the Battle of Metemmeh, "the Royal Irish were ordered across the desert to assist in the return of the force. Lord Wolseley was aware that to send the regiment without Father Brindle was out, of the question, and so he accompanied the regiment, and was provided with a camel for the hundreds of miles of the march. But Father Brindle did not use the camel, and did the whole desert journey to Metemmeh and back on foot. I went out a few miles, from Korti, to meet the returning force, and found the Father inarching with the regiment, but, the soles of his boots were gone, and rags rolled about, his feet had replaced them. According to my experience, everyone that met him appreciated him. He was a wonderful man for making friends, and Lord Wolseley had a very high opinion of him". After being present, at the Battle of Ginniss, he returned to England, and for the next ten years served as Chaplain at, Colchester and Aldershot. During this period of his life, says his friend, the Very Reverend Canon Vere, "I saw him from time to time, and was his guest at Aldershot. In the thirty-fifth year of his priesthood, and Hearing the fifty-ninth year of his age, Father Brindle again set sail for Egypt, and, in 1896, was attached to Lord Kitchener's Expedition to Dongola. During the long and trying period of inaction at Sarras, the soldier-Chaplain distinguished himself by his devotion to the sick. He was, when cholera invaded the camp, tireless in his ministration to the troops, who were always cheered by his undaunted spirit". Mr R Caton Woodville, in his 'Random Recollections', speaks of Father Brindle thus: "All the Tommies loved him when he was Army Chaplain. It was he who carried the Tommies out, of their quarters in his arms, placed them in the ambulance to convey them to the hospital when nobody else would come near them, as the cholera was raging and the men were dying like flies, and even many of the doctors themselves had died. When I asked him how it was that he never caught it himself, he replied that he never ate anything that was not freshly cooked. It was during the halt at Atbara that Father Brindle performed a very heroic deed. It was a Saturday night, and word came from another camp some nine miles away that a Catholic soldier was dying. Unarmed, he set out at once, and walked across the El Teb, which was infested by the enemy. He administered the last rites to the dying man, and stayed with him to the end. He then tramped back without rest or food, and reached the camp in time to say Mass for his men on Sunday morning". On Good Friday, the 8th of April, Father Brindle was present at the Battle of the Atbara, which wiped out the finest Dervish Army that had opposed the British. In the three great attacks of the Battle of Omdurman, the heroic priest was in the fighting line. At the Memorial Service for General Gordon, held in Khartoum, Father Brindle was one of the officiating Chaplains, and composed a prayer which he recited on that occasion, and which by Lord Kitchener's orders was printed for distribution. G W Steevens says, on page 314 of his book 'With Kitchener to Khartoum': "Next fell a deeper hush than ever, except for the solemn minute guns that had followed the fierce salute. Four Chaplains—Catholic, Anglican, Presbyterian and Methodist—came slowly forward and ranged themselves with their backs to the palace, just before the Sirdar. The Presbyterian read the fifteenth Psalm, the Anglican led the rustling whisper of the Lord's Prayer. Snow-haired Father Brindle, best beloved of Priests, laid his helmet at his feet and read a memorial prayer bareheaded in the sun". Father Brindle was five times mentioned in Despatches, and received rapid promotion. For the Nile Expedition of 1884, he received the British War Medal with four clasps, and for the Khartoum Expedition the Medal with three clasps. He was given a Good Service Pension, and received the Turkish Orders of the Medjidie with three clasps, the Osmanieh with four clasps, and the Khedive's Bronze Star. He was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 15 November 1898]: "Reverend Robert Brindle, Chaplain to the Forces, 1st Class, in recognition of services in Egypt and the Sudan, including the battles of Atbara and Khartoum". The Insignia were sent to the General OC in Egypt, and presented by him 20 December 1898, at a full dress parade at the Cairo Garrison. Father Brindle had his decoration stolen from him in Rome, and obtained another at his own expense, and this was presented to him by Queen Victoria on 11 May 1899. He retired from the Army in 1899; journeyed from Egypt to Rome, and on 12 March 1899, was consecrated Titular Bishop of Hermopolis by Cardinal Satolli. After the death of Monsignor Barry, Bishop Brindle became Provost of the Westminster Chapter, aChaplain to the Forces
BromlowThomas D'ArcyFleet SurgeonBROMLOW, THOMAS D'ARCY, MD, Fleet Surgeon EN, served in Burma, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service 0rder [London Gazette, 21 June 1887]: "Thomas D'Arcy Bromlow, MD, Fleet Surgeon RN.  For operations in Burma".  He died 2 February 1892.
[DSO gold], Egypt (0) undated (Staff Surgeon HMS Turquoise), [IGS 1854 (1) Burma 1885-87], [Khedive Star].  Egypt only for all the following.  London Coin and Stamp Spring 83 £135.  Sotheby's Mar 86 £154.  Spink Nov 87 £225.  Spink Mar 88 £180.  DNW Dec 03 £310.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Navy
BromwichHerbertEngineer GeorgeBROMWICH, GEORGE HERBERT, Engineer, Royal Navy, was born on 27 November 1871, at Frome, Somerset, son of Edmund Cockey, MD, Surgeon. He was educated at Bloxham, Banbury, Oxford, and entered the Royal Navy in July 1887. In 1893 he assisted in the salvage operations at Ferrol, on board HMS Home, and he served on the Australian Station in HMS Karrakatta, 1894-7; at the Royal Naval College at Osborne; in the Goliath, the Good Hope, etc.  In 1900 he served in China, and was present at the Relief of Pekin, and Lean's Navy List says of his services in the campaign: "Promoted DSO for services in China, 1900. Mentioned in Despatches; landed with the Naval Brigade for the defence of Tientsin, and accompanied brigade during Admiral Seymour's attempted relief of Legations; employed in repairing and constructing temporary armoured trucks; did Company Officer's work with Royal Marines after Captain Beyts, RMA, was killed, and was left behind in the Tse-ku Arsenal, with Marines under Major Johnstone, as guard to the party left to destroy Arsenal. Employed mounting 4-inch guns of Algerine in Tientsin and near Pai Yang Arsenal; present at the taking of Native City of Tientsin". He received the Medal and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 9 November 1900]: "George Herbert Cockey, Engineer, Royal Navy. In recognition of services during the recent operations in China". (An additional entry says: "Name changed to Bromwich. Letter from the Admiralty dated 15 June 1912.") He was decorated for his services with the Royal Marines during Admiral Seymour's retreat to Tientsin, and for mounting 4-inch guns at Tientsin afterwards. The Insignia, Warrant and Statutes of the DSO were sent to the Admiralty, and the Insignia presented on 31 January 1901, by Rear Admiral Sir J A T Bruce, Second-in-Command on the China Station. Engineer-Commander Cockey changed his name to Bromwich by deed-poll in 1912. Captain Bromwich married, on 19 July 1909, at Portsmouth, Evelyn Mary Newton, daughter of Richard Newton, of Brisbane, Queensland, and their children were Frank Bromwich (born 9 July 1911), and Elizabeth Bromwich. Acting-Captain Bromwich became General Manager, Naval Yard, Garden Island, Sydney, in 1913.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Navy
BrookeRonald GeorgeCaptainBROOKE, RONALD GEORGE, Captain, was born 25 September 1866, second son of Sir Victor Brooke, 3rd Baronet, and Alice, daughter of Sir Alan Bellingham, 3rd Baronet.  He was educated at Marlborough, and Sandhurst; passed the Staff College; was gazetted to the 7th Hussars, 1886; was extra ADC to the Governor of Bombay; Orderly Officer to General Gatacre, commanding 3rd Brigade, Chitral Relief Force (mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 15 November 1895]; Medal with clasp); Orderly Officer to General Yeatman Biggs, commanding 2nd Division, Tirah Expeditionary Force, 1897 (two clasps); was ADC to General Gatacre during the Atbara and Khartoum Campaigns, 1898; received the Medal with two clasps, was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 24 May and 30 September 1898], and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 15 November 1898]: "Ronald George Brooke, Captain, 7th Hussars.  In recognition of services in Egypt and the Sudan, including the Battles of Atbara and Khartoum".  Insignia presented by the Queen at Windsor 1 December 1898.  He was also ADC to General Gatacre when the latter was commanding the Eastern District.  He served in the South African War, 1899-1902, as ADC on the Staff to Lieutenant General Sir George White, and DAAG to Elliot's Division from February 1902, and employed with the South African Light Horse.  He was present in the operations in Natal, 1899, including the action at Elandslaagte (severely wounded), and at the Defence of Ladysmith; operations in Orange River Colony, January to 31 May 1902; operations in Cape Colony, December 1901, to January 1902.  He was mentioned in Despatches by Sir George White 2 December 1899; by Sir Redvers Buller 19 June and 9 November 1900 [London Gazette, 8 February 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with seven clasps, the King's Medal with two clasps, and was given the Brevet of Major.  He served in East Africa from 1902 to 1904, in Somaliland, on the Staff, as DAAG, Lines of Communication, Obbia Force, from 16 January 1903.  He was mentioned in Despatches by Brigadier General Manning 17 August 1903, and Sir C Egerton 30 May 1904 [London Gazette, 2 September 1904]; received the Medal with two clasps, and was given the Brevet of Lieutenant Colonel 1 July 1904.  He retired 13 June 1908, with the rank of Colonel.  In the European War Colonel Brooke commanded the 12th Reserve Cavalry Regiment.  He was given a CBE in 1919.  He married in 1908, Haller, daughter of  Orville Horwitz, of Baltimore, Maryland, formerly wife of C A C Ponsonby, whom she divorced in 1907.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
7th (The Queen's Own) Hussars
BrowneArthur George FredericCaptainBROWNE, ARTHUR GEORGE FREDERIC, Captain, was born 21 June 1851, son of Colonel St John Thomas Browne, RA, and grandson of Lieutenant Colonel Arthur Browne, Lieutenant-Governor of Kinsale and Charles Fort (present as Lieutenant Fireworker of Artillery when Wolfe was fatally wounded at the heights of Abraham, 1759); was educated at Wellington College; entered the 44th Regiment in 1871 as Ensign; Bengal Staff Corps (now Indian Staff Corps), 1876; served during Afghan War of 1878-79 (Medal).  He married, 1882, Kate Fisher, daughter of Reverend J S Budden, and they had one son and four daughters.  He became Captain in 1883; served in Burma War of 1886 (Medal with clasp); with Lushai Expedition, 1889.  He was mentioned in Despatches; received clasp, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order, 14 November 1890: “Arthur George Frederic Browne, Captain, Bengal Staff Corps”.  His DSO was awarded “In recognition of services during  Chin-Lushai Expedition”.  He served in the Chin Hills operations, 1892; was in command of Tlantlang Column (clasp); was promoted Major, 1891; served with the Chitral Relief Force, 1895 (Medal and clasp); with the Tirah Expedition, 1897-98; was present at the actions of Sampagha, Arhanga and Saransar; operations against Khani Kheyl Cham-Kannis; operations Bazar Valley, 25 to 30 December 1897, and with the Khyber Field Force, 1898 (Despatches; two clasps; Brevet of Colonel); promoted Colonel in 1902, and appointed in 1902 to command a Second Class District in India; created a CB, 1903; became Major General, 1904, and commanded Garhwal Brigade, 1904; Colonel, 4th Gurkha Rifles, 1900; 5th (Mhow) Division, 1907; 3rd (Lahore) Division, 1907-8; became Lieutenant General 21 March 1908; created a KCB, 1909; retired 15 February 1909.
KCB (mil), DSO, Afghan (0) (Lt 3 Ghoorkha's), IGS 1854 (5) Burma 1885-87, Looshai 1889-92 Chin Lushain Burma 1889-92 Chin Hills 1892-93 (Capt 3 Goor Regt), IGS 1895 (3) RofC PF Tirah (Maj DSO 4th Ghurkhas).  Spink Feb 70 £300 (including miniatures and father's SA 1853 Medal).
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Bengal Staff Corps
BrowneGeorge FitzherbertCaptainBROWNE, GEORGE FITZHERBERT, Captain, was born on the 29th January 1851.  He entered the 48th Regiment 6 July 1870; became Captain, Northamptonshire Regiment in 1882.  He was DAAG and QMG, and QMG Dublin District, 1884-85, and DAAG at Headquarters, Ireland, 1885-89; went on Special Service to the West Coast of Africa, serving in the expedition against the Yonnies, 1887-88; was mentioned in Despatches, received the Medal and clasp, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 9 March 1888]: "George Fitzherbert Browne, Captain, Northamptonshire Regiment.  For operations in Burma".  He also served on the West Coast of Africa in 1892, taking part in the attack on Tambi; was wounded, and received an additional clasp.  From 1896 to 1903 he was Military Attache at Pekin (Medal).  He was created a CB in 1905, and became Major General 10 October 1906, retiring from the Service on 15 February 1913.  Major General G F Browne held the Jubilee and Coronation Medals.  He married in 1911, Harriet, widow of Captain Bankes Tomlin.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Northamptonshire Regiment
BudgeonWilliam ThomasLieutenant ColonelBUDGEN, WILLIAM THOMAS, Colonel, was born on 11 June 1839, son of Major General Budgen, Royal Engineers, and Mrs Budgen (nee F C Maule).  He joined the Royal Artillery about 1856; served in the Burma Campaign of 1885-87, commanding RA through most of it, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 25 November 1887]: "William Thomas Budgeon, Lieutenant Colonel and Colonel, Royal Artillery.  For services in Burma".  He commanded Royal Artillery, Karachi, Sind, India, 1887-89; Brigadier General commanding Bombay District, India, 1889-94.  He died 28 February 1894, at Mentone, France, on his way home from India, of pneumonia, after influenza.  He married Olivia G M Jervois, daughter of Major General John Gordon Jervois, RE, of Bath, and had two sons: Temple Gordon de Courcy, Cape Civil Service, served as a private during the South African War (wounded), and also in the European War (two Medals); William Napier, Brevet Lieutenant Colonel, RA, DSO, and one daughter: Florence Clara, married, in 1908, Lieutenant Colonel Lewis Stratford Tolemache Halliday, VC, CB, RMLI.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Artillery
BunburyVesey ThomasCaptainBUNBURY, VESEY THOMAS, Captain, was born 25 September 1859, second son of Right Reverend Thomas Bunbury, DD, Lord Bishop of Limerick.  He was educated at St Columba's College, County Dublin, and was commissioned in the 35th Foot 22 January 1879, and transferred to the 3rd Foot 15 March 1879; becoming Lieutenant, East Kent Regiment, 20 October 1880; Captain 1 July 1887, and Captain, Leicestershire Regiment, 19 November 1887.  He served in the Burmese War of 1889 (Medal and clasp); was Adjutant, Leicestershire Regiment, 14 January 1891 to 13 January 1895, and was employed with the Egyptian Army 29 November 1895 to 27 August 1901; he served in the expedition to Dongola in 1896, taking part in the operations of 7 June and 19 September; was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 3 November 1896]; Egyptian Medal with two clasps.  In 1897 he served in the Nile Expedition, and was present at the capture of Abu Hamed.  He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 4 November 1898]; received the Medal; the clasp to the Egyptian Medal; the 3rd Class Medjidie, and was given the Brevet of Major 11 December 1897.  He served in the Nile Expedition of 1898, being present at the Battle of Khartoum; was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 4 November 1898]; received the Medal; a clasp to the Egyptian Medal, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 15 November 1898]: "Vesey Thomas Bunbury, Captain and Brevet Major, The Leicestershire Regiment.  In recognition of services during the recent operations in the Sudan".  The Insignia were sent to the Office Commanding, Egypt, 2 November 1898, and presented by the Duke of Connaught at Omdurman 29 February 1899.  He served in the Nile Expedition of 1899, and received a clasp to the Egyptian Medal.  He became Major 27 February 1900, and Lieutenant Colonel 11 November 1906.  He became Colonel 11 November 1910; was created a CB in 1911, and retired 21 May 1913, with the rank of Brigadier General.  He served in the European War as Provost-Marshal to the British Expeditionary Force from August 1914 to December 1915; Was mentioned in Despatches; created a CMG; received the 1914 Star, the Croix de Guerre of Belgium, and was made Commander of the Crown of Belgium.  He was retired from the Army 25 September 1916, having reached the age limit for his rank, and was re-employed as Permanent President of an Area Quartering Committee, April 1917 to May 1918.  General Bunbury held the Coronation Medal of 1902.  He married, in 1904, the Honourable Daisy Carleton, daughter of Baroness Dorchester.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Leicestershire Regiment
CampbellAlexanderCaptainCAMPBELL, ALEXANDER, Captain, was born at Ballyalton, County Down, in 1839, son of William Campbell; educated at Belfast; entered the Bombay Marine in 1865.  He went to sea in 1854 as an Apprentice aboard the ACADIA and served in this vessel until 1858 when he joined the DELGANCY as a Third Officer.  He next served as 2nd Officer aboard the BAROUSMORE, and was one of the 19 survivors aboard this vessel when she foundered in a cyclone in 1863.  He joined the Indian Marine as a 1st Grade Officer aboard CLYDE in August 1865 and served in this rank aboard COROMANDEL (January 1866), and SIR JOHN LAWRENCE (August 1867).  He was promoted to Commander in August 1867 and subsequently served aboard COROMANDEL (June 1869), SIR JOHN LAWRENCE (November 1869), HUGH ROSE (February 1870), DALHOUSIE (May 1870), HUGH ROSE (July 1872), QUANTUNG (May 1876), KARACHI (April 1878), ENTERPRISE (January 1879), CELEBRITY (February 1880), and ENTERPRISE (May 1880).
 He was appointed Dock Master at Karachi Dockyard (September 1880) also carrying out duties of Superintendent of Marine, and next appointed Port Officer Rangoon (April 1883), Staff Officer Bombay Dockyard (December 1884), and Transport Officer Calcutta (October 1885).  In this capacity he was employed in connection with the 1885-87 Burma Expeditionary Force.  He was mentioned in Despatches and created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 20 May 1887]: “Alexander Campbell, Captain, RIM.  For operations in Burma”.  He was also created a Companion of the Indian Empire.  Only three Officers of the Royal Indian Marine were recommended for any form of reward for their services during the Burma Campaign 1885-87.  Of these men only one.  His award stems from a recommendation made by Sir Charles Bernard, Chief Commissioner, Burma, to General the Hon G Chesney, penned in this friendly manner:  "I wish to bring to your notice the good services done by Officers of the Indian Marine in Upper Burma during the last 16 months.  They have been partly under the Military Authorities, and their work has been highly appreciated by the soldiers.  Since none of the Marine Officers received recognition for their services while soldiers, navy men and civilians have been more or less honoured in the ‘Upper Burma Campaign Gazette', and on the occasion of the Jubilee.  As I am leaving Burma for good I wish to recommend to your notice two men who have come most to the front among Indian Marine Officers:  Captain Alexander Campbell.  He was Transport Officer with the Expedition, arranged marshalling etc. of steamers, was Transport Officer at Mandalay for months.  Did well and gave satisfaction all round, while at the same time holding his own.  General Prendergast spoke highly of his work.  But none but naval men knew the difficulties of conducting 28 steamers, with flats, smoothly and regularly up a shallow river without pilots.  The IRRAWADDY, KATHLEEN and Marine Survey Party helped, but Captain Campbell was the real Commodore, or sailing-master of the fleet.”
Campbell subsequently received the following appointments: Acting Deputy Director Indian Marine (May 1886), Staff Officer Bombay Dockyard (April 1887), Officiating Director Indian Marine (May 1887), Deputy Director Indian Marine, Bombay (November 1888), Officiating Director Indian Marine, Bombay (May 1890), Deputy Director Karachi Dockyard (August 1890), Officiating Director Bombay Dockyard (October 1891), Deputy Director Karachi Dockyard (October 1891). He continued to serve in this capacity at Bombay and Karachi Dockyards until he retired on 31 July 1894.   Captain Campbell married, in 1872, Jane (she died in 1893), daughter of Weston Grimshaw, and they had three sons: Captain E P Campbell, EE; Commander C E Campbell, RIM, DSO, and Major W Campbell, IA, DSO, and two daughters: Alexandra and Constance.  He married again in 1908, Ellinore, daughter of Richard Pardon, MD, and they had two sons and one daughter.  Captain Campbell died on the 26th September 1914.
[CIE (b/b)], DSO (gold), IGS 1854 (1) Burma 1885-7 (Capt HMIMS).  DNW Feb 97 £1,950.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Indian Marine
CampbellArchibald JohnLieutenantCAMPBELL, ARCHIBALD JOHN, Lieutenant, was born 15 November 1872, son of Colonel J H Campbell.  He was educated at Wellington, and joined the 19th (Queen Alexandra's Own Royal) Hussars, 23 December 1893.  He served in South Africa, 1899-1900, and was present at the operations in Natal, 1899, including the actions at Reitfontein and Lombard's Kop; the defence of Ladysmith, including the sortie of 7 December 1899, and the action of 6 January 1900 (Queen's Medal and clasp).  He was in command of a Column in West Africa, 1901—2, in the Aro Expedition, and was severely wounded; received the Medal and clasp; was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 12 September 1902], and created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 12 September 1902]: "Archibald John Campbell, Lieutenant, 19th Hussars.  For services during the Aro Expedition in Southern Nigeria".  He was invested by the King; Warrant and Statutes were sent 8 January 1903.  He was in command of the Ibeku Expedition in 1902 (clasp).  He became Captain 1 April 1903, and joined the Reserve; of Officers 10 November 1909.  He served in the European War as Staff Captain, 19th Hussars, 1914-15.  Captain Campbell married, in 1896, Ethel, third daughter of J Gretton.
DSO, QSA (1) DofL (Lt DSO 19H), AGS 1902 (2) S Nigeria 1902 Aro 1901-2 (Lt 19H), 1914 Star & bar, BWM, VM & MID (Capt).  Dixon Oct 98 £5,000.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
19th (Queen Alexandra's Own Royal) Hussars
CampbellCharlesCaptainCAMPBELL, CHARLES, Captain, Royal Navy, was born at St Andrews 26 March 1847, eldest son of John Campbell, of Saddell.  He was educated at Brenchley Vicarage, Staplehurst; at the Royal Naval Academy, Gosport, and entered the Britannia in 1860.  He gained the diving prize for longest under water—one minute, 53 seconds (then a record).  He joined HMS Magicienne under Prince Leiningen; served in the Marlborough, Mediterranean Flagship, and after seeing service in the Amphion, Royal Oak and Racer, he joined, in 1868, Galatea, under HRH the Duke of Edinburgh, and made a trip round the world.  He was Flag Lieutenant to Admirals Campbell and Lord John Hay.  He was present at the insurrection in Crete; at the taking of Cyprus; was Transport Officer during Lord Wolseley's Campaign against Arabi Pasha (Egyptian Medal and Khedive's Star); appointed to command HMS Lily; then in the Philomel in command of the East Coast of Africa.  He suppressed the uprisings at Lamu and Witu; seized the Palace at Zanzibar; commanded the road-cutting party to Nana's stronghold, four days under fire, and led the centre attack; was created a CB, and received the African Medal.  In the Theseus he went to Benin, and was Second in Command of the Expedition against the King.  He saved 27 wounded from the fire that swept the city, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 25 May 1897]: "Charles Campbell, CB, Captain, Royal Navy.  In recognition of services during the recent Expedition to Benin".  He was Second in Command to Admirals Harris and Noel during the operations in Crete, 1897-99; commanded Medway Gunnery School, 1899-1902; was ADC to Queen Victoria and to King Edward 1899 to January 1902.  Rear Admiral C Campbell married (1st), Esther Constance, daughter of Colonel J O Fairlie, of Coodham, Ayrshire, and (secondly), Florence Geraldine, daughter of Colonel A E Ross.  He died 8 February 1911, and an obituary notice of him appeared in the ‘Times' of 10 February 1911.
KCMG, CB, DSO, 1897 Jubilee, Egypt (0) (Cmdr HMS Thalia), East & West Africa (1) Benin River 1894 Benin 1897 (Capt), Zanzibar, Order of the Brilliant Star (b/s).  Midland Medals Apr 78 £1,850.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Navy
CampbellColin CharlesLieutenant ColonelCAMPBELL, COLIN CHARLES, Colonel, was born on 18 June 1842, in India, and entered the Madras Army in 1860; became Captain, MSC in 1872; Major, 1880; served in the Burmese Expedition, 1885-86-87, commanding expedition to Kandat.  He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 22 June 1886], and created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 25 November 1887]: "Colin Charles Campbell, Lieutenant Colonel, Madras Infantry.  For operations in Burma".  He became Lieutenant Colonel 22 December 1886, and Colonel 22 December 1890.  Colonel Campbell retired from the service in 1903.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Madras Infantry
CampbellFrederickCaptainCAMPBELL, FREDERICK, Brevet Major, was born 25 February 1860, youngest son of Captain Leveson Granville Alexander Campbell, of Fairfield, Ayrshire, and Annie, daughter of  David Cowan, Lieutenant, 93rd Highlanders.  He was educated at Wellington College, and became Lieutenant Royal Ayr and Wigton Militia, 1877-78; under-officer, Royal Military College, 1878, and joined HM 40th Foot as Second Lieutenant 13 August 1879.  He became Lieutenant, South Lancashire Regiment, 15 March 1880, and Lieutenant, Bengal Staff Corps, 18 September 1882; Queen's Own Corps of Guides, 1882-89.  He served in the Hazara Expedition, 1888; Assistant Superintendent, Signalling (Medal with clasp); became Captain, ISC, 13 August 1890; was DAAG (Musketry), Bengal, from 22 August 1891 to 2 March 1895.  He served in the Chitral Relief Force, 1895; was present at the storming of the Malakand Pass and at the action at the Panjkora River.  He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 15 November 1895]; was given the Brevet of Major 22 January 1896, and received the Medal and clasp; North-West Frontier, India, 1897-98; Malakand, operations in Bajaur and the Mamund country, Utmankheyl (Despatches, 11 January 1898); in Buner, and was mentioned in Despatches 18 March and 22 April 1898; received a clasp, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 20 May 1898]: "Frederick Campbell, Captain and Brevet Major, Indian Staff Corps.  In recognition of services during the recent operations on the North-West Frontier of India".  The Insignia, etc, were sent to the Commander-in-Chief in India, and presented by Lieutenant General Sir William Lockhart.  Captain Campbell became Major, IA, 13 August 1899; was Commandant, 40th Pathans, 1899-1906; Tibet, 1903-4; operations at and around Gyantse; took part in the march to Lhassa (Medal with clasp; Despatches, 13 December 1904; Brevet Colonel, 10 November 1904); was AAG (Musketry), Headquarters, India, 4 June 1906 to 19 June 1908; Colonel, 4 June 1907; Brigade Commander (Colonel on the Staff), India, 20 June 1908 to 17 March 1911; Major General 19 June 1911; created a CB; Colonel, 40th Pathans, 1911; Brigade Commander, India, 18 March 1911 to 25 June 1915; Divisional Commander, India, 26 June 1915 to 25 June 1919.  He served in the war, 1914-16 (Despatches; created a KCB, and was promoted Lieutenant General); promoted General, 1919.  He married, in 1886, Eleanor Martha, daughter of  J Cannon, and they had a son, Frederick Charles Gunning, MC, Captain, 40th Pathans, born on 11 August 1887, and a daughter, Eleanor May Alexandra, married, in 1916, to Captain G E D Learoyd, Adjutant, 21st (E of I) Lancers.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Indian Staff Corps
CampbellKenneth Jeffery RankinCaptainCAMPBELL, KENNETH JEFFERY RANKIN, Captain, was employed with the forces of the Niger Coast Protectorate in the operations against the Chief Nanna in Benin River in 1894; was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 21 December 1894], received the Medal and clasp, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 10 April 1896]: "Kenneth Jeffery Rankin Campbell, Captain, The Suffolk Regiment.  In recognition of services during the recent operations on the Benin River".  Lieutenant Colonel K J R Campbell served in the European War. 
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Suffolk Regiment
Capel CureHerbertCaptainCAPEL CURE, HERBERT, Captain, was born 23 October 1859, at Eaton Place, London, son of Robert Capel Cure, of Blake Hall, Ongar, Essex, by his first wife, who was a daughter of the Right Reverend George Murray, Bishop of Rochester.  He was educated for the Navy, but was too ill at the time of the examination, and entered the 61st (Gloucestershire) Regiment 11 May 1878; He was considered in the first ranks of polo players in India between 1883 and 1894.  He captained the 2nd Gloucestershire Regimental Polo Team in India, when the regiment won the Inter-Regimental Cup; played at Lucknow in 1892, and again in 1893.  He was also captain of the Gloucester team which played in the Final and lost by one point (a disputed one), and again in the Baroda Tournament which was won by the regiment.  He was secretary of the Karachi Races, 1883—84, and was a winner on several occasions in these races.  He also managed the Karachi and Hyderabad (Scinde) Pig-Sticking Club during the same time.  He won the Guzerat Pig-Sticking Cup in 1885, was a very fine revolver shot.  He became Major 4 September 1895; served during the Burma Campaign, 1886-88, and for his services as Transport Officer with the Ruby Mines Column, Burma, was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 3 August 1888]: "For services during operations in Burma.  Herbert Capel Cure, Captain, Gloucestershire Regiment".  He also received the Medal with clasp, and was mentioned in Despatches for services during the operations in Burma.  He served in the Boer War  taking part in the operations in Natal in 1899, including the actions at Reitfontein and Lombard's Kop.  He was taken prisoner on 30 Oct 1899 and received the Queen's Medal with clasp.  He became Lieutenant Colonel 25 October 1903, and was given Brevet of Colonel 25 October 1906, becoming Colonel 25 October 1907.  He afterwards commanded his regiment.  The 'Times' of 21 March 1909, says: "On 19 March, at Srinagar, Kashmir, Lieutenant Colonel H Capel Cure, DSO, lately commanding 1st Battalion The Gloucestershire Regiment, aged 49".  Colonel Capel Cure married, in India, Mary, daughter of W J Angerstein, of Weeting Hall, Norfolk. 
The DSO Book states that he 'served in the Afghan War, 1879-80 (Medal)' but no evidence has been found to support this.  The above portrait from 1904 shows him wearing the medals ribbons for the DSO, IGS and QSA only.
Obituary for ‘The Times', Friday 23 April 1909. "The death is announced from Srinagar, Kashmir of Lt Col H Capel Cure lately commanding the 1st Battalion The Gloucestershire Regiment at the age of 49.  Lt Col Capel Cure took part in the Burmese expedition in 1886-7 and acted as transport officer with the Ruby Mines column. He was mentioned in despatches and obtained the medal with clasp and the DSO. During the South African war he served in Natal and received the Queen's medal with clasp.  A correspondent supplies the following particulars of the accident which caused the death of Col Capel Cure:  "He had just returned from a shooting expedition, which had been most successful, and was in the highest spirits. After dinner he went to see if his men had cleaned his guns. A few minutes afterwards a report was heard, and he came back into the room where he had left his wife, with a pistol in his hand, saying, ‘I have had an escape'. It appeared that his men had left an automatic Colt pistol loaded and at full cock, and on his taking it up it had gone off, the bullet grazing the fingers of his left hand. He was much annoyed with the men for their carelessness, and his wife tried to persuade him to leave things as they were for the night, but he said ‘I must have my weapons cleaned', and, taking off the magazine of the pistol, he returned to his room. Almost immediately there was a second report and a cry, followed by a fall. When the door was opened the Colonel was found dead. The action of removing the magazine placed another cartridge in the barrel and left the pistol at full cock. The Colonel was a noted revolver shot, and it is extraordinary that a man of his experience should have forgotten the danger of the last cartridge. The above facts were proved at the inquest held on March 20th, when a verdict of ‘accidental death' was returned."
DSO, IGS 1854 (2) Burma 1885-7 Burma 1887-9 (Capt Gloucester Regt), QSA (1) Natal (Major DSO Gloucester Regt).
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Gloucestershire Regiment
CarewGeorge Albert LadeMajorCAREW, GEORGE ALBERT LADE, Major, was born 10 March 1862, son of Robert R Carew and Mrs Robert R Carew.  He was commissioned in the Hampshire Militia in 1879, and was gazetted to the 7th Hussars as Lieutenant (from the Militia) 31 October 1883, becoming Captain 19 December 1889, and Major 2 April 1898.  He took part in the operations in South Africa in 1896-97; was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 9 March 1897]; commanded a column in the campaign of 1897; was again mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 18 February 1898]; received the Medals and clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 20 May 1898]: "George Albert Lade Carew, Major, 7th Hussars.  In recognition of services during the operations in Mashonaland in 1897".  Insignia sent to GOC, Cape; forwarded by OC, 7th Hussars, Natal, 24 July 1898.  He served with the Rhodesian Field Force, 1900, as Special Service Officer, and with the 7th Hussars, 1901-2, in the South African War.  He took part in the operations in Rhodesia, March to May 1900, and in the operations in the Transvaal, March to August 1900; operations in the Transvaal, March to 31 May 1902; operations in Cape Colony, December 1901 to March 1902.  Major Carew retired in 1902.
DSO, BSACM for Rhodesia 1896 (1) Mashonaland 1897 (Capt 7H), QSA (6) CC Rhod OFS Tr 01 02 (Maj DSO 7H).  The Gazette Apr 82 £2,250.  Glendining Mar 93 est £2-2.5k.  DNW Sep 01 £3.8k.  Romsey Medals Sep 03 £7k.  Liverpool Medals Dec 05 £7,500.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
7th (The Queen's Own) Hussars
CarewRichard HughSurgeon MajorCAREW, RICHARD HUGH, Surgeon Major, adopted the medical profession, and became LRCP and LRCSI.  He joined the Medical Staff, and served in the Abyssinian Expedition, 1868; Capture of Magdala (Medal).  He took part in the Sikkim Expedition, 1888, as Senior Medical Officer; was mentioned in Despatches; received the Medal with clasp, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 12 April 1889]: "Richard Hugh Carew, Surgeon Major, Medical Staff.  In recognition of services during operations in Sikkim".  He became Lieutenant Colonel, Royal Army Medical Corps, 7 December 1891, and Colonel, 11 December 1895; took part in the operations on the North-West Frontier of India, 1897-98, serving as Senior Medical Officer with the Tochi Field Force.  He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 11 February 1898], and received the Medal and clasp.  He became Colonel 7 December 1895.  Colonel Carew died 24 September 1902.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Army Medical Service
CarletonFrederick MontgomerieCaptainCARLETON, FREDERICK MONTGOMERIE, Captain, was born 21 July 1867, youngest son of General Henry Carleton, CB, Royal Artillery.  He was educated at the Military College, Oxford; joined the King's Own Regiment 3 October 1888; became Lieutenant 1 April 1890; was Adjutant, Royal Lancaster Regiment, 12 July 1891 to 11 July 1895; was employed with the Egyptian Army 21 March 1896 to 16 October 1897; served with the Expedition to Dongola in 1896, and was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 3 November 1896].  He also served in the Nile Expedition in 1897 (Medal); was promoted to Captain, King's Own Regiment, 11 May 1898, and was attached to the West African Regiment 9 April 1898 to 24 June 1899.  He was Acting Staff Officer, Mendiland Expedition (including Songo Town-Kwalu Expedition), afterwards with the Karene and Protectorate Expeditions.  He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 29 December 1899]; received the Medal and Clasp, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 9 January 1900]: "Frederick Montgomerie Carleton, Captain, Royal Lancaster Regiment.  For services whilst employed in Sierra Leone".  The Insignia, etc, were sent to the Commander-in-Chief, South Africa, and the DSO presented by Lieutenant General Hildyard, Commanding 5th Division, 22 April 1900, in Tonono Valley Camp, near Elandslaagte.  He became ADC to the Major General Commanding the 5th Infantry Brigade, South Africa, 13 November 1899 to 11 December 1901.  He was present at the Relief of Ladysmith, including the operations of the 17th to the 24th January 1900, and the action at Spion Kop (slightly wounded).  He was mentioned in Despatches by Sir R Buller 30 March; 19 June and 9 November 1900 [London Gazette, 8 February 1901]: received the Brevet of Major; Queen's Medal with six clasps, and the King's Medal with two clasps.  He passed the Staff College in 1902; became Major 26 June 1906, and retired 22 February 1908.  He served in the European War and retired with the rank of Brigadier General 20 October 1917.  In 1890, he married Gwendolen, eldest daughter of S Lloyd, of The Priory, Warwick, and of Dolobran, Montgomeryshire, and they had two sons and one daughter.  His favourite recreations were hunting, shooting and polo.
DSO, Queen's Sudan (Lt 5 Btn EA), East & West Africa (1) Sierre Leonne 1898-99 (Capt KORLR), QSA (6) CC TH OFS RofL Tr LN (Maj DSO R Lanc Regt), KSA (2) (Major RLR), 1914-15 Star, BWM, VM (Brig Gen), Khedive Sudan (2) Firket Hafir (unnamed).  Spink Jun 85 £2,200.  Spink Dec 85 £3,250.  BDW May 93 £2,600.  Spink Sep 93 £3,800.  Spink Jun 95 £3,650.  Spink Sep 98 £3,350.  Dixon May 99 £3,900.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
(King's Own) Royal Lancaster Regiment
CarletonHugh DudleyMajorCARLETON, HUGH DUDLEY, Major, was born 24 December 1865, son of General Henry Alexander Carleton, CB.  He joined the Army, as a Second Lieutenant, in the West India Regiment, 6 March 1889; was Garrison Adjutant, Sierra Leone, 10 April to 12 August 1890; promoted Lieutenant 1 November 1890; was again Garrison Adjutant, Sierra Leone, 26 August 1891 to 3 January 1892.  He served in the Gambia Expedition in 1891-92, against the native chief, Fodey Kabba, receiving the Medal and clasp.  From 18 September 1893 to 17 January 1894, he was ADC to the Governor and Commander-in-Chief, Jamaica, and he became Garrison Adjutant, Jamaica, 7 February 1895; was promoted Captain 29 July 1896.  He again saw active service, 1897-98, in Lagos, where he was employed in the Hinterland, and was mentioned in Despatches.  He was promoted Major in 1901; served in 1902 in Ashanti (Provost-Marshal, Despatches; Medal with clasp for Relief of Kumasi).  He received the DSO for his services during the Aro Expedition in Southern Nigeria, where he served as Chief of the Staff; was mentioned in Despatches, and received the Medal and clasp.  His Companionship of the Distinguished Service Order was gazetted 12 September 1902: "Hugh Dudley Carleton, Major, West India Regiment.  In recognition of services during the Aro Expedition".  He was invested by the King 24 October 1902.  He died 9 August 1906.  Major Carleton married, in 1904, Lady Jane Edith Seymour, youngest daughter of the 6th Marquess of Hertford.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
West India Regiment
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