The DSO was instituted in 1886 and used the VRI cyper for issues up to an just after the death of Queen Victoria.  Listed here are all the DSOs awarded with the VRI cypher except this issued for the Boer War which can be found here.

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(456 Records)

 Surname   Forename   Rank   Notes   Unit 
MorganCecil BuckleyMajorMORGAN, CECIL BUCKLEY, Major, was born 18 November 1860, at Streatham, London, son of Thomas Morgan, FSA.  He was educated at Dulwich College, and at Sandhurst; entered the West India Regiment 23 August 1884.  He served in West Africa, 1892-93-95; took part in the operations on the Niger Territories, and was twice wounded.  He married, on 13 June 1895, Maud Mary, daughter of Richard Keeling, and their children were: Hermione; Phyllis; Basil Morgan, Second Lieutenant, Hampshire Regiment, born in 1898; Evadue, and Donald, born in 1900.  Major Morgan served in West Africa, 1897-98, taking part in the operations in Sierra Leone and in the Mendiland Expedition (severely wounded); commanded an Expedition up the Jong River.  He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 29 December 1899], and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 9 January 1900]: "Cecil Buckley Morgan, Major, West India Regiment.  In recognition of services in Sierra Leone".  The Insignia were presented by Lady Cardew, wife of the Governor of Sierra Leone, at a parade of all the troops in garrison in review order 19 May 1900.  He had been promoted Major 20 January 1898.  Major Morgan served in the South African War, 1901-2, on the Staff, and as District Commandant, afterwards Administrator, No 9 Area.  He took part in the operations in Cape Colony, 1901-2, and received the Queen's Medal with three clasps.  He retired and joined the Reserve of Officers.  Major Morgan served in the European War; became Temporary Lieutenant Colonel, and commanded the 22nd (Service) Battalion of the Durham Light Infantry, British Expeditionary Force.  France.  Lieutenant Colonel C B Morgan died on 29 March 1918, of a gunshot wound received in action.  His son was killed in the same action. 
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
West India Regiment
MorganHill GodfreyCaptainMORGAN, HILL GODFREY, Captain, was born 20 June 1862, son of Captain Hill Faulconer Morgan, 28th Foot.  He joined the 1st Gloucestershire Regiment from the Militia in 1883, and transferred to the Army Service Corps in 1888, as Captain.  Captain Morgan served in the Dongola Expeditionary Force in 1896-8, being present at the operations of 19 September; was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 3 November 1896], and created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 17 November 1896]: "Hill Godfrey Morgan, Captain, Army Service Corps.  In recognition of services during the recent operations in Egypt and the Sudan".  For his services in this campaign he also received the 4th Class Medjidie, the British Medal and the Khedive's Medal with two clasps.  He served in the Nile Expedition, including Khartoum (Despatches, 30 September 1898, 4th Class Osmanieh, clasp).  He served in the South African War, 1899-1902, as Director of Supplies; operations in Natal, 1899; Relief of Ladysmith, including action at Colenso; operations of 17-24 January 1900, and action at Spion Kop; operations of 5-7 February 1900, and action at Vaal Kranz; operations at the Tugela Heights 14-27 February 1900, and action at Pieters Hill; operations in Natal (March to June 1900); operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, 1900, including action at Belfast; operations in the Transvaal, Orange River Colony and Cape Colony, 30 November 1900 to 31 May 1902.  He was mentioned in Despatches (Sir G S White, 2 December 1899; Sir R H Buller, 30 March and 9 November 1900) [London Gazette, 8 February 1901] and 29 July 1902; was given the Brevet of Lieutenant Colonel, Queen's Medal with six clasps, King's Medal with two clasps, created a CB.  He was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel on 3 February 1905; was given the Brevet of Colonel, and retired 7 November 1906.  During the European War Colonel Morgan served from August 1914, as Assistant Director of Supplies, Central Force, and from January 1915, as Administrative Member, Forage Committee.  He was mentioned three times for services, promoted Brigadier General 1919; created a CMG in 1918 and a Knight of the British Empire in 1919 (War Medal).  Sir H G Morgan married in 1886, Fanny, daughter of J Bousfield, of Grassmere, Craneswater Park, Southsea.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Army Service Corps
MorrisArthur HenryLieutenantMORRIS, ARTHUR HENRY, Lieutenant, was born 3 January 1861, at Ryde, Isle of Wight, eldest son of Reverend Henry Morris and Eliza Jemima Morris (nee Broughton).  He was educated at Canterbury, and joined the Royal Irish Regiment 27 January 1883, from the Yorkshire Artillery Militia; took part in the Soudan Expedition, 1884-85 (Medal with clasp, and Bronze Star); served in the Burma Campaign and Expedition against the Red Karens, 1885-87 (Despatches; Medal with two clasps); was Chief Transport Officer to Chin-Lushai Expedition (Despatches; clasp; thanked by the Government of India, and created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 14 November 1890]: "Arthur Henry Morris, Lieutenant, The Royal Irish Regiment.  In recognition of services during the Chin-Lushai Expedition".  He became Captain in 1891, commanded two expeditions against tribes in the Northern Territories of the Gold Coast, 1900; (Despatches twice); West Africa, 1900; operations in Ashanti, commanded column which forced its way into Kumasi from the north (severely wounded); defence of Kumasi, commanded garrison, and later on commanded the column which cut its way out of Kumasi (Medal with clasp; Brevet of Lieutenant Colonel; Despatches); commanded Expedition against the Tiansis, 1902 (Despatches); Chief Commissioner, Northern Territories, Gold Coast, 1899-1904; created a CMG, 1904.  Lieutenant Colonel Morris married, in 1902, Dorothy Mary Wilkie, niece and adopted daughter of Walter Laverton, of Manchester, and they had one son, John Henry Morris (born 4 October 1908).  He commanded the Duke of York's Royal Military School, 1908-13; became Colonel, 23 November 1908, and retired in July 1913.  He was Commandant of an internment camp from 1915.  His favourite recreations were hunting and shooting. 
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Irish Regiment
MorseFrank AlexanderLieutenantMORSE, FRANK ALEXANDER, Lieutenant, became Lieutenant, South Staffordshire Regiment, 4 May 1884; served in Burma in 1885-87, part of the time with the Mounted Infantry; was several times mentioned in Despatches; received the Medal and clasp, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 25 November 1887]: "Frank Alexander Morse, Lieutenant, Somerset Light Infantry.  For services in Burma".  He became Captain 4 January 1890, and he resigned from the Army 11 February 1891.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
(Prince Albert's) Somerset Light Infantry
MurphyWilliam ReedSurgeon MajorMURPHY, WILLIAM REED, Major, was born 23 October 1849, son of John Doyle Murphy and Rebecca Reed; educated at Clongowes Wood College, County Kildare; Trinity College, Dublin, and Royal College of Surgeons, Ireland.  Took all prizes there during student course, and all at Meath Hospital.  Took first place and First Herbert Prize at Netley on entering Indian Medical Service on 30 March 1872; served with the Indian Contingent, Malta and Cyprus 1878; in the Afghanistan Campaign of 1878-80 (Despatches; Medal and clasp; received the 'Special thanks of the Brigadier General Commanding the Cavalry Brigade', when with his regiment, 19th Bengal Lancers at the cavalry action of Pat Kao Shana, for conduct in action "at great personal risk" [London Gazette, 22 October 1880]); Hazara Campaign of 1888 (Despatches; Indian Medal and clasp); Lushai Campaign of 1888-89 (clasp).  PMO Lushai Column, Chin-Lushai Field Force, 1889-90 (Despatches; Mentioned by the Government of India; clasp).  Created Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 14 November 1890]: "William Reed Murphy, Surgeon Major, Indian Medical Service, Bengal".  His DSO was awarded "In recognition of services during  Chiu-Lushai Expedition".  Chitral Relief Force, 1895 (Medal and clasp).  PMO Kurram Kohat Force, 1897 (Despatches an 1 two clasps).  PMO Kurram Movable Column, Tirah Field Force, 1897-98 (Despatches and clasp).  was a Member of the Royal Institution of Great Britain.  Promoted Surgeon Major in 1884, and Lieutenant Colonel in 1892.  Retired in 1899. 
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Indian Medical Service
MurrayAndrewLieutenant ColonelMURRAY, ANDREW, Colonel, was born 6 June 1837, in Edinburgh, son of Andrew Murray, Junior Advocate, Edinburgh, and Mary Stewart.  He joined the Edinburgh County Militia in 1855; became Ensign, 60th Foot, 7 February 1858, and was transferred to the 78th Highlanders 19 February 1858; became Lieutenant, 16 August 1861; Captain, 2 October 1866, and Brevet Major, 15 January 1880.  He served with the 78th Highlanders in the Afghan War in 1880 (Medal); in the Egyptian War, 1882, in command of the detachments, 2nd Seaforth Highlanders, and was present at the Battle of Tel-el-Kebir (Medal and clasp; Fourth Class Osmanieh, and Khedive's Star).  He became Major, 1 July 1881; Lieutenant Colonel, 27 March 1883, and Colonel, 27 March 1887.  In the Hazara Campaign in 1888, he was in command of a Reserve Column.  He later commanded the Second Advance Column until the conclusion of the campaign.  He received a Medal, was twice mentioned in Despatches, once by General G N Channer, Commanding the 1st Brigade, Hazara Field Force; received the Medal with clasp, and in recognition of his distinguished service when in command of the Advance Column, was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 12 April 1889]: "For services during the operations in Hazara.  Andrew Murray, Lieutenant Colonel and Colonel, Half-Pay".  Colonel Murray commanded the 72nd and 79th Regimental Districts from 6 June 1890 to December 1894.  He retired on retired pay 6 June 1904 (having retired on half-pay in March 1899), and died on the 4th May 1915.  An obituary notice appeared in the ‘Times' of 6 May 1915.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
(Duke of Albany's Ross-shire Buffs) Seaforth Highl
MurrayKenelm DigbyLieutenant ColonelMURRAY, KENELM DIGBY, Lieutenant Colonel, was born at Dover 6 February 1839, third son of Lieutenant Colonel Sir J Digby Murray, 10th Baronet, of Black Barony, Peeblesshire, and of Frances, his wife, daughter of Peter Pattern Bold.  He was educated at Trinity College, Glenalmond, and at private schools, and joined the 9th Regiment in 1860, exchanging into the 89th in 1869.  He married in 1870, Caroline, daughter of  Colonel George Thompson, CB, and their children were: Archibald Digby, born in 1878; Kenelm Digby Bold, born in 1879; Frances Anna, and Constance Digby.  He passed through the Stall College in 1876, and was DAA and QMG, 2nd Division, being present at the Battle of Tel-el-Kebir.  He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 2 November 1882], received the Medal and clasp and the Bronze Star, the Brevet of Lieutenant Colonel, and the 4th Class Osmanieh.  He was DAA and QMG at Alexandria, 1882-85, and AAG, Frontier Force, Egypt, from 1885 to 1886.  For his services in the Sudan Campaign, and especially at the action at Ginniss, he was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 9 February 1886], and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 26 November 1886]: "Kenelm Digby Murray, Lieutenant Colonel, Royal Irish Fusiliers.  For the Action at Ginniss".  In 1888 Lieutenant Colonel Murray succeeded to the command of the 1st Battalion Princess Victoria's Regiment,  the Royal Irish Fusiliers, and he became Colonel 9 January 1889.  From 1889 to 1894 he was AAG, Headquarters, India.  He was placed on half-pay, late Staff, 6 January 1894.  Colonel Murray's favourite recreations were shooting, riding, golf, etc  Colonel Murray died 19 February 1915. 
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
(Princess Victoria's) Royal Irish Fusiliers
NasonFortescue JohnMajorNASON, FORTESCUE JOHN, Major, was born 14 September 1859, son of Major General John Nason.  He was educated at Harrow, and was gazetted to the 26th Foot as Second Lieutenant 11 August 1880, becoming Lieutenant, Scottish Rifles, 1 July 1881, and Captain 17 May 1886; and was employed with the Egyptian Army 30 July 1888 to 5 March 1890; and again from 18 April 1896.  He served in the Sudan in 1889; was present at the action of Arguin, and was wounded (4th Class Medjidie; Medal and Bronze Star).  He was Adjutant, Scottish Rifles, 29 October 1890 to 28 October 1894.  He served in the Expedition to Dongola, 1896, as Brigade Major, 1st Brigade, taking part in the operations of 7 June and 19 September; was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 3 November 1896], and received the Egyptian Medal and two clasps.  He served in the Nile Expedition of 1897 (clasp to Egyptian Medal).  On 22 December 1897, he was promoted to Major.  In 1898 he served in the Nile Expedition, was present at the battles of the Atbara and Khartoum, and at the defeat of Ahmed Fedil's Army.  He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 30 September 1898, and 5 May 1899]; was given the Brevet of Lieutenant Colonel 16 November 1898; received the Medal, and three clasps to the Egyptian Medal, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 30 June 1899]: "Fortescue John Nason, Major and Brevet Lieutenant Colonel, Indian Staff Corps.  In recognition of services during the recent operations in the Sudan, including the battles of the Atbara and Khartoum".  The Insignia were presented to him by the Queen at Osborne 5 August 1899.  He served in the Nile Expedition of 1899, taking part in the first advance against the Khalifa, and received the 3rd Class Osmanieh, and a clasp to the Egyptian Medal.  He retired with the rank of Colonel 27 May 1905.  Colonel Nason served in the European War from 1914 to 1918; was three times mentioned in Despatches; received the Bronze Star (1914); was created a CMG, 1915, and a CB, 1918.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Indian Staff Corps
NealHenry Vincent McCannCaptainNEAL, HENRY VINCENT McCANN, Captain, joined the 3rd Battalion Scottish Rifles 29 Sept, 1894; served in West Africa, 1897-98, in Lagos, and was employed in the Hinterland; was present at the attack by the Baribas in the Borgu country, and was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 7 March 1899] (Medal and clasp).  He served in West Africa in 1899, taking part in the Expedition into the Central Division of the Niger Coast Protectorate (clasp).  In West Africa in 1900 he served in the operations in Ashanti, was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 4 December 1900], received the Medal with clasp, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 15 January 1901]: "Henry Vincent McCann Neal, Captain, 3rd Battalion Scottish Rifles.  In recognition of services in the recent operations in West Africa".  The Insignia were presented by the King 25 July 1901.  Captain Neal retired from the Army 16 July 1902, and joined the Special Reserve, from which he retired on 15 March 1913.  He was appointed a 1st Class District Commissioner in Southern Nigeria in 1905, and was Assistant Colonial Secretary, Lagos.  He married Mary, daughter of Frank Lane, and they had one daughter. 
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
(Cameronians) Scottish Rifles
NicholsonEdward Hugh MeredithLieutenantNICHOLSON, EDWARD HUGH MEREDITH, Lieutenant, RN was born 3 September 1876, eldest son of Colonel E H Nicholson (4th Nottinghamshire Regiment), Newark-on-Trent, Nottinghamshire, and Sarah, daughter of J Prior, late of Shipton Manor, Shipton-on-Cherwell.  He was educated at Eastman's, and at Stubbington, Fareham, and joined the Britannia in 1890.  He served in the Royal Sovereign, 1892—93; as Midshipman in the Raleigh, 1893-94; in the Naval Brigade, with Admiral Bedford, at Bathurst.  River Gambia, West Coast of Africa, February 1894, for the punishment of the Fodi Silah, a slave-raiding chief (African Medal, Gambia, 1894; clasp); as Midshipman in the St George (1894-96), he served with the punitive expedition against King Koko of Nimbi, Brass River, West Coast of Africa, February 1896 (Brass River, 1895; clasp).  He was at the RN College, 1896-97; in the Haughty, 1897.  He served with the Naval Brigade under Admiral Rawson, CB, at Mombasa, for the punishment of Mbaruk, an Arab chief; at the capture of Mwele, 17 August 1895 (Mwele, 1895, engraved on General African Medal).  As Sub-Lieutenant in the Hazard (1897-99), in command of a company of bluejackets and marines, he landed at Candia, 6 September 1898, for the protection of the Dime Office and the quelling of disturbances.  For these services he was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 2 December 1898]: "Edward Hugh Meredith Nicholson, Lieutenant, Royal Navy.  In recognition of services during the outbreak in Candia on the 6th September 1898".  (The Insignia presented by the Queen 15 December 1898.) In the Excellent, 1900-1, for a gunnery course; Cambridge, 1902; Australia, 1902; Venus, 1903; Bulwark, 1904.  Commander Nicholson was invalided from the Service in 1906.  He was a Director of Hadfields, Limited, Sheffield.  Commander Nicholson married, in 1904, Ethel, only daughter of R L Lambert, and they had one daughter.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Navy
NicholsonJohn SanctuaryCaptainNICHOLSON, JOHN SANCTUARY, Captain, was born in London 19 May 1863, second son of W Nicholson, of Basing Park, Alton, Hampshire, and of Mrs W Nicholson.  He was educated at Harrow, was gazetted to the 7th Hussars as Lieutenant 6 February 1884, and became Captain 23 January 1891.  He was on special service in South Africa, and acted as Staff Officer in the operations in Matabeleland in 1896, under General Carrington.  He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 9 March 1897], received the Medal, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 7 May 1897]: "John Sanctuary Nicholson, Captain, 7th Hussars.  In recognition of services during the recent operations in South Africa, 1896".  He was Commandant-General of the British South Africa Police (which he raised), 25 November 1898 to 22 October 1900; became Major 27 May 1899, and served in the South African War, 1899-1902, first in command of the BSA Police, and afterwards in command of the 1st Brigade, Rhodesia Field Force.  Colonel Nicholson served in the European War from 1914 holding a special appointment (graded AAG, BEF), 15 September 1914 to 23 April 1915; was Base Commandant, BEF, 24 April 1915 to 1 December 1916; was Temporary Brigadier General 2 December 1916 to 31 December 1918, and Base Commandant, British Armies in France, 2 December 1916 to 31 December 1918.  He was created a CBE in 1919.  He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 16 April 1901]; was given the Brevet of Lieutenant Colonel 29 November 1900; received the Queen's Medal with four clasps and the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a CB.  He was employed with the South African Constabulary 23 October 1932 to 7 July 1903; and 8 July 1903 to 20 August 1905, as Inspector-General.  He became Lieutenant Colonel 8 July 1903; was given the Brevet of Colonel 16 February 1905, and became Colonel 23 February 1907.  He was created a CMG in 1905.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
7th (The Queen's Own) Hussars
NicklinWilliamStaff EngineerNICKLIN, WILLIAM, Staff Engineer, Royal Navy; entered the Royal Navy in 1864, and became Engineer in 1871.  He served in the Zulu War in 1879 (Medal); in Egypt in 1882, including the bombardment of Alexandria (Medal with clasp, Bronze Star, promoted).  He became Chief Engineer in 1882, and served as Chief Engineer in the Turquoise, being present in the Eastern Sudan at the defence of Suakin in 1884; in Burma, as Chief Engineer of the Naval Brigade, at the bombardment of Minhla, the occupation of Mandalay, and at the expedition to Bhamo, 1885-86, when he was twice mentioned in Despatches, received the Medal with clasp, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 21 June 1887]: "William Nicklin, Staff Engineer, Royal Navy.  For Operations in Burma".  He became Inspector of Machinery, retiring in 1896, and lived at 20 Lion Terrace, Portsmouth.  He died on 19th April 1902.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Navy
NorrisRichard JosephCaptainNORRIS, RICHARD JOSEPH, Captain, was born 27 February 1854, youngest son of Edward Norris, who was a grandson of Jeremiah Norris, Colney Hall, Norwich, descended from a branch of the Norris family of Speke, Lancashire.  He was educated at Mount St Mary's, Derbyshire; Beaumont College, Old Windsor, and at Sandhurst, and joined the 1st West India Regiment 19 February 1871), as Second Lieutenant, becoming Lieutenant 1 December 1880, and Captain 29 January 1888.  He served in the operations in the Tambakn country, West Africa, 1892, being present at the capture of Tambi; was mentioned in Despatches, and created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 9 August 1892]: "Richard Joseph Norris, Captain, West India Regiment.  For services in West Africa".  He became Major 1 April 1894, and commanded the Karene Expedition (first phase), 1898, and Lieutenant Colonel 27 March 1902.  and retired 5 July 1905.  During the European War Lieutenant Colonel Norris served as Draft Conducting Officer, 1915-1916.  He married, in 1894, Beatrice Marion, daughter of His Excellency  Arthur van de Velde, Belgian Minister Resident, and Mine Van de Velde, of 109 Lancaster Gate, London and they had one daughter, Marion Beatrice Catharine.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
West India Regiment
NugentOliver Stewart WoodCaptainNUGENT, OLIVER STEWART WOOD, Captain, was born 9 November 1860, son of Major General St George M Nugeut and Emily, daughter of the Right Honourable Edward Litton.  He was educated at Harrow, and gazetted to the Royal Munster Fusiliers 29 July 1882, becoming Lieutenant, KRRC, 14 April 1883, and Captain, 15 October 1890.  He served in the Hazara Expedition in 1891 (Medal with clasp), and in the Miranzai Expedition, 1891, as extra Orderly Officer to the GOC; was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 15 Sept, 1891], and received a clasp.  In 1892 he served in the Isazai Expedition.  He took part in the operations in Chitral in 1895, with the Relief Force, including the storming of the Malakand Pass (slightly wounded) and the engagement at Khar.  He was mentioned in Despatches, slightly wounded; received the Medal and clasp, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 21 January 1896]: "Oliver Stewart Wood Nugent, Captain, King's Royal Rifle Corps.  In recognition of services during the recent operations in Chitral".  Captain Nugent was personally decorated by Her Majesty 3 July 1896.  He was promoted to Major 21 October 1899, and from 1899 to 1900 served in the South African War, taking part in the operations in Natal, 1899, including the action at Talana (dangerously wounded).  He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901], and received the Queen's Medal with two clasps.  He was DAAG, HQ, Ireland, 1 January 1901 to 3 October 1902; was DAQMG, 3rd Army Corps, 19 October 1902 to 10 December 1903; was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel 15 October 1906; Brevet Colonel 23 June 1909; ADC to the King 23 June 1909 to 31 December 1915; Colonel 15 October 1910; Brigade Commander, Hampshire Infantry Brigade, Southern Command, 1 January 1911 to 13 February 1914.  He served in the European War from 1914; was Commander, Humber Defences, 5 August 1914 to 5 May 1915; Brigade Commander, 41st Infantry Brigade, BEF, 6 May 1915 to 16 September 1915; Divisional Commander, 36th Division, BEF, and British Armies in France, 17 September 1915 to 1918; promoted to Major General 1 January 1916; Divisional Commander, India, 3 August 1918.  He was created a CB in 1917.  Major General O S W Nugent married, in 1899, Catharine Percy, daughter of T Evans Lees and of Mrs Lees, of Beaucroft, Wimbome, Dorset, and they had one son and two daughters.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
King's Royal Rifle Corps
NunnArthurJoshuaNUNN, JOSHUA ARTHUR, 1st Class Veterinary Surgeon, AVD, was born 10 May 1853, eldest son of Edward W Nunn, JP, DL, of Hill Castle, County Wicklow, Ireland.  He was educated at Wimbledon School, and at the Royal Veterinary College, London, and became a Barrister-at-Law, Lincoln's Inn, and Advocate, Supreme Court, Transvaal.  He was a Fellow of the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons; an FRCS, FRS Edinburgh; passed through the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons with Honours; received the Royal Agricultural Society's Prize in 1876; was Lieutenant, Royal Monmouthshire Engineer Militia, from 1871-77; Veterinary Surgeon, RA, 1877.  He served with the RA in the Afghan War, 1878-80 (Medal); was Veterinary Surgeon to the Punjab Government, 1880-85; on special duty with the Natal and Cape Governments, investigating South African horse sickness, 1886-88.  He served in the Chin-Lushai Expedition, as Principal Veterinary Officer, 1889-90, on the Indian Frontier (Medal and clasp; Despatches); served in the Zulu Rebellion in 1888; was present at the surrender of the chief Somkeli at St Lucia Lagoon; was Principal, Punjab Veterinary College, 1890-96; Deputy Inspector-General, AVD, 1901-4; PVO, Eastern Command, 1904-5; PVO, South Africa, 1905-6; Examiner in Hygiene, Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons; and in Toxicology at Liverpool University.  He was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 12 December 1890]: "Joshua Arthur Nunn, Army Veterinary Department.  In recognition of services in the Chin-Lushai Expedition".  He was created a CIE for services in Lahore Veterinary College.  Colonel Nunn married, in 1907, Gertrude Anne, widow of W Chamberlain, and widow of  E Kellner, CIE.  He wrote 'Stable Management in India'; 'Lectures on Saddlery and Harness'; a 'Report on the South African Horse Sickness'; a 'Report on South African Horses'; 'Diseases of the Mammary Gland in Domestic Animals'; 'Veterinary Toxicology' and many articles in the various professional publications on veterinary medicine and surgery.  He was Editor of the 'Veterinary Journal'.  This distinguished officer died 23 February 1908.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Army Veterinary Department
O'DonnellHughCaptainO'DONNELL, HUGH, Captain, was born 9 February 1858, at Jubbulpore, Central Provinces, India, son of John Walter O'Donnell, CE, PWD, and Rosabella O'Donnell.  He was educated privately in Germany; at Streatham School, and at the Royal Military College, Sandhurst, and began his military career 30 January 1878, as an Ensign in the 1st Battalion 8th King's Regiment In the following year he volunteered for active service in the Zulu War, and joined the 24th Regiment.  He received the South African Medal and clasp, and received a letter of thanks from the War Office through the Quartermaster-General from HRH Commanding-in-Chief: "For a sketch made by order of OC detachment of 24th Regiment of the track taken by the fugitives from Isandlwhana, 1879, from which information was gained".  In July 1880, he entered the Bengal Staff Corps, and was posted to the 44th Gurkha Rifles, and was successively Quartermaster and Adjutant of that regiment, In August 1886, he received orders to raise a Police Levy for service in Burma, and in January 1887, was appointed Commandant of Military Police for Upper Burma, and held this appointment from then to 1891.  He was with the Mogoung Field Force, 1887-88, and commanded it (under Brigadier General G B Wolseley, CB), 1888-89, for which he received mention in Despatches and the thanks of the Government of India; and was in the Tonhon Expedition of 1889-90, and with the Wuntho Field Force, 1891.  He was mentioned in Despatches by Sir George White, KCB, VC:  "For his conduct while in command of the Column operating against the rebellious Kachin tribes round and beyond Mogoung; "received the Burmese Medal with three clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 12 November 1889]: "Hugh O'Donnell, Captain, Bengal Staff Corps.  In recognition of services during  operations in Burma".  In 1892 he rejoined his old regiment, the 44th Gurkha Rifles, as Major and Second in Command.  In 1899 he was transferred, as Commandant of the 42nd Gurkha Rifles.  In 1904 he returned to his old regiment, the 44th Gurkha Rifles, now renamed the 6th Gurkha Rifles, as Commandant, and was granted a year's extension and appointed AAG, 1st Peshawar Division, then AAG for musketry to the Northern Army from 1907 to 1910.  At the end of that period he again got another extension for a year, and was appointed Colonel on the Staff; and later Brigadier General Commanding Bannu Brigade, North-West Frontier, January 1911, receiving in the same year the commendation of the Commander-in-Chief on his successful operations against the Britiani Khels, and later against the Hathi Khels.  He was Brigade Commander, January 1912, Major General, Bannu Brigade, April 1912.  He received a letter signifying the full approval from the Commander-in-Chief of the operations of the Bannu Movable Column in the Tochi Valley in April 1913.  At the Coronation Durbar at Delhi he commanded the 20th Brigade, and was invested with the CB at the Durbar by the King in person.  In 1913 he was made Colonel, 6th Gurkha Rifles.  In the Great War he commanded the Bannu Movable Column in the field in successful operations against Khostwal tribesmen, and at Spina Khaisora the enemy was driven over the frontier.  After these operations the Viceroy and Commander-in-Chief commended the able manner in which they were carried out by General O'Donnell.  Three weeks later, in February 1915, General O'Donnell was suddenly taken ill, from exposure in very inclement weather while with the Column.  He, was put on sick leave, arriving in England in April 1916.  Although he greatly improved in health, he never became fit for active service, and failed to be accepted when he offered to work in any capacity during the War.  His death occurred unexpectedly in December 1917, while on a visit to friends at Cromhall, Gloucestershire.  He was buried at Halton, Lancashire.  He had a strong and commanding personality, and his profession was his supreme interest in life.  He was an enthusiast at cricket, a fine tennis and billiard player, also a photographer in his spare time.  He married, in 1894, Susan, daughter of T G Garnett, JP, of Shefferlands, Halton, Lancashire.  She and their only son died in 1908.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Bengal Staff Corps
O'Grady-HalyRichardLieutenant ColonelO'GRADY-HALY, RICHARD HEBDEN, Lieutenant Colonel, was born 22 February 1841, at Tunbridge Wells, eldest son of General Sir William O'Grady-Haly, KCB, and of Harriette, daughter of H Hebden, of Ely Grange, Tunbridge Wells.  He was educated at the Royal Military College, Sandhurst, and joined the Army 6 November 1858.  He married in 1865, Geraldine Mary, youngest daughter of Major General Gostling, RA, and Mary, daughter of John Easpard Le Marchant, Major General (founder of Sandhurst College).  Their children were: Ethel Mary Gertrude.  Mabel Violet, (married, 1899, Robert Balmain Low, eldest son of Sir Robert Low, GCB), and Hilda Fanshawe.  General O'Grady-Haly was ADC to General Atherley in Malta, 1863; became Captain, I860; was ADC to Sir Hastings Doyle in Canada, 1870; was ADC to his father, Sir William O'Grady-Haly, in Canada, 1874-78; became Major, 1879; entered the Staff College, 1880; served with the Egyptian Expedition, 1882; Action of El Maffar; both actions at Kassassin, and Battle of Tel-el-Kebir (Despatches; Medal with clasp; Bronze Star, and Brevet of Lieutenant Colonel, 1882); with the Hazara Field Force, 1888, in command of the Second Column; was mentioned in Despatches, GGO, 978 of 88; received the Medal and clasp, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 1£ April 1889]: "For services during the operations of Hazara.  Richard O'Grady-Haly, Lieutenant Colonel and Colonel, The Suffolk Regiment".  The Insignia were presented to him by Queen Victoria.  He commanded the 1st Battalion 12th Suffolk Regiment in India; was AAG in Belfast from 1891 to 1896; he was in command of Canadian Militia, 1900 to 1902, and was in command while HRH The Duke of York made his visit to Canada.  He held the appointment, of Inspector of Warlike Stores for Canada from 1904 to 1911.  Major General O'Grady-Haly died 8 July 1911.  He was a beautiful draughtsman, and wrote several official books while at the Intelligence Department, London.  He was a good horseman and a first-class fisherman.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Suffolk Regiment
O'MalleyCharles Edward Joseph GlynnCaptainO'MALLEY, CHARLES EDWARD JOSEPH GLYNN, Captain, was born on 23 September 1882, son of Inspector-General J W J O'Malley, RN.  He was gazetted to the 6th Battalion Middlesex Regiment, and served in Burma, 1893-96.  He served in West Africa, 1897-98, with Sir F Lugard, taking part in the operations on the Niger, Lagos, and employed in the Hinterland; He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 23 May 1899], and received the Medal with clasp.  He helped to raise the West African Force.  He served in West Africa, 1900, in the operations in Ashanti, being present at the relief of Kumassi.  He was severely wounded; mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 4 November 1900], and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 15 January 1901]: "Charles Edward Joseph Glynn O'Malley, Captain, 6th Battalion, Middlesex Regiment.  In recognition of his services during the recent operations in Ashanti".  He was invested by the King 24 October 1901.  He served in the South African War, 1902, taking part in the operations in Cape Colony, April to 31 May 1902 (he received the Queen's Medal with two clasps).  He was present at the relief of Ookiep, with Colonel Cowper, CMG.  He served with the Namaqua Field Force.  Captain O'Malley, who had retired and joined the Special Reserve of Officers, died at Southsea 9 April 1910.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
(Duke of Cambridge's Own) Middlesex Regiment
OsbornPhilip BarlowLieutenantOSBORN, PHILIP BARLOW, Lieutenant, was born 16 October 1870, and joined the Oxfordshire Light Infantry as Second Lieutenant from the Militia 28 September 1892, becoming Lieutenant 9 November 1894.  He was employed in the Uganda Protectorate 18 June 1897 to 8 February 1899, and took part in the operations in Uganda in 1897-98, being present at the capture of Kabagambi (severely wounded); at the attack of Kijembo, and several other engagements.  He was mentioned in Despatches, received the Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 24 January 1899]: "Philip Barlow Osborn, Lieutenant, Oxfordshire Light Infantry.  In recognition of services during the recent operations in Uganda".  The Insignia were presented by the Queen at Osborne 1 February 1899.  He was employed in the British East African Protectorate 9 February 1899 to 17 June 1901; and served with the King's African Rifles, taking part in the operations against the Ogaden Somalis in Jubaland (Medal with clasp).  He was promoted to Captain 27 February 1900.  In East Africa, in 1902-04, he served as Base Staff Officer to 21 December 1902, took part in the operations in Somaliland and was present at the action at Jidballi.  He was mentioned in Despatches (by Lieutenant Colonel Swayne 20 February 1903; Brigadier General Manning 17 August 1903, and Sir C C Egerton 20 May 1904) [London Gazette, 2 September 1904]: was given the Brevet of Major 7 September 1904, and received two clasps.  He died 12 February 1909, and an obituary notice of him appeared in the ‘The Times'.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Oxfordshire Light Infantry
OwenEdward RodericCaptainOWEN, EDWARD RODERIC, Major, was born on 4 May 1856, at The Hewletts, Prestbury, Gloucestershire, where his father then resided, son of Hugh Darby Owen of Bettws Hall, Montgomeryshire, North Wales, and of Mrs Hugh Owen.  'Roddy' Owen was educated at a private school at Malvern, and at Eton (1869-73), and for a year with a tutor, during which time he began his riding career by winning the Duke of Beaufort's Blue Coat Race at Dauntsey on Mr E Chaplin's Holland.  He entered the Army through the Militia, receiving on the 3rd March 1875, a commission in the 2nd Battalion South Devon Infantry Militia (11th Foot).  On the 11th September 1876, he was transferred to the 1st Battalion of the 20th (East Devonshire) Regiment, which, in 1881, became known as the Lancashire Fusiliers.  He joined his new regiment at Halifax, Nova Scotia.  He shot in the Rocky Mountains; came home on leave in 1878; kept a few horses (which were trained by his elder brother Hugh at Cirencester), and rode some races.  In 1879 his regiment was stationed at Malta, and in 1881 Roddy hunted to his heart's content, and won many important races.  In 1883 he was stationed at Mhow in India, and in March 1884, was attached to the Staff of the Viceroy, Lord Ripon, as Extra ADC.  He became well known on all the race-courses in Bengal.  In August 1884, at the age of 28, he was promoted to Captain, and returned to Ireland, where he migrated from the staff of Lord Ripon to that of Lord Spencer, Lord Lieutenant of Ireland.  He won the great Sandown Steeplechase in 1884, and in two successive years he rode the winning mount in the Sandown Grand Prize.  Twice he won the great Sandown Steeple-chase on the same horse, Kilworth.  In 1899 he had the highest average of wins among gentlemen riders for the year.  In 1889 and 1900 he was ADC to General Sir Evelyn Wood at Aldershot.  In 1891 he was selected for the Mounted Infantry Regiment at Aldershot, which had been raised and was then commanded by Colonel Hutton.  In 1892 he steered Father O'Flynn to victory in the Grand National, and directly after the race he took the train to London, applied at the War Office for active service, and served as Chief of the Staff to General Sir Francis Scott, Inspector-General of the Gold Coast Constabulary; commanded the expedition against Zebus in West Africa, and left England for Lagos.  In 1892 he served with Sir Gerald Portal's Mission in Uganda.  He was chosen as Commandant of the Equatorial Provinces of Torn and Unyoro, 1893-94, during which time he quelled single-handed a Moslem revolt of a critical nature.  He was then entrusted with the important mission of planting the British flag under circumstances of extreme difficulty at Wadelai, thus safeguarding the upper reaches of the Nile for Great Britain.  He received the African Medal, 1892, the Brilliant Star of Zanzibar, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 4 January 1895]: "In recognition of services against the Zebus in 1892, and during the recent operations in Central Africa, Edward Roderic Owen, Captain and Brevet Major, The Lancashire Fusiliers".  The Insignia were presented 3 September 1895.  In the summer of 1894 he was home on leave, and in January 1905, sailed for India to join his regiment at Quetta.  He became Official Correspondent of the 'Westminster Gazette' during the North-West Frontier Campaign, and being attached to the King's Own Scottish Borderers, took part in their well-known charge.  He and Colonel Sir Younghusband were the first to enter the Fort of Chitral, after a forty-mile ride in a hostile country, in advance of the Relief Force.  Major Owen travelled in the Pamirs; joined the Sudan Expedition, receiving the Medal and the Firket Medal.  In the endeavour to stamp out cholera at Arnbigol Wells, where he was Commandant, he contracted illness and died there.  The Arabs, who loved him, placed circles of white stones round his grave.  A Memoir of him has been written by his sister, Lady Owen-Mackenzie.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Lancashire Fusiliers
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