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(456 Records)

 Surname   Forename   Rank   Notes   Unit 
BaylyAlfred William LambertCaptainBAYLY, ALFRED WILLIAM LAMBERT, Captain, was born at Paisley, 18 February 1856, youngest son of Major George Bayly, and Eliza, daughter of Lieutenant General Savage, RE.  He was educated at Wellington College, and joined the 104th Regiment 13 June 1874, and the Bombay Staff Corps 8 March 1879.  He served in the Afghan War of 1880-81, taking part in the defence and battle of Kandahar in 1880 (Medal and clasp).  He was promoted to Captain 18 June 1885, and in the same year served in the Sudan, with the Suakin Expedition, taking part in various attacks on convoys and in the operations at Tamai.  In 1885 and 1886 he was officiating DAQMG Bombay.  In 1885-87 he served in the Burma War as DAQMG; was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 2 September 1887]; received the Medal and five clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 25 November 1887]: Alfred William Lambert Bayly, Captain, Bombay Staff Corps.  Deputy Assistant Quartermaster-General, Bengal.  For services in Burma".  From the 25th November 1887 to 1892, he served in Mhow District as DAQMG In 1893 Captain Bayly passed through the Staff College, and he became Major 13 June 1894.  In 1896 he assumed command of the 126th Bombay Infantry (Baluchistan Regiment).  He served in the South African War in 1899-1900, on the Staff, and was present at the relief of Ladysmitb, including the action at Colenso; operations of 17 to 24 January 1900, and action at Spion Kop (slightly wounded); operations of 5 to 7 February 1900 and action at Vaal Kranz; operations on Tugela Heights 14 to 27 February 190O, and action at Pieter's Hill; operations in Natal, March to June 1900, including action at Laing's Nek (6 to 9 June); operations in the Transvaal east of Pretoria, August to October 1900, including actions at Lydenburg (5 to 8 September).  He was mentioned in Despatches (Sir R H Buller, 30 March and 9 November 1900) [London Gazette, 8 February 1900]; received the Queen's Medal with five clasps, and was created a CB.  He was ADC to the King in 1902-6; AAG India, 1903-4; DAG, Commandant, Indian Staff College, 1905-6; Secretary to the Government of India, Army Department, 1906-9; created a CSI, in 1909; Colonel, 126th Baluchistan Light Infantry; created a KCB in 1911; promoted to Major General 19 March 1906; retired 19 March 1912.  Sir Alfred Bayly married (1st) Ada Margaret (who died in 1880), daughter of  Major General S Thacker, Bombay; and (secondly) Eva, daughter of  John Naylor, of Leighton Hall, Montgomeryshire, and they had one son.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Bombay Staff Corps
BeattyDavidLieutenantBEATTY, DAVID, Lieutenant, Royal Navy, was born in 1871, son of Captain D L Beatty, of Borodale.  County Wexford.  He entered the Royal Navy in 1884; was employed on the Nile, in the Sudan, in co-operation with the Egyptian Army under the Sirdar, Sir H Kitchener, KCB, and rendered excellent service in getting the gunboats over the cataract.  He was second in command of the flotilla at the forcing of the Dervishes' batteries at Hafir, and exposed to a heavy fire.  He took command of the flotilla on Commander Colvin being wounded, and fought the gunboats in front of the enemy's batteries most persistently and successfully, eventually bombarding their position at Dongola and dismounting their guns.  For this service he was mentioned in Despatches and created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 17 November 1896]: "David Beatty, Lieutenant, Royal Navy.  In recognition of services during the recent operations in the Sudan".  He was mentioned in Despatches by the Sirdar for services with the gunboats employed on the Nile during the operations of 1893 in the Sudan, including the battles of Atbara and Khartoum (Medal; promoted to Commander, and awarded the 4th Class of the Order of the Medjidie, 1898).  As Commander of the Barfleur he showed exceptional tenacity in endeavouring, with 200 bluejackets, to capture the Chinese guns that caused considerable trouble to the forces and inhabitants at Tien-tsin, June 1900.  He managed to get dose to the guns, but a heavy fire therefrom necessitated withdrawing his force.  Although twice wounded, he still led his men in the attack.  He was promoted to Captain in November 1900, for these services.  On 28 April 1905, he was created an MVO, and on 5 November 1908, was appointed Aide-de-Camp to the King.  He became Rear Admiral 1 January 1910; was created a CB on the Coronation of King George V 19 June 1911.  From 8 January 1912, to February 1913, he was Naval Secretary to the First Lord of the Admiralty.  During the Naval Manoeuvres in July 1912, he was Rear Admiral commanding the Sixth Cruiser Squadron, with his flag in HMS Aboukir.  He was Rear Admiral commanding the First Cruiser Squadron from 1 March 1913, and on 22 June 1913, was created a KCB On 3 August 1914, he was promoted to Acting Vice Admiral.  Vice Admiral Sir David Beatty, in HMS Lion, commanded the force engaged with the German Squadron in Heligoland Bight on 28 August 1914, which resulted in the destruction of the German cruisers Mainz, Ariadne and Koln, and several destroyers.  Sir David Beatty also commanded the force engaged with the German battle and armoured cruisers, light cruisers and destroyers, off the Dogger Bank, 24 January 1915, when the Blucher was sunk and other vessels severely injured [London Gazette, 3 March 1915].  For his services in the Battle of Jutland Bank, 81 May 1916, Admiral Beatty was created a KCVO and was mentioned by Sir John Jellicoe in his Despatch (dated 6 July 1916): "Sir David Beatty once again showed his fine qualities of gallant leadership, firm determination, and correct strategic insight.  He appreciated the situations at once on sighting first the enemy's lighter forces, then his battle cruisers, and finally his battle fleet.  I can fully sympathize with his feelings when the evening mist and fading light robbed the Fleet of that complete victory for which he had manoeuvred and for which the vessels in company with him had striven so hard.  The services rendered by him, not only on this, but on two previous occasions, have been of the very greatest value".  Sir David Beatty was created a GCB in 1916, and a GCVO in 1917.  He commanded the Grand Fleet from 1910.  He was created an Earl in 1919.  Earl Beatty was a Grand Officer of the Legion of Honour; and he held the Order of St George of Russia (4th Class).  He married in 1901, Ethel, only daughter of Marshall Field, senior, of Chicago, and they had two sons.
GCB (mil), GCVO, OM (mil), DSO, Queen's Sudan, China 1900 (1) RofP, 1914-15 Star, BWM, VM, 1897 Jubilee, 1902 Coronation, 1935 Jubilee, Russia Order of St George 4th Class, France Croix de Guerre, Turkey Order of Medjidie 4th Class, USA DSM (Navy), Khedive Sudan (4) Khartoum Atbara Hafir (plus one other).  Queen's House, Greenwich.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Navy
BeechJohn RobertCaptainBEECH, JOHN ROBERT, Captain, was born 2 July 1860, 2nd son of James Dixon Beech, of Ballintemple, Co Cork, and Susan, daughter of John Malone, of Co Wexford.  He was educated at Newton School, Waterford.  When the Egyptian War broke out he was about 18 years old, and studying at the Edinburgh Veterinary College.  He was expecting to become a land agent, and was making a study of animals and their diseases.  He passed out top of all the students, gaining the Medal.  Being eager to get to the front, he joined the Army as a Veterinary Surgeon, the only means of entrance available to him.  He did much valuable work, buying horses and camels for the Government, and served through the Egyptian War and the Gordon Relief Expedition, and the Sudan, receiving the only seven-clasp Medal of that campaign, the clasps being: Toski, 1889; Gemaizah, 1888; Abu Klea, The Nile, 1884-85; El Teb, Tamaai, Suakin, 1884; Tel-el-Kebir.  After the Gordon Relief Expedition he went with Sir Gerald Portal on a mission from Queen Victoria to King John of Abyssinia, and carried the Queen's letter alone to King John through a most difficult and hostile country, and was given the CMG.  His DSO he got after the Battle of Toski, instead of the VC, for which he was recommended by two Generals.  His Companionship of the Distinguished Service Order was gazetted 30 May 1891: "John Robert Beech, Captain (CMG), 20th Hussars (attached to Egyptian Army)".  The Insignia, Warrant, etc, were sent to the Governor of Egypt, and presented by him 7 December 1891.  For his services after the Gordon Relief Expedition, King Edward (then Prince of Wales) recommended him for a combatant commission, and he was gazetted as Lieutenant to the 21st Lancers, and almost immediately got seven years' promotion in one day, and was appointed to the 20th Hussars as Captain (1901).  He served in the Egyptian Cavalry for many years, and on two occasions, when only 25 years of age, commanded them in most successful engagements against the Dervishes.  At 28 he married, left the Egyptian Cavalry, and rejoined the 20th Hussars.  The then Inspector-General of Cavalry, Sir Keith Fraser, singled him out for special mention when on manoeuvres, saying before the whole Cavalry Division that it was a picture to see Captain Beech at his work.  Shortly after this (1894), he sent in his papers and entered the Reserve of Officers, but rejoined for the Boer War, serving on General French's Staff, and got the Queen's Medal with five clasps.  In the Great War he was in command of a Regiment of Scottish Horse.  In addition to the Egyptian and South African Medals, he had the Osmanieh, Medjidie and the Khedive's Star and clasp.  On 1 December 1894, he married Alexandria Marion, daughter of  Kenneth Mackenzie, of Storriaway, and widow of John Bullough, of Meggerie Castle, Glen Lynn, Perthshire.  Their sons were: Clyde, born 13 April 1896 (Captain Rifle Brigade, killed 18 October 1916, aged 20); George, born 3 February 1900; Alexander Frederic Charles, born 13 April 1902, died 25 October 1905; Graham, born 25 December 1905, and Gerald, born 25 July 1908.  Lieutenant Colonel J R Beech, CMG, DSO, died at Louth, Lincolnshire, from a chill caught in camp, whilst commanding the 2/1st Scottish Horse.
CMG (b/b gold), DSO (gold), Egypt (7) Tel-El-Kebir Suakin El-Teb-Tamaii The Nile 1884-85 Abu Klea Gemaizeh 1888 Toski 1889 (1st Class Vet Surgeon) officially renamed, QSA (5) CC OFS Joh DH Belf (Capt CMG DSO RofO), 1911 Coronation, Turkey Order of Medhidie 4th Class, Turkey Order of Osmanieh 4th Class, Khedive Star (1) Tokar.  Glendining Sep 91 £3,100.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
20th Hussars
BegbieElphinstone WatersColonelBEGBIE, ELPHINSTONE WATERS, Colonel, was born at Cheltenham, 15 June 1842, fifth son of Major General P J Begbie, Madras Artillery.  He was educated at Crewkerne Grammar School; by private tuition, and at Bonn and Caimstatt, Germany, and was gazetted an Ensign in the Madras Infantry in 1859, becoming Lieutenant in 1861; Captain in 1871; Major, 1879; Lieutenant Colonel, 1885; Colonel, 1889, and Major General, 1898.  He served with the Abyssinian Expedition, 1867-68; served as Sub-Assistant Commissioner-General (Despatches [London Gazette, 30 June 1868]; Medal).  He accompanied the Duma Expedition, 1874-75; served as Superintendent of Army Signalling (mentioned in Despatches).  Joined the Burmese Expedition, 1885-86; served as Superintendent of Army Signalling (Despatches [London Gazette, 22 June 1886]; Medal with clasp).  He was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 30 May 1891]: "Elphinstone Waters Begbie, Colonel, Indian Staff Corps.  Assistant Adjutant General".  He was admitted to a Good Service Pension in 1897; attached to the Queen's Own Madras Sappers and Miners, 1871-88; Instructor in Army Signalling for Madras Presidency, 1872-88; Commandant, Bangalore Rifle Volunteers, 1880-90; AAG, Headquarters, Madras Army, 1891-94; Officiating AG, Madras Army, 1894-95; DAG, Madras Command, with rank of Brigadier General, 1895.  He was transferred to the Unemployed Supernumerary List in 1902.  He was created a CB in 1896.  Major General Begbie died 11 February 1915.
CB (mil, gold HM 1881, b/b), DSO, IGS 1854 (1) Burma 1887-8 (Lt Col Unattached), Abyssinia Medal (Lt Madras Infy).  Glendining Oct 81.  Sotheby's Nov 85 £1,600.  March Feb 86 £2,000.  Dixon Sep 92 £1,950.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Indian Staff Corps
BeleyCharles Harold HepworthCaptainBELEY, CHARLES HAROLD HEPWORTH, Captain, served in the Burma Campaign of 1885-85.  He was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 25 November 1887]: "Charles Harold Hepworth Beley, Captain, Bengal Staff Corps; Deputy Assistant Quartermaster-General, Bengal.  For services in Burma
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Bengal Staff Corps
BenbowHenryChief Inspector of MachineryBENBOW, HENRY, Chief Engineer, RN, was born in London 5 September 1838, son of James Benbow, of Thornton Heath, Surrey, and his wife, Caroline (nee Parrey); educated at a private school; entered the Royal Navy as Assistant Engineer, 1861; became Chief Engineer 1879; served in Nile Expedition for relief of General Gordon, 1884-85, being attached as Chief Engineer to the Naval Brigade, under the command of Lord Charles Beresford, in connection with river steam-boat flotilla.  The Naval Brigade did not accompany General Stewart but crossed the desert later, and was not at the Battle of Abu Klea.  A desperate effort, in which Colonel Fred Burnaby was killed, was made to save General Gordon before the fall of Khartoum.  The Expedition reached the Nile-at Gubat.  Here it was met by four little-steamers sent down by General Gordon from Khartoum.  Sir Charles Wilson, with a score of British soldiers and 266 Soudanese troops, started off at once for Khartoum in two of the steamers.  On 1 February 1885, Lieutenant Stuart Wortley brought down word that General Gordon was dead, that Khartoum had fallen, and that Sir Charles Wilson's two steamers had been wrecked thirty miles up river.  Lord Charles Beresford started to the rescue on the Salia, which had originally been a 'penny steamboat' on the Thames, with Benbow and a crew of bluejackets, a few picked soldier marksmen, two Gardner guns, and two brass four-pounder Egyptian mountain guns on board.  The Sana was old, and could only make two and a half knots per hour against the stream.  The following morning they had to pass the fort of Wad-el-Habeshi, where three heavy Krupp guns were-mounted, with 5,000 dervishes well entrenched, while a quarter of a mile-further on could be seen the wreck of one of Sir Charles Wilson's steamers, and the island on which he and his men had taken refuge.  By concentrating machine-gun fire on the embrasures, they ran the gauntlet, and had passed some two hundred yards up stream, when a shot from the fort pierced the crazy vessel's boiler, killing or scalding all the engine-room hands, except one leading stoker, Royal Navy.  The way on the boat enabled it to be headed across and anchored on the opposite shore.  Although the dash across the desert had been carried out in the lightest possible order, Chief Engineer Benbow had brought with him the necessary plates, bolts, nuts, tools, etc, for dealing with such an emergency.  With his own.  hands he cut out and bent a new plate, sixteen inches by fourteen inches, drilled the holes, cut the threads of the screws on bolts and nuts, and after some ten hours' work standing in water, he was able to report that the job was done.  During all this time bullets pattered continually on the hull, some of them piercing it and striking the wounded who lay below, and any moment a shell might have burst into the engine-room.  At 5 am the fires were lit with the utmost caution and steam got up.  The guns of the fort were safely eluded, Sir Charles Wilson's party picked up, and the whole-expedition brought back to Gubat.  The plate is now in the Museum of the Royal Naval College, Greenwich, having been cut out and sent home-some fifteen years later by Lord Kitchener.  In his official report, Lord Charles Beresford stated: "Too much credit cannot be given to this, officer".  Lord Charles Beresford, in his Memoirs, writes: "He ought to have received the VC, but owing to the fact that I did not know that the decoration could be granted for a service of that nature, I did not, to my great regret, recommend him for that honour".  On the return to Korti, Mr Benbow was specially complimented on parade for his skill and bravery by Lord Wolseley, who presented him with his cigarette-case.  Sent to England shortly after to prepare special light-draft steamers.  Specially mentioned by Lord Wolseley in Despatches; received the Medal and clasp, and Khedive's Bronze Star.  On the discussion of the Naval Estimates in the House of Commons in 1885, Lord (then Sir Thomas) Brassey, Secretary to the Admiralty, stated: "I particularly desire to place on record the services rendered by the Naval Engineer, Mr Benbow".  Promoted to be Inspector of Machinery, "for gallantry in action during  operations, in Egypt" [Gazette, 13 June 1886]; Chief Inspector of Machinery, 1888.  He was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 30 May 1891]: "Henry Benbow, Chief Inspector of Machinery, Royal Navy".  Insignia presented by the Queen, 17 August 1891.  Sir Henry Benbow married, 1892, Elizabeth Jean, only daughter of Henry Bird, of Uxbridge, and their only child was a daughter, Muriel Caroline.  He was created a KCB (Military), 26 June 1902.  Sir Henry Benbow KCB, DSO, died 20 October 1916.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Navy
BennettWilliamColonelBENNETT, WILLIAM, Colonel, was born 15 November 1835, at Athlone, Ireland, eldest son of Captain Thomas Bennett, 14th Hussars, and of Winifred Bennett, daughter of  N Keatinge.  He was educated at private schools, and joined the 1st Battalion 19th Foot in India, as Ensign, in 1858, the battalion in which he afterwards served for 32 years.  Shortly afterwards he passed in Hindustani, and was appointed Regimental Interpreter.  In 1862 he obtained a first-class certificate at the School of Musketry, Hythe, and held the appointment of Instructor of Musketry to the 3rd Depot Battalion at Chatham, and afterwards to his regiment.  He took part in the Hazara Campaign, North-West Frontier of India, including the expedition against the Black Mountain Tribes, 1868 (Medal with clasp).  He married, in 1869, Belinda, daughter of William Rosher, of Woodfield, Northfleet, Kent.  He was promoted Captain in 1871, and in July 1877, returned to Hythe as Captain Instructor at the school, and was appointed DAAG for Musketry at Aldershot 1 March 1878, remaining in that position until, on getting his majority in 1881, he rejoined the Yorkshire Regt, at Halifax, Nova Scotia.  When on the Staff at Aldershot, he founded in 1878 the Annual Aldershot Rifle Meeting.  Colonel Bennett always took a keen interest in shooting, being himself one of the best shots in the Army, and the winner of many important trophies in the matches of the Northern Indian Rifle Association, as well as a successful big game shot in Kashmir.  An instance of his fine marksmanship in target-shooting was witnessed one day on the rifle range when, as Regimental Musketry Instructor, he was endeavouring to train a batch of third-class shots to make the best of the very inferior Lee-Enfield rifles which were at that time issued to the battalions in India.  One of the men, after several tries, failed altogether to get a single shot on the target.  "How is it, Private Atkins, that you are shooting so badly?" inquired the instructor.  "Well, sir", said the man, "I think this 'ere rifle is a very bad one; I can't make nothing of it".  Captain Bennett took the rifle from the man with his right hand only, put it to his shoulder, and without touching it at all with his other hand, aimed at the target, and immediately made a bull's-eye.  "I do not think there is much fault to be found with that rifle", he remarked to the greatly surprised Mr Atkins.  After much 'testing', those rifles were ultimately changed for a superior make, with the result that the shooting of the regiment was so good the next year (1871) as to draw forth the following favourable remarks from the Commander-in-Chief in India: "The shooting is excellent, and evinces a degree of care in the performance of the annual course of musketry which is very creditable to the battalion.  The exertions of the Officer Instructors, Captain Bennett and Lieutenant Emerson, have been reported to His Excellency as being worthy of special commendation, an expression of which Lord Napier of Magdala accordingly desires may be communicated to those officers".  As Major he served in the Nile Expedition of 1884-5 (Medal and clasp; Bronze Star); was promoted Lieutenant Colonel in 1885; served in the Sudan, 1885-6.  He commanded the 1st Battalion Yorkshire Regiment in the action of Ginniss; was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 26 November 1886]: "For action at Ginniss, William Bennett, Colonel, Yorkshire Regiment".  Mentioned in Despatches.  He retired as full Colonel in 1890, After 22 years on the retired list, during which time, being very fond of travelling, Colonel Bennett visited the Holy Land and many parts of Europe and North Africa, he died of pneumonia and heart failure on 2 August 1912, at Whitby, Yorkshire, aged 76.
DSO (gold), IGS 1854 (1) NWF (Lt 1st Btn HM's 19th Regt), Egypt (1) The Nile 1884-5 (Lt Col 1st Yorks Regt), Khedive Star.  DNW Sep 00 £4,500.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
(Princess of Wales's Own) Yorkshire Regiment
BeynonWilliam George LaurenceLieutenantBEYNON, WILLIAM GEORGE LAURENCE, Lieutenant, was born at Agra, India, 5 November 1860, son of General W H Beynon, of 25 Ashburn Place, London, and Charlotte, daughter of Lieutenant General Sir G St Patrick Laurence, KCSI, CB.  He was educated at Marlborough, and Sandhurst Royal Military College; joined the 2nd Battalion Royal Sussex Regiment as Second Lieutenant 5 February 1887.  He served in the Black Mountain Expedition, 1888 (Medal and clasp); became Lieutenant, Indian Staff Corps, 11 December 1889.  He served as Staff Officer to Colonel Kelly in the Gilgit Field Force; in the Siege of Chitral 1895; was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 16 July 1895], received the Medal and clasp, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 10 July 1895]: "In recognition of services during the recent operations in Chitral, William George Laurence Beynon, Lieutenant, Indian Staff Corps".  The Insignia were presented 7 November 1895.  He served in the Hazara Campaign, North-West Frontier of India, 1897-98.  Operations in Samana and in the Kurram Valley during August and September 1897.  Relief of Gulistan (two clasps).  He again saw active service in the Tirah Campaign, 1897-98, being present at the actions of Chagra Kotal and Dargai, and capture of the Sampagha and Arhanga Passes.  Reconnaissance of the Saran Sar and action of 2 November 1897.  Operations in and around Dwatoi and action of 24 November 1897.  Operations in the Bara Valley 7-14 December 1897.  Affair at Shinkamar on 29 January 1898.  He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 1 March 1898]; was given the Brevet of Major 20 May 1898, and received a clasp.  He served in the Somaliland Expedition in 1901 in command of the Mounted troops; was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 18 April 1902], received the Medal and clasp, and the Brevet of Lieutenant Colonel on attaining substantive Majority.  He served in Tibet in 1904 as DAQMG; was present at the action of Niani, and at the operations in and around Gyantse.  He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 13 December 1904]; received the Medal and clasp, and the Brevet of Lieutenant Colonel 10 November 1904.  He became Major 5 February 1905; was given the Brevet of Colonel 10 November 1910; became Colonel, 1 January 1911; served in the Abor Expedition, 1911-12.  He served in the European War from 1915; was Brigade Commander (Colonel on Staff), India, 2 November 1914 to 6 May 1917; Brigade Commander, India, 1 September 1917 to 14 June 1918; Divisional Commander, India, 15 June 1918; was promoted to Major General 1 January 1917.  He was created a CB in 1915; a CIE in 1910, and a KCIE in 1917, and mentioned in Despatches in 1916.  Sir William Beynon married, in 1898, Edith Norah, youngest daughter of George Petrie, of 1 De Vere Gardens, London, and they had three daughters.  He wrote 'With Kelly to Chitral'. 
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Indian Staff Corps
BiggsHenry VeroCaptainBIGGS, HENRY VERO, Captain, was born at Belgaum 9 May 1860, third son of Colonel Thomas Biggs, RA (previously of the Bombay Artillery, who died in 1905), and Mary, daughter of  Reverend W Beynon.  He was educated first at a private school at Clifton, and passed into the RMA, Woolwich, 1877; joined the RE 30 July 1879; embarked for India, 1882, and was posted to the Bombay S and M; spent nearly three years on the Afghan Frontier (including the 1884 Zhob Expedition); served in the third Burmese War, 1885-87 (Medal with clasp); joined the Military Works from the S and M, 1887.  He became Captain, 1889; Adjutant, RE, Tirah Expeditionary Force, 1897-98; operations on the NW Frontier, 1897; operations in the Kurram and on the Samana, the Chagru Kotal, capture of the Sampagha Pass and operations in the Khyber.  He was mentioned in Despatches, received the Medal with three clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 20 May 1898]: "Henry Vero Biggs, Captain, Royal Engineers.  In recognition of services on the North-West Frontier of India".  He became Major, 1898; Lieutenant Colonel, 1905; officiated AAG, RE, India, 1906; Brevet Colonel, 1908; commanded RE, 5th (Mhow) Division, 1906-7, 6th (Poona) and 2nd (Rawalpindi) Division, 1909-12; became Colonel 27 May 1912; retired, Military Works, India (Royal Engineers), 29 November 1912; re-employed on account of war, 1914 (Despatches [London Gazette, 24 February 1917]).  Colonel Bigg's favourite recreations were fishing and shooting, especially the big game of India.  He married, October 1887, at Kasauli, India, Frances Kate, eldest daughter of  Colonel C H Ewart, BSC, and they have one son, Henry Ewart Biggs (born 28 June 1893, at Secunderabad, India).
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Engineers
BishopFrederickCaptainBISHOP, FREDERICK EDWARD, Captain, was born at Secunderabad, Deccan, 23 March 1872, son of Lieutenant Colonel F F R Bishop, Indian Staff Corps, and of Ellen, daughter of  Reverend E Symms, of Ringmer, Sussex.  He was educated privately, and was gazetted to the 3rd Battalion Bedfordshire Regiment in 1891, and was seconded for service under the Colonial Office, as Assistant Inspector, Gold Coast Constabulary, 29 May 1896.  He became Captain, 1st Battalion Gold Coast Regiment, West African Frontier Force, 1900; served in Ashanti, 1900; was left in command of the Fort of Kumasi when it was evacuated by the Garrison on the 23rd of June 1900, until it was relieved by Colonel Sir James Willcocks, KCMG, DSO on the 15th July.  Captain Bishop was slightly wounded, mentioned in Despatches 4 December 1900, and received the Medal and clasp.  He was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 15 January 1901]: "Frederick Bishop, Captain, 3rd Battalion Bedfordshire Regiment.  In recognition of services during the recent operations in Ashanti".  The Insignia were presented by the King 25 July 1901.  He was appointed Travelling Commissioner, Northern Territories, Gold Coast, 1906, and invalided from the Colonial Service in 1908.  He served in  European War from August 1914, till May 1917, with the 3rd and 9th Battalions Bedfordshire Regiment, and at the Depot, Middlesex Regiment Captain Bishop married, in 1909, Julia Ethel, daughter of Bromley Symons.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Bedfordshire Regiment
BlakeneyRobert Byron DruryLieutenantBLAKENEY, ROBERT BYRON DRURY, Lieutenant, was born 18 April 1872, at Mitcham, Surrey, son of William Blakeney, Paymaster-in-Chief, RN, of Hillsborough, Westward Ho!  He entered the Royal Engineers 24 July 1891; became Lieutenant 24 July 1894; was specially employed with the Egyptian Army 13 April 1896 to 9 October 1896, and employed with the Egyptian Army 10 October 1896 to 22 April 1899.  He served in the Expedition to Dongola in 1896, taking part in the operations of 19 September.  He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 3 November 18961, and received the Egyptian Medal with clasp.  He served in the Nile Expedition of 1897 (clasp to Egyptian Medal), and in the Nile Expedition of 1898, when he was present at the Battle of Khartoum; was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 30 September 1898]; received the Medal and a clasp to the Egyptian Medal, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 15 November 1898]: "Robert Byron Drury Blakeney, Lieutenant, Royal Engineers.  In recognition of services during the recent operations in Egypt and the Sudan, including the Battle of Khartoum".  (The Insignia presented by the Queen at Windsor 12 January 1899.) He was on special extra-regimental employment 23 April 1899 to 24 January 1900, in command of the 3rd Balloon Section, South African War, 1900-1; was DAD Railways, South Africa, 1 July 1900 to 17 June 1901; took part in the operations in Orange River Colony and Cape Colony, 1900.  He was on extra-regimental employment, 18 June 1901.  He was given the Third Class Osmanieh, 1905; was Deputy General Manager, Egyptian State Railways, 1906-13; became Major 24 July 1911; received the Second Class Medjidie, 1912; retired from the Army 4 February 1914.  Major Blakeney served in the operations on the Suez Canal, 1914-15; was present at the action of 2 February, and mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 21 June 1916].  He served in the Dardanelles Expedition as AD, Railway Transport, and Temporary Lieutenant Colonel, and served in the Egyptian Expeditionary Force, 1915, 1916, 1917 and 1918, as Deputy Director of Railway Traffic.  He received the Order of the Nile, Second Class, 1916; was present at preliminary operations round Gaza 29 and 30 October 1917.  Four times mentioned in Despatches; CMG, 3 June 1918; Director of Railway Traffic, EEF, 8 April 1919, with temporary rank of Brigadier General; General Manager, Egyptian State Railways, 1 April 1919.  Major Blakeney married, 6 May 1903, Dorothy, daughter of  Major Nelson Ellis, 101st Royal Munster Fusiliers, and they had two sons and one daughter.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Engineers
BlenkinsopLayton JohnCaptainBLENKINSOP, LAYTON JOHN, Captain, was born 27 June 1862, third son of Lieutenant Colonel William Blenkinsop and Elizabeth, daughter of William Sandford.  He was educated at King's School, Canterbury, and at the Royal Veterinary College, London, and was Coleman Medallist, 1883.  He entered the Army Veterinary Department, 1883; was Advising Veterinary Surgeon to the Punjab Government, and Professor at Lahore Veterinary College, 1891-93; was SVO for British troops, Sudan Expedition, 1898 (Despatches; Egyptian Medal with clasp; English Medal; created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 15 November 1898]: "Layton John Blenkinsop, Captain, Army Veterinary Department.  In recognition of services during the recent operations in Egypt and the Sudan, including the Battle of Khartoum".  Insignia sent to GOC, Egypt, and presented by him, 20 December 1898, at a full-dress parade of the Cairo Garrison).  He was Senior Veterinary Officer in Egypt, 1896-99; served in South Africa, 1899-1902, as SVO, Cavalry Division, under Lieutenant-General Sir J D F French, until September 1901, and SVO Remounts in South Africa to December 1902 (Despatches; South African Medal with six clasps; King's Medal with two clasps; promoted Major); became Lieutenant-Colonel, AVC, 15 March 1903; Principal Veterinary Officer, 3rd Army Corps, and PVO, Irish Command, 19 April 1904 to 3 August 1906.  He was Principal Veterinary Officer, South Africa, 2 September 1906 to 24 November 1909; became Colonel 15 March 1908; was Principal Veterinary Officer, Northern Command, 22 February 1910 to 20 April 1910; Principal Veterinary Officer, Southern Command, 20 April 1910 to 31 December 1912, and Assistant Director of Veterinary Services, Aldershot Command, 1 January 1913 to 1 January 1914.  Colonel Blenkinsop became Inspecting Veterinary Officer, India, 8 February 1914, and Director, Veterinary Service in India, with rank of Brigadier General, on 24 July 1916, and on the 1st December 1918, was appointed Director General, Army Veterinary Service, War Office, with rank of Major General.  He was made a Fellow of the Royal Geographical Society in 1905.  He married, 1905, Ethel Alice, daughter of John Wells, JP, Booth Ferry House, Goole, Yorkshire.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Army Veterinary Department
BlomfieldCharles JamesColonelBLOMFIELD, CHARLES JAMES, Colonel, was horn at Bow, Devonshire, 26 May 1855, second son of the Reverend George J Blomfield, Rector of Aldington, Kent, and Isabel, daughter of  Right Reverend Charles James Blomfield, Lord Bishop of London.  He was educated at Haileyhury, and the Royal Military College, Sandhurst; entered the Army as Sub-Lieutenant (unattached) 11 February 1875; 20th Foot 11 February 1875; for 1st Class at Royal Military College, became Lieutenant, 20th Foot, 11 February 1875; was Adjutant, Lancashire Fusiliers, 27 August 1880 to 20 November 1883; Captain, Lancashire Fusiliers, 1 July 1881.  He married, 18 August 1881, in Dublin, Henriette Elizabeth Briscoe, daughter of Major E Briscoe (The Lancashire Fusiliers), and their sons were: Myles Aldington Blomfield, Commander, Royal Navy (born in 1885), and Patrick Valentine Blomfield, Lieutenant, 2nd Lancers, Indian Army (born 1893).  He was Adjutant, Auxiliary Forces, 18 January 1884 to 17 January 1889; became Major 31 July 1890; was Acting Military Secretary to His Excellency the Commander-in-Chief, Bombay Army, in 1891; DAAG, Bombay, 27 October 1892 to 9 January 1897; AAG, India, 10 January 1897 to 31 December 1897.  He became Lieutenant Colonel 15 October 1898; served in the Sudan Expedition in 1898; was present at the Battle of Khartoum; was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 30 September 1898]; received the Egyptian Medal with clasp, and the Queen's Medal, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 15 November 1898]: "Charles James Blomfield, Colonel, The Lancashire Fusiliers.  In recognition of services during the recent operations in the Sudan".  The Insignia, Warrant and Statutes were sent to the GOC, Gibraltar and presented by him 15 December 1898.  He was in command of the 2nd Lancashire Fusiliers from December 1899 to 27 October 1900; commanded 2nd Lancashire Fusiliers in the South African War, 1899-1902; was with the Ladysmith Relief Force in the operations of 17 to 24 January 1900, and was severely wounded at Spion Kop.
Sir A Conan Doyle says, on pages 196 and 197 of 'The Great Boer War': "By the morning of January 22 the regiments were clustering thickly all round the edges of the Boer main position, and the day was spent in resting the weary men and in determining at what point the final assault should be delivered.  On the right front, commanding the Boer lines on either side, towered the stark, eminence of Spion Kop, so called because from its summit the Boer voortrekkers had first in 1835 gazed down upon the promised land of Natal.  If that could only be seized and held!  Buller and Warren swept its bald summit with their field-glasses.  It was a venture.  But all war is a venture; and the brave man is he who ventures most.  One fiery rush and the master-key of all these locked doors might be in our keeping.  That evening there came a telegram to London which left the whole empire in a hush of anticipation.  Spion Kop was to be attacked that night.  The troops which were selected for the task were eight companies of the 2nd Lancashire Fusiliers, six of the 2nd Royal Lancasters, two of the 1st South Lancashires, 180 of Thorneycroft's, and half a company of Sappers.  It was to be a North of England job.  Under the friendly cover of a starless night the men, in Indian file, like a party of Iroquois braves upon the war-trail, stole up the winding and ill-defined path which led to the summit.  Woodgate, the Lancashire brigadier, and Blomfield of the Fusiliers, led the way.  It was a severe climb of 2,000 feet, coming after arduous work over broken ground, but the affair was well timed, and it was at that blackest hour which precedes the dawn that the last steep ascent was reached.  The Fusiliers crouched down among the rocks to recover their breath, and saw far down in the plain beneath them the placid lights which showed where their comrades were resting.  A fine rain was falling, and rolling clouds hung low over their heads.  The men with unloaded rifles and fixed bayonets stole on once more, their bodies bent, their eyes peering through the mirk for the first sign of the enemy—that enemy whose first sign has usually been a shattering volley.  Thorneycroft's men with their gallant leader had threaded their way up into the advance.  Then the leading files found that they were walking on the level.  The crest had been gained.  With slow steps and bated breath the open line of skirmishers stole across it,.  Was it possible that it had been entirely abandoned? Suddenly a raucous shout of 'Wie da?' came out of the darkness, then a shot, then a splutter of musketry and a yell, as the Fusiliers sprang onwards with their bayonets.  The Boer post of Vryheid burghers clattered and scrambled away into the darkness, and a cheer that roused both the sleeping armies told that the surprise had been complete and the position won.  In the grey light of the breaking day the men advanced along the narrow, undulating ridge, the prominent end of which they had captured.  Another trench faced them, but it was weakly held and abandoned.  Then the men, uncertain what remained beyond, halted and waited for full light to see where they were, and what the work was which lay before them—a fatal halt, as the result proved, and yet one so natural that it is hard to blame the officer who ordered it.  Indeed, he might have seemed more culpable had he pushed blindly on, and so lost the advantage which had been already gained".  Sir A Conan Doyle goes on to describe the action at Spion Kop, and says that "the losses in the action were very heavy, not fewer than fifteen hundred being killed, wounded or missing, the proportion of killed, being, on account of the shell fire, abnormally high.  The Lancashire Fusiliers were the heaviest sufferers, and their Colonel, Blomfield, was wounded, and fell into the hands of the enemy".  Colonel Blomfield took part in the operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, 30 November 1900 to 31 May 1902 (was Colonel on the Staff to command District in 1900, and in command of columns); operations on the Zululand Frontier of Natal in September 1901; was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 8 February 1931 and 23 July 1902], and received the Brevet of Colonel 29 November 1900, the Queen's Medal with four clasps, and the King's Medal with two clasps.  He became Colonel 24 June 1902; was Colonel on the Staff, commanding Harrismith and Natal Sub-District, South Africa, from 24 June 1902 to 29 June 1906; was created a CB in 1906; became Major General 12 February 1907; was GOC, Wessex Division, Southern Command, from 1 January 1909 to 9 February 1911; commanded Mhow Division, India, from 3 March 1911 to November 1912; commanded the Peshawar Division from 1913 to 25 June 1915, and a Division, Territorial Force, from November 1915 to July 1917.  Major General C J Bomfield, CB, DSO, was placed on the retired list on account of having attained the age limit 18 July 1917.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Lancashire Fusiliers
BondEdmund EdwardEngineer CaptainHe was born on 19 October 1865, son of Edmund and Sarah Bond.  He was educated at the Royal Naval Engineering College, Devonport, and entered the Royal Navy 1 July 1887; served in the Nile Campaign, 1898-99; from 1900 to 1914 was Director of Steamers Department, Sudan Government, in charge of gunboats, transport steamers, and other Government craft in the Upper Nile, from the Sixth Cataract (Assuan) to the Lakes (Uganda).  Attached to Egyptian Army with successive ranks of Bimbashi, Kaimakam, Miralai and Lewa.  He received the British and Egyptian Medals and one clasp; the Medjidie, Fourth Class; and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 15 November 1898]: "Edmund Edward Bond, Engineer Captain, Royal Navy.  In recognition of services in Egypt and the Sudan, including the Battle of Khartoum".  Supervised reconstruction of three twin-screw gunboats sent out from England in parts, at Abodieh, near Berber, April to July 1898.  Acted as Supervising Engineer of flotilla in the operations up to Battle of Omdurman and subsequent defeat of the Khalifa, 1899.  The Insignia were sent to the GOC, Egypt, and presented by the Duke of Connaught at Omdurman 19 February 1899.  He was specially promoted Chief Engineer 2 March 1900; became Engineer-Commander 2 March 1904.  and retired August 1907.  He received other decorations for his services, these being the Third Class Osmanieh in 1907; a Companionship of St Michael and St George in 1913, and the Order of the Medjidie (Second Class) in 1914.  He was appointed Engineer Commander, HMS Brilliant, August 1914; present in operations on Belgian coast in October 1914; from April 1915, to July 1919, on special service in connection with construction of light-draught gunboats, and as Engineer Overseer, Manchester; Acting Engineer Captain, January 1917; retired with rank of Engineer Captain, July 1919.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Navy
BorradaileHarry BennCaptainBORRADAILE, HARRY BENN, Captain and Brevet-Major, was born 4 October 1860, son of Harry Borradaile, Bombay Civil Service, and of Mrs Harry Borradaile.  He was educated at Charterhouse, and was gazetted to the 25th Foot as Lieutenant 15 January 1880, becoming Lieutenant, King's Own Scottish Borderers, 26 April 1881.  He served in the Burmese Expedition of 1885-89 (Medal and two clasps), and in the Sikkim Expedition, 1889; promoted to Captain 14 January 1891, and given the Brevet of Major 10 July 1895.  In 1895 he took part in the operations in Chitral, serving with the relief force from Gilgit.  He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 16 July 1895]; was given the Brevet of Major 10 July 1895; received the Medal and clasp, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 16 July 1895]: "Harry Benn Borradaile, Captain and Brevet Major, Indian Staff Corps.  In recognition of services during the operations in Chitral".  The Insignia were presented 9 November 1895.  He became Major, Indian Army 14 January 1900; commanded the 34th Sikh Pioneers, 1902-09; was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel 1 June 1904, and given the Brevet of Colonel 8 June 1907; he became Colonel 1 January 1911; retired 30 December 1912.  He served in the European War; was wounded and given the honorary rank of Brigadier General 12 June 1919.  Brigadier General H B Borradaile married, in 1890, Florence, only child of H Soden, and they had one son and three daughters.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Indian Staff Corps
BorrowFrederick RonaldCaptainHe joined the 81st Foot 8 December 1877; served with his regiment in the Afghan War of 1878-79, and was present at the capture of Ali Masjid (Medal and clasp). He became Lieutenant 6 March 1880, and again saw active service in the Nile Expedition of 1884-85, in the Egyptian Army (Medal with clasp and Khedive's Star). Also served in the operations of the Sudan Frontier Force in 1885-87, including the investment of Kosheh and the engagements at Ginniss and Sarras. He was mentioned in Despatches, received the 4th Class of the Osmanieh, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 26 November 1886]: "Frederick Ronald Borrow, Captain, North Lancashire Regiment. For the Action at Ginniss". He had been promoted to Captain 28 March 1886. He was mentioned again in Despatches for the action at Sarras, and received the 3rd Class of the Medjidie. A further account of Captain Borrow's services is given in this book in the account of Sir Leslie Rundle. Captain Borrow died at Winchester 11 December 1892.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Loyal North Lancashire Regiment
BourkeHenry BeresfordCaptainHe was born 12 June 1855, son of the Reverend John Bourke and Louisa Maria, daughter of James Potts; and was a grandson of the 3rd Earl of Mayo. He was educated at Sherbourne School, and entered the 1st West India Regiment on 30 November 1876. He was Acting Fort Adjutant, Cape Coast Castle, 28 April 1892 to 30 May 1892, and became Captain 5 October 1887. He served in the Tambaka Expedition in 1892, and was present at the capture of Tambi (Medal and clasp). He took part in the operations against the Sofas, West Coast of Africa, in 1893-94; was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 28 February 1894], and created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 8 June 1894]: "Henry Beresford Bourke, Captain, West India Regiment. In recognition of services during the recent operations on the West Coast of Africa". The Insignia, etc, were sent to Captain Bourke 28 June 1894. He became Major 1 April 1894, and Lieutenant Colonel 28 March 1898; operations Sierra Leone; Karene Expedition, 1898-99 (clasp). Retired 9 May 1903. Lieutenant Colonel H B Bourke served during the European War as Draft Conducting Officer.


Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
West India Regiment
BowdenWalterSurgeonBOWDEN, WALTER, Surgeon, Royal Navy, was born in London, 10 June 1859, son of William Bowden, of 45 Hilldrop Crescent, Camden Road, London.  He was educated at University College Hospital, London (MRCS, England, and LRCP, London, 1886); entered the Royal Naval Medical Service in 1887; became Staff Surgeon in 1899; served during operations against Fodey Silah on the Gambia in 1894, in medical charge; was present at the destruction of Busimballa, action of Sabages, and with the Naval Brigade at the bombardment of Gunpur in 1894.  He was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order ("London Gazette, 26 May 1894]: "Walter Bowden, Surgeon, Royal Navy.  In recognition of services against Fodey Silah, in Combo, on the Gambia".  The Insignia were sent to the Admiralty, and presented 6 July 1894; he also received the General African Medal and Gambia Clasp, the South African Medal, 1901-2, and the Somaliland Medal.  He married Alithea M, daughter of J Ogilvie, JP, of Queenstown, Ireland, and they had two sons and two daughters.  He became Staff Surgeon in 1900, and retired in 1908 as Deputy Inspector-General.  The following are fuller details of his war services: Whilst Surgeon of HMS Raleigh he served in the Naval Brigade at Bathurst, on the River Gambia, West Coast of Africa, in February 1894, in co-operation with two companies of the 1st West India Regiment, for the punishment of Fodey Silah, a rebellious slave-raiding chief; was in medical charge of the Royal Marines: volunteered to take charge of the ammunition; especially recommended and mentioned in Despatches; was present in medical charge at the bombardment and occupation of Gunjur in 1894; he was appointed to the Distinguished Service Order, and granted a Medal with clasp.  He was the first Naval Medical Officer to receive the distinction of Companionship of the DSO.  He served in HMS Naiad during the Boer War and Somaliland Expedition, 1901 to 1904.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Navy
BowkerWilliam JamesLieutenantBOWKER, WILLIAM JAMES, Lieutenant, was born 8 June 1809, son of Frederick Bowker, of Lankhills, Barrister, of Lincoln's Inn; Livery Skinners' Company. He entered Prince Albert's Somerset Light Infantry 21 December 1889, and became Lieutenant 14 June 1892. He served in West Africa in 1898, taking part in the operations in the Niger Territories, including the Illah and Siama Expeditions. He was mentioned in Despatches, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 30 June, 1899]: "William James Bowker, Lieutenant, Somerset Light Infantry. In recognition of services during the recent operations in West Africa". The Insignia were kept by the Foreign Office until Captain Bowker's return from East Africa. The DSO was presented to him by the King 24 October 1902. (This is the first entry of a presentation by King Edward VII). Lieutenant Bowker was promoted to Captain 2 August 1899, and served in South Africa from 1899 to 1902, taking part in the operations in Natal in 1899. Relief of Ladysmith, including operations of 17 to 24 January 1900 and action at Spion Kop; operations of 5 to 7 February 1900, and action at Vaal Kranz; operations on Tugela Heights (14 to 27 February 1900). Operations in the Orange Free State, April to May, 1900. Operations in the Transvaal, in June 1900. Operations in Natal, March to April 1900. Operations in the Transvaal, west of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900. Operations in Cape Colony, north of Orange River, in 1900. Operations in the Transvaal, April 1901 to May 1902. Operations in Orange River Colony, June and July 1901 (Queen's Medal with five clasps; King's Medal with two clasps). He became Major 26 June, 1909. Major Bowker served in the European War from 1914. From October 1915 to May, 1917, he was Temporary Lieutenant Colonel, and from 5 May 1917 to 31 August 1917, he was Brigade-Commander, 231st Infantry Brigade, Egyptian Expeditionary Force. From 12 February 1918 to 30 June 1918, he commanded the 230th Infantry Brigade, Egyptian Expeditionary Force, and later, British Armies in France. He became Lieutenant Colonel 21 April, 1918; was mentioned in Despatches, and created a CMG in 1916, for services in the war.


Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
(Prince Albert's) Somerset Light Infantry
BrakeHerbert Edward JohnCaptainBRAKE, HERBERT EDWARD JOHN, Captain, was born at Melksham, Wiltshire, 9 February 1866, only son of Surgeon General Brake, IMS.  He was educated at Westward Ho! and joined the Royal Artillery as Lieutenant 18 February 1886.  He served on the Punjab Frontier of India, 1887 to 1896, and was promoted to Captain 1 November 1896.  Captain Brake was employed in the British Central African Protectorate 24 July 1897 to 1 December 1898, taking part in the expedition against the Mpezeni.  He was mentioned in Despatches; received the Medal with clasp, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 3 October 1899]: "Herbert Edward John Brake, Captain, Royal Artillery.  In recognition of services during the recent operations in Uganda and Dutch Central Africa".  The Insignia, etc, were sent to the Officer Commanding, Mauritius, who transferred the DSO to the GOC, Aden.  Temporary Lieutenant Colonel H E J Brake acknowledged receipt of the Insignia, etc, 6 May 1900, forwarded to him by Officer Commanding the Troops, Mauritius.  No official presentation was possible.  Colonel Brake served in West Africa 1 January 1899 to 2 August 1902, with the King's African Rifles, taking part in the operations in Ashanti.  He was slightly wounded; was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 8 March 1901], and was given the Brevet of Major 29 November 1900.  He was specially employed in West Africa in 1900, commanding the Field Force up the Gambia, and the operations against Fodi Kabba 29 December 1900 to 4 June 1901.  He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; received the Medal with clasp and was created a CB in 1901.  He raised the 2nd Battalion King's African Rifles, and commanded it 1 January 1899 to 2 August 1902.  He was Commandant of the Local Forces, and Inspector-General of Police, Trinidad, 17 September 1902 to 16 September 1907.  He was promoted Major 6 January 1905.  He served in the European War from 1914; was promoted Lieutenant Colonel 30 October 1914, and given the Brevet of Colonel 1 January 1916; was Brigadier General, Royal Artillery, Heavy Artillery, 18th Army Corps, British Armies in France, 15 January 1917 to 2 April 1918; Commandant, Heavy Artillery, Training Centre, Forces in Great Britain, from 1 June 1918.  He was created a CMG in 1918.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Artillery
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