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(1167 Records)

 Surname   Forename   Rank   Notes   Unit 
JeffcoatAlgernon CautleyLieutenantJEFFCOAT, ALGERNON CAUTLEY, Lieutenant, was born 14 August 1877, youngest son of Deputy Surgeon General J H Jeffcoat, of 12 Avenue Elmers, Surbiton. He was educated at Rugby and at the Royal Military College, Sandhurst, and entered the Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers 8 September 1897, becoming Lieutenant 8 June 1898. He served in the South African War, 1899-1902; was present at the Relief of Ladysmith, including action at Colenso; operations of 17 to 24 January 1900 and action at Spion Kop; operations of 5 to 7 February 1900, and action at Vaal Kranz; in the operations on Tugela Heights (14 to 27 February 1900); operations in Natal, March to June 1900; in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900, including actions at Belfast (26 and 27 August) and Lydenberg (5 to 8 September); in the Transvaal 30 November 1900 to November 1901; during the operations in Orange River Colony, November 1901 to March 1902; performed duties of Assistant Provost-Marshal, and employed with Damant's Horse; Despatches [London Gazette, 8 February and 10 September 1901]; Queen's Medal with five clasps, and King's Medal with two clasps. He was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Algernon Cautley Jeffcoat, Lieutenant, Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by the King 12 May 1902. He was promoted to Captain, Royal Fusiliers, 14 December 1901; was employed with the Egyptian Army 13 May 1904 to 15 July 1906. He served in the European War, as DAAG, General Headquarters, British Expeditionary Force, 5 August 1914 to 2 October 1915; as DAA and QMG, 4th Army Corps, British Expeditionary Force, British Armies in France, 3 October 1915 to 29 August 1916; as AA and QMG, 9th Division, British Armies in France, 30 August 1916. He was given the Brevet of Lieutenant Colonel 3 June 1917. He was created a CMG in 1916, and a CB in 1919; was five times mentioned in Despatches; received the Legion of Honour, Croix de Chevalier, and the Belgian Croix de Guerre. Lieutenant Colonel Jeffcoat's brother, Captain H J P Jeffcoat, DSO, was killed in action in the disaster at Tabelkop. Lieutenant Colonel Jeffcoat married (1st), in 1906, Mabel (who died in 1907), eldest daughter of William Burrows, and (secondly), in 1910, Ethel, daughter of J R Temperley.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers
JeffcoatHenry Jameson PowellCaptainJEFFCOAT, HENRY JAMESON POWELL, Captain, was born 17 January 1872, son of Deputy-Surgeon General J H Jeffcoat, of 12 Avenue Elmers, Surbiton. He was gazetted to the Royal Artillery 27 January 1892; promoted to Lieutenant 27 January 1895, and to Captain. He served in the South African War, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Henry Jameson Powell Jeffcoat, Captain, Royal Horse and Royal Field Artillery. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia, Warrant and Statutes were sent to the sole executor, Captain A C Jeffcoat, DSO (brother), 3 June 1902, as Captain H J P Jeffcoat had been killed in action at Tafelkop on 20 December 1901.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Artillery
JenkinsEdward VaughanLieutenantJENKINS, EDWARD VAUGHAN, Lieutenant, was born 14 October 1879, son of Lieutenant Colonel Vaughan Jenkins. He was educated at Clifton; entered the West Riding Regiment 20 May 1899, and served in the South African War, 1899-1902, being present at the Relief of Kimberley; in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900, including operations at Paardeberg (17 to 26 February); actions at Poplar Grove and Driefontein; in the Transvaal, east and west of Pretoria, August to 29 November 1900, including action at Rhenoster Kop; again in the Transvaal 30 November 1900 to 31 May 1902; was Railway Staff Officer (Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; Queen's Medal with four clasps, and King's Medal with two clasps). He was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Edward Vaughan Jenkins, Lieutenant, West Riding Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He was promoted to Lieutenant 19 February 1900; was employed with the King's African Rifles 22 April 1902 to 21 April 1912; became Captain 15 April 1904; served in East Africa, 1905, in command of an expedition (Despatches [London Gazette, 13 March, 1908]; served at Nandi, 1905-06 (Medal with two clasps). He served in the European War from 1914; was promoted to Major 1 September 1915, and was Assistant Embarkation Staff Officer, Southampton, from 5 February 1919. Major Jenkins married, in 1904, Evelyn Marie, eldest daughter of Lieutenant Colonel Germon, JP, Norfolk Regiment.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
(Duke of Wellington's) West Riding Regiment
JenkinsFrederickCaptainJENKINS, FREDERICK, Captain, served in South Africa, 1901-2, taking part in operations with the Imperial Yeomanry in Cape Colony, Orange River Colony and the Transvaal; was mentioned in Despatches [London "Gazette, 29 July 1902]; received the Queen's Medal with five clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 31 October 1902]: "Frederick Jenkins, Captain, Imperial Yeomanry. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He has retired from the Second Cinque Ports, Royal Garrison Artillery.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Imperial Yeomanry
JenkinsonGeorge Seymour CharlesMajorJENKINSON, GEORGE SEYMOUR CHARLES, Major, was born 18 February 1858, son of J H Jenkinson, of Ocklye, Crowborough, Sussex. He entered the Army in May 1878; was promoted Captain in December 1884; served in the Burmese Expedition, 1885-87, where he was severely wounded (Medal and clasp). He became Major, June 1896; saw active service on the West Coast of Africa in the Northern Territories of the Gold Coast, 1897-98 (Medal with clasp). He retired in October 1899 to the Reserve of Officers, from the Derbyshire Regiment, and served with the 15th Battalion Imperial Yeomanry during the War in South Africa, 1900-1. He was mentioned in Despatches, received the Queen's Medal with clasp, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "George Seymour Charles Jenkinson, Major, Imperial Yeomanry. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by the King 29 October 1901. He became Lieutenant Colonel, Northamptonshire Yeomanry, 29 November 1903. Lieutenant Colonel Jenkinson died 27 September 1907, at Lamport Grange, Northampton. He had married, in 1899, Ada, daughter of Caesar Czarnikow, of Effingham Hill and Eaton Square.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Imperial Yeomanry
JervisSt Leger HenryCaptainJERVIS, THE HONOURABLE ST LEGER HENRY, Captain, was born 7 September 1863, at Godmersham Park, Canterbury, Kent, fifth son of the 3rd Viscount St Vincent and Lucy, daughter of Baskervyle Glegg, of Withington Hall, Chester. He was commissioned in the King's Royal Rifle Corps 6 May 1885, and became Captain in 1893; served in South Africa, 1899-1902, on the Staff (as ADC to Major General, Infantry Brigade, to 15 December 1899, and 9 July to 17 November 1900; Brigade Major 18 November 1900 to 7 November 1901; DAAG from 8 November 1901); was present at Relief of Ladysmith, including action at Colenso (severely wounded). He was twice mentioned in Despatches, 8 February 1901, and 29 July 1902; received the Queen's Medal with four clasps, the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April, 1901 ]: "The Honourable Henry St Leger Jervis, Captain, King's Royal Rifle Corps. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were sent to the Commander-in-Chief in South Africa and presented there. He was promoted to Major 21 February 1903; was made DAAG, South Africa, 1901-4; retired from the King's Royal Rifle Corps, 12 October 1904. On the outbreak of the war he became Temporary Lieutenant Colonel, 3rd Battalion Norfolk Regiment. He married, in 1905, Hilda Maud, daughter of Thomas Collin, and they had two daughters.
DSO, QSA (4) CC OFS RofL Trans, KSA (2). Lovell 1978 est £370.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
King's Royal Rifle Corps
JohnsonArthur EvansCaptainJOHNSON, ARTHUR EVANS, Captain, served in South Africa, 1899-1902. He was wounded; mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 3 December 1901]; awarded the Queen's and King's Medals, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 31 October 1902]: ''Arthur Evans Johnson, Captain, 10th Battalion Imperial Yeomanry. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He retired from the Army 10 August 1902, with the honorary rank of Captain; joined the Reserve of Officers. He served in West Africa, 1906, receiving the African General Service Medal; subsequently became Inspector-General, Northern Nigeria Police (Colonial Civil Service). Lieutenant Colonel Johnson served in the European War, 1914-18, and in Russia, 1919.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
10th Battalion, Imperial Yeomanry
JohnsonCharles ReginaldLieutenantJOHNSON, CHARLES REGINALD, Lieutenant, was born 23 December 1876, son of Lieutenant Colonel C H Johnson, MP, of Thorngumbald, Yorkshire, and of Mrs I Johnson, of Hull, Yorkshire. He was educated at Clifton College, and entered the Army 29 July 1896, in the Royal Engineers in which he was promoted Lieutenant 29 July 1899. He served in South Africa, 1899-1902, taking part in the advance on Kimberley, including actions at Belmont, Enslin, Modder River and Magersfontein; operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900, including operations at Paardeberg, actions at Poplar Grove and Driefontein; operations in the Transvaal, west of Pretoria, July to November 1900, including action at Frederickstad; operations in Orange River Colony, May to July 1900: operations in the Transvaal and Orange River Colony, 1900 to 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 29 July 1902]; received the Queen's Medal with five clasps; the King's Medal with two clasps and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 31 October 1902]: "Charles Reginald Johnson, Lieutenant, Royal Engineers. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He was employed as Instructor at the Royal Military Academy, August 1903 to September 1904, and as Assistant Adjutant, Royal Military Academy, September 1904 to September 1905. He was promoted Captain 29 July 1905, and was from September 1905, to the end of 1908, an officer of a Company of Gentleman Cadets at the Royal Military Academy. From 1909 to 1913 he commanded the 2nd Field Troop, Royal Engineers, which was stationed at Potchefstroom, South Africa. He was promoted Major 30 October 1914. Major Johnson served in the European War, 1914-18. From October 1914 to March, 1916, he commanded the 2nd Field Squadron Royal Engineers, of the 2nd Cavalry Division, and took part in the First and Second Battles of Ypres; from April 1916 to January 1917, he was employed at Aldershot; from February 1917 to March 1919, he was CRE of the 4th Division, and took part in the final advance in October and November 1918. He was wounded twice; was mentioned in Despatches five times; was given the Brevet of Lieutenant Colonel, and created a CMG (1919) for his services. He also has the Order of St Stanislas, 3rd Class. Lieutenant Colonel Johnson married, in 1904, Ida, daughter of F A Hutchinson, of Preston, Yorkshire, and they had two sons.
[CMG], DSO, QSA (5) Bel M-R, Paard Drief Trans (Lt RE), KSA (2) (Lt RE), [1914 trio, Legion dHonneur. Order of St Stanislaus (Russia) 3rd Class with swords]. Lusted 1974 £36. Dixon 1994 £950. Dixon 1999 £1,175 (DSO, QSA, KSA).
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Engineers
JohnsonHarry CecilLieutenantJOHNSON, HARRY CECIL, Lieutenant, was born 19 July 1877, eldest son of Robert Henry Johnson, Lieutenant, 64th Foot. He entered the King's Royal Rifle Corps 17 March, 1897, and was promoted to Lieutenant 8 March, 1899. He served in the South African War, 1899-1902, and took part in the operations in Natal, 1899, including action at Lombard's Kop (severely wounded); was present at the Relief of Ladysmith, including action at Colonso; operations of 17 to 24 January 1930, and action at Spion Kop; operations of 5 to 7 February 1900, and at Tugela Heights (14 to 27 February 1900), and action at Pieters Hill; in Natal, March to June, 1900, including action at Laing's Nek (6 to 9 June); in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900, including actions at Belfast (26 and 27 August), and Lydenberg (5 to 8 September); again in the Transvaal, August 1901 to 31 May 1902; Adjutant, 2nd Regiment, Imperial Light Horse (from 3 January 1901) (Despatches [London Gazette, 8 February and 10 September 1901]; Queen's Medal with six clasps, and King's Medal with two clasps). He was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Harry Cecil Johnson, Lieutenant, King's Royal Rifle Corps. In recognition of Services during the operations in South Africa". He became Captain 7 January 1902. Captain Johnson served in East Africa in 1904, and took part in the operations in Somaliland (Medal with clasp). He served in the European War and died at Cambrai of wounds received in action on 26 August 1914 ('Times', 16 February 1915). Captain Johnson had married, in 1914, Phyllis Dorothy, second daughter of Hugh G Barclay, VD, JP, of Colney Hall, Norfolk, and Evelyn Louisa (who died in 1899), eldest daughter of Sir Stuart Hogg.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
King's Royal Rifle Corps
JohnsonRaymond BazleyCaptainJOHNSON, RAYMOND BAZLEY, Captain, was born 30 January 1877, son of Captain William Johnson, formerly 6th Dragoons, and Mrs Johnson, of Oddington, Moreton-in-Marsh; and grandson of Sir William Arnott, 1st Baronet. He was gazetted to the 1st Dragoons 4 May 1898, and became Lieutenant 5 July 1899, and subsequently Captain, 6th Inniskilling Dragoons. Lieutenant R B Johnson embarked for South Africa, with B Squadron, 6th Inniskilling Dragoons, in SS Jamaican, at Queenstown, on 23 October 1899. You come across him from time to time in "With the lnniskilling Dragoons" (Lieutenant Colonel J Watkins Yardley, CMG, DSO). On 9 February 1900: "At dawn the Boers shelled Slingersfontein Camp for the first time, putting twenty-seven shells into it before our artillery silenced their guns. Simultaneously the enemy in force attacked the windmill posts of Hobkirk's Farm and Bastard's Nek, occupied by the Victorian Mounted Rifles, driving them in, with the loss of one killed and three wounded. Lieutenant Raymond Johnson, with his troop of Inniskilling Dragoons, who were inlying picket, and therefore ready saddled, at once galloped off to seize Hobkirk's Ridge before the enemy could reach it; he was just in time, but was attacked from right front and left rear, being almost surrounded. He dismounted the men, who fought splendidly. One Corporal was killed; another corporal was shot through the sleeve at close range by a young Boer of about fourteen years, whom he had to shoot in self-defence. Another man from one side of a bush poked a Boer in the stomach with the barrel of his unloaded carbine, loaded quickly, and shot the Boer. Five men were cut off, but hid in a kloof and rejoined later. Gallantly the little troop held on to the ridge until Major Dauncey, reinforced by the remainder of the Inniskillings and the South Australians, drove back the enemy, who remained all day sniping from Hobkirk's Farm". On Page 84 of Colonel Yardley's book, we are told how, from Driefontein: "Lieutenant Raymond Johnson, Inniskilling Dragoons, with six men, cleverly found his way, during the night, with General French's Despatches to Lord Roberts at Germiston. He had to elude several parties of the enemy, but returned safely, after a night full of adventures, his mission safely accomplished. He was accompanied by Mr Paterson, the Australian poet and correspondent". On 30 August: "President Kruger was reported to have been at Waterval Onder the previous day, and General French was anxious to obtain news. So B Squadron of the Inniskillings, under Major Dauncey, was ordered to descend to the town and bring away the prisoners we had taken, among whom was a wounded soldier of our own. The enemy, hidden in the rocky kloofs and bush beyond the town, completely commanded the drift and approaches, and also the town itself. The squadron gained the town, galloping over the exposed ground through a hail of bullets. Lieutenant Lawlor, at the head of his troop, was mortally wounded, shot through the body. He was a fine officer and a great loss to the regiment, and died cheery and brave to the last. Major Dauncey himself, charging in advance of his squadron, with Lieutenants Lawlor and Johnson, was grazed by two bullets, but the town was reached. In it none could show without being shot, so cover was taken in the buildings and the prisoners were not brought away till darkness ensured a safe return". On 6 May 1901, Colonel Yardley writes: "Lieutenant Raymond Johnson and Second Lieutenants Dixon and Holland joined at Brakfontein with a draft, but Lieutenant Raymond Johnson left next day to go upon Colonel Rimington's Staff as galloper to his column, which was forming at Standerton". On 23 September, when Colonel Rimington surprised the Boers between the Klip and Bilge Rivers, "Lieutenant R B Johnson, Inniskillings (Provost-Marshal), with his police, came across a small laager of seventeen Boers, who were taken with all their wagons; two were killed and one wounded. It was a smart performance. For their gallant and dashing conduct Lieutenant R B Johnson and Lieutenant F W Moffitt, who was serving under him, were mentioned by Lord Kitchener in Despatches (8 October 1901). On 1 June (1902) a telegram was received from the Commander-in-Chief that peace had been signed on the previous night, 31 May. This news was received by all our troops very quietly. On the breaking-up of the force, 20 June, the Inniskillings marched to Bloeinfontein. A small contingent, under Captain Raymond Johnson, proceeded to England early in June to represent the regiment at His Majesty's Coronation". The record of Captain Johnson's services in the South African War, as given in 'Hart's Army List', is as follows: He served, 1899-1902; took part in the operations in the Orange Free State, March to May 1900, including actions at Vet River and Zand River; in the Transvaal in May and June, 1900, including actions near Johannesburg, Pretoria, and Diamond Hill (11 and 12 June); in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900, including actions at Reit Vlei and Belfast (26 and 27 August); in Cape Colony, south of Orange River, including actions at Colesberg (1 June to 12 February); served as Adjutant, 6th Dragoons, 1 April to 31 May 1902; again during operations in the Transvaal and Orange River Colony, 30 November 1900 to 31 May 1902. For his services in the South African War, Captain Johnson was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September and 3 December 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with five clasps, the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 26 June, 1902]: "Raymond Bazley Johnson, Captain, 6th Dragoons. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He was invested by the King 24 October 1902. Captain Johnson retired from the Inniskilling Dragoons. He served in the European War, as Lieutenant-Commander, Royal Naval Armoured Cars, 1914-15; in the Cavalry Reserve, and as Commandant, School of Instruction, 1916-17; in the Royal Air Force, 1918. He married, in 1912, Lilian, youngest daughter of Herman Eckstein (of Johannesburg), and Mrs R P Cobbold, of Welford Park, Newbury, Berkshire, and they had one son and two daughters.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
6th (Inniskilling) Dragoons
JohnstonHorace JamesCaptainJOHNSTON, HORACE JAMES, Captain, was born at Brighton, Sussex, 30 January 1866, son of Francis John Jobnston of Dunsdale, Westerham, Kent, and Caroline, daughter of Sir Hardman Earle, 1st Baronet. He was educated by Mr Meyrick-Jones, at Yverdon House, Blackheath, London, and privately at Heidelberg and Paris, and joined the Militia Battalion, of the Duke of Wellington's West Riding Regiment, as a Sub-Lieutenant, in 1886. He served in the South African War, 1900— 2, as Assistant Staff Officer to the OC, Western District, from 2 June 1901; operations in Cape Colony, south of Orange-River, 1900; operations in Orange River Colony and Cape Colony, December 1900 to April, 1902. He was mentioned twice in Despatches; received the Queen's and the King's Medals with four clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 31 October 1902]: "Horace James Johnston, Captain, Duke of Wellington's West Riding Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He became Captain, 1902, and Colonel, 1908. He served in the European War, commanding the 8th Battalion Duke of Wellington's West Riding Regiment from 1 January 1915. Colonel Johnston was reported as 'missing' in the action, at Suvla Bay 9 to 11 August 1915, and from private information received, there unfortunately appears to be no doubt that he fell in action on the 9 August 1915. On 28 April, 1904, at Carlow, Ireland, he married Florenw Hope, fourth daughter of William Brown Clayton, of Brown's Hill, County Carlow, and they had two sons: Francis William, born in 1905, and Patrick James, born in 1908, and a daughter, Hope Caroline.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
(Duke of Wellington's) West Riding Regiment
JohnstoneFrancis BuchananMajorJOHNSTONE, FRANCIS BUCHANAN, Major, was born 2 February 1863, son of David Johnstone, of Croy Row, Dumbarton. He was commissioned in the Royal Artillery 22 February 1882; became Captain 23 May 1890; was Divisional Adjutant, RA, 9 October to 17 December 1899; was promoted Major 18 December 1899. He served in the South African War, 1899-1900, taking part in the advance on Kimberley, including actions at Belmont, Enslin, Modder River and Magersfontein. He was present at the Relief of Kimberley; operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900, including operations at Paardeberg (17 to 26 February); actions at Poplar Grove, Karee Siding, Vet River (5 and 6 May) and Zand River; operations in the Transvaal in May and Juno, 1900, including actions near Johannesburg and Pretoria. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901], and created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Francis Buchanan Johnstone, Major, Royal Artillery. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by the King 29 October 1901; the Warrant sent 24 January 1902. He was promoted Lieutenant Colonel 19 January 1908, and Colonel 4 October 1911. From 1 April 1913 to 19 December 1915, he commanded Royal Artillery, Lowland Division, Scottish Command, and 52nd Division, Mediterranean Expeditionary Force; from 20 December 1915 to February 1916, he was Brigadier General, RA, 12th Army Corps, Mediterranean Expeditionary Force, and from 2 November 1916 to 9 March 1918, Brigadier General, RA, 72nd Division, Home Defences. During the European War he was wounded in the Balkan Expedition. He married, in 1887, Edith Arethusa, daughter of Frederick Padwick, of West Thorney, Sussex, and they had one daughter.
DSO, 1911 Coronation, QSA (4) Bel M-R Paard Joh (Maj RHA). Holditch 1996 £950.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Artillery
JohnstoneMontague GeorgeMajorJOHNSTONE, MONTAGUE GEORGE, Lieutenant Colonel, was born 21 March, 1848, second son of General Montague Cholmeley Johnstone and Louisa, daughter of Lieutenant General Sir Henry Somerset, KCB, KH, and granddaughter of Lord Charles Somerset. He was educated at Cheltenham College; joined the Royal Scots Greys on 22 June 1870, and was appointed an extra ADC to the Duke of Marlborough, the Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, 1880. In 1883 he assisted in raising the 2nd Mounted Rifles (Carrington's Horse); took part in the Bechuanaland Expedition, on the Headquarters Staff; served in the South African Campaign, 1900-1, when he commanded a wing of the 4th Scottish Rifles in the operations with Lord Methuen's 1st Division in the Orange River Colony, which led to the surrender of Prinsloo at Slabert's Nek. He was for some time in command of his regiment, and was also Commandant of Boshof. He afterwards was promoted to the command of the 3rd King's Own Yorkshire Light Infantry during its embodiment in the Mediterranean, and for the remainder of the war, which regiment he commanded for six years, until promoted to be its Honourable Colonel. He was mentioned in Despatches; awarded the Medal with four clasps; given a Lieutenant Colonelcy, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 21 September 1901]: "Montague George Johnstone, Major and Honorary Lieutenant Colonel, 4th Battalion Scottish Rifles. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by the King 29 October 1901; the Warrant sent 24 January 1902. Colonel Johnstone has held several military appointments; has been employed by the Master of the Horse, and by the Colonial Office; was Commandant of Lambeth Palace Camp during the Coronation of King Edward VII; belonged to the King's Bodyguard for Scotland; commanded 1st Westminster Battalion National Reserve; held the 1911 Coronation Medal; was a Justice of the Peace for Fife, and had been a Lieutenant Colonel, Reserve of Officers. He married, in 1880, Agnes, widow of Captain Johnston Stansfeld, and daughter of Joseph Harrison, JP, DL, of Galligreaves Hall, and of Samlesbury Hall, Lancashire, and Lord of the Manor of Hadley, Essex; they had two sons: Montague Joseph Charles Somerset, and Reginald FitzRoy Lewis, born on 16 June 1882, and 3 June 1884, and one daughter, Violet Agnes Charlotte Mary. His younger son, in the Cameron Highlanders (1st Battalion), was killed in action during the Great War, 8 September 1914. His elder son served in the Scots Greys, on the Western Front, during the Great War.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
(Cameronians) Scottish Rifles
Joly de LotbiniereHenry GustaveCaptainJOLY DE LOTBINIERE, HENRY GUSTAVE, Brevet Major, was born 10 March, 1868, son of Sir Henry de Lotbiniere, grandson of Gaspard Joly, Seignior of Lotbiniere, and of Louisa Josepha Gowan, and great-grandson of the last Marquis de Lotbiniere. He was educated at Bishop's College School, Lennoxville, and at the Royal Military College, Kingston, Canada; was gazetted, as Second Lieutenant, to the Royal Engineers 28 June 1888. He served for five months on Fortification Work at Gibraltar, 1890; became Lieutenant 28 June 1891; proceeded to India early in 1891, and was employed on the Rawalpindi Water Supply, 1891-92; then on the Frontier at Gligit for two years, opening up the country. After a year's furlough (1905) he returned to India. He was employed in Somaliland, as Resident Engineer, for nearly a year. In 1906 he transferred from Military Works to Public Works, and was employed at Nagpur, Central Provinces, as Executive Engineer, most of the time on Famine Relief Work. He served on the North-West Frontier of India, 1897-98, and took part in the operations on the Samana and in the Kurram Valley (Medal with two clasps); served at Tirah, 1897-98, in the action of Dargai; at the capture of the Sampagha Pass (clasp). He was employed at the War Office in 1899; became Captain 28 June 1899; served in the South African War, 1899-1902, as Staff Officer to Sir Percy Girouard, 1900-1, on railways. He was transferred to Sir John Maxwell's Staff, to form a Native Refugee Department. During this campaign he took part in the advance on Kimberley. He was present during the operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900; in the Transvaal in June 1900; in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900, and in Cape Colony, south of Orange River, 1900. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901, and 29 July 1902]; received the Brevet of Major 29 November 1900; the Queen's Medal with three clasps, and the King's Medal with two clasps. He was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 31 October 1902]: "Henry Gustave Joly de Lotbiniere, Captain and Brevet Major, Royal Engineers. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He returned to England in 1903 and served in the Somaliland Campaign, 1903-4, in charge of a water-boring section (Medal with clasp). From 1906 to 1912 he served in Egypt in the Egyptian Survey Department (Osmanieh, 3rd Class). He served in England for three years, and was sent to France in July 1915, where he served until October 1918. For his services in the European War he was several times mentioned in Despatches; given the Brevet of Colonel 3 June 1916, and received the Belgian Croix de Guerre. He became Lieutenant Colonel 7 October 1915 and Temporary Brigadier General 15 January 1917; returned to England in October 1918, and was employed as CRE, Cambridge District. He married, 31 March 1902, at Newlands, Cape Town, South Africa, Mildred Louisa, daughter of Charles Seymour Grenfell and Elizabeth Grenfell (nee Graham), and they had two sons: Edmond, born 17 March, 1903, and Seymour, born 21 October 1905.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Engineers
JonesFrank AubreyLieutenantJONES, FRANK AUBREY, Lieutenant, was born 4 August 1873. He was a schoolboy at the King's School, Ely and was a King's Scholar, Head Prefect and Sports Champion in 1890. He joined the Welsh Regiment 28 September 1895; became Lieutenant 21 February 1898, and served in Sierra Leone, 1898-99, on the Protectorate Expedition (wounded; Medal and clasp), and in South Africa, 1899—1902, when he was severely wounded; mentioned in Despatches; received the Queen's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Frank Aubrey Jones, Lieutenant, Welsh Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia, etc, were sent to the GOC, Transvaal and Orange River Colony, 15 November 1902, and presented by General Lyttelton at Pretoria 14 January 1903. Captain Jones retired from the Welsh Regiment and rejoined for the Great War. He commanded a Battalion of South African Infantry and was killed by a piece of shrapnel on 11th July 1916. The rest of the Battalion were decimated at Delville Wood.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Welsh Regiment
JonesLlewellyn MurrayCaptainJONES, LLEWELLYN MURRAY, Captain, was born 23 November 1871, son of Major General R Godfrey Jones, Madras Cavalry. He was gazetted to the Liverpool Regiment 17 January 1891; became Lieutenant 1 March 1893; was Adjutant, Liverpool Regiment, 20 March 1898 to 26 August 1902 and was promoted to Captain 5 February 1900. He served in the South African War, 1899-1902, and took part in operations in Natal, 1899, including actions at Rietfontein and Lombard's Kop. He was present at the Defence of Ladysmith; operations in Natal, March to June, 1900; operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, including action at Belfast (26 and 27 August). He served as Adjutant, 1st Battalion Liverpool Regiment, and performed the duties of Commandant, Waterval Onder. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 8 February 1901 (Sir G S White, 23 March, 1900; Sir R H Buller, 9 November 1900), and London Gazette, 10 Sept, 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with three clasps, the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Llewellyn Murray Jones, Captain, The Liverpool Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". Captain Jones was Adjutant, Volunteers, 4 March 1903 to 8 July 1906; became Major 18 September 1909; was Staff Captain, No 4 District, Western Command, 17 November 1913 to 17 November 1914; DAAG, Western Command, 18 November 1914 to 3 January 1916; A A and QMG, 2nd East African Division, East African Force, to 14 February 1916; Base Commandant, East African Force, 15 May 1916 to 20 May 1917. He was AA and QMG, Humber Garrison, 24 April to 25 July 1918; AA and QMG, 35th Division, British Armies in France, from 6 September 1918. Lieutenant Colonel Jones was given the Brevet of Lieutenant Colonel 1 January 1918, and was created a CMG in 1919 for his services in the European War. He married, in 1902, Ida St George, fourth daughter of John W Nicholson, of St John, New Brunswick.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
(King's) Liverpool Regiment
JonesWalter Thomas CresswellLieutenantJONES, WALTER THOMAS CRESSWELL, Lieutenant, was born on 31 January 1874, son of the Reverend George Jones and Rosamond Alice Jones, daughter of Captain Ward, late Devon Regiment. He was educated at Bradfield College, Berkshire, and by the Reverend J Scott Ramsay, Army Tutor; entered the Royal Marine Light Infantry 1 September 1893, becoming Lieutenant 1 July 1894. He served in the South African War with the Naval Brigade; was present in the advance on Kimberley, including actions at Belmont and Enslin (Graspan) (wounded); was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 26 January and 30 March, 1900, and 10 September 1901], and created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 6 November 1900]: "Walter Thomas Cresswell Jones, Lieutenant, Royal Marine Light Infantry. In recognition of services during the war in South Africa". "Admiralty, 9 November 1900 — With reference to the notice in the London Gazette of 6 November 1900, the rank of Walter Thomas Cresswell Jones, RMLI, upon whom His Majesty has conferred the DSO, is Captain, and not Lieutenant, as therein stated". He became Captain on 16 March, 1900. Captain Jones was decorated by Her Majesty the Queen at Windsor 15 December 1900. He served on the China Station, 1901-8. In 1911 he married Hildred, eldest daughter of A St Glair Buxton, and they had one son, Peter Cresswell, born on 8 June 1913, and two daughters: Mary Hildred and Rachel Elizabeth. He became Major 23 April, 1911; was employed in the Naval Intelligence Department, Admiralty, 17 July 1911 to 2 April, 1915. He served in the European War in 1915 (Dardanelles), and was mentioned in Despatches. He became Assistant Director Operations Division, Admiralty War Staff (Staff Officer, 1st Grade); Temporary Lieutenant Colonel 17 September 1915, and was given the Brevet of Lieutenant Colonel 23 April, 1918.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Marine Light Infantry
JordanRichard PriceCaptainJORDAN, RICHARD PRICE, Captain, was born 2 November 1869. He was gazetted to the Gloucestershire Regiment 8 June 1889; became Lieutenant 20 December 1890; was Adjutant, Indian Volunteers, 8 July 1897 to 7 September 1899; became Captain 13 September 1899. Captain Jordan served in the South African War, 1900-2; was present at the Relief of Kimberley; operations in the Orange Free State, February to May, 1900, including operations at Paardeberg (17 to 26 February); actions at Poplar Grove and Driefontein (slightly wounded); operations in Orange River Colony, May to 29 November 1900; operations in Cape Colony, north of Orange River; operations in the Transvaal, Orange River Colony and Cape Colony, 30 November 1900 to May 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with four clasps, the King's Modal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901: "Richard Price Jordan, Captain, Gloucestershire Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by the King 2 June 1902. He was Adjutant, Militia, 16 May 1902 to 15 November 1906. Major Jordan served in the European War from 1914 to 1918, and commanded the 7th Battalion Gloucestershire Regiment from 19 August 1914; that gallant battalion which immortalized itself in Gallipoli by fighting on, on Chunak Bair Ridge, after all its officers had become casualties. Major Jordan was given the Brevet of Lieutenant Colonel 1 January 1918, and became Lieutenant Colonel 11 May 1919. He was created a CMG in 1918.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Gloucestershire Regiment
JourdainCharles Edward ArthurCaptainJOURDAIN, CHARLES EDWARD ARTHUR, Captain, was born 7 May 1869, son of Reverend F Jourdain, MA, RD, Vicar of Ashbourne and Rector of Mapleton, and of Mrs E Jourdain, of 24 St Margaret's Road, Oxford. He was educated at Sandhurst, and entered the Service on the 22nd August 1888, joining the 1st Battalion Loyal North Lancashire Regiment at Mhow, and serving with them at Mhow, Kamptee, Poona, and in Ceylon, from whence he proceeded to Cape Town, where the battalion was stationed at the outbreak of the South African War. From August to December he served as Adjutant of the half-battalion of that regiment outside Kimberley, and took part in Lord Methuen's advance, including the Battles of Belmont, Enslin, Modder River and Magersfontein. He then was given command of the Mounted Infantry Company of his regiment in the 3rd Mounted Infantry, and took part with it in the Relief of Kimberley, the Battles of Paardeberg, Driefontein, Zand River, Johannesburg, capture of Pretoria and Diamond Hill, afterwards being present at the operations near Belfast. He served throughout the whole war from start to finish, and was only absent for one short period of ten days through malaria in 1901, and at the conclusion of hostilities was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 4 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with six clasps, the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Charles Edward Arthur Jourdain, Captain, Loyal North Lancashire Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by the King 24 October 1902; the Warrant sent 4 November 1902. He proceeded home with the battalion in 1902, serving at Devonport and the Curragh, and later serving as Adjutant of his battalion, and also commanding the Depot at Preston. From there he exchanged to the 2nd Battalion at Mauritius, and with them he served at Poona and Bangalore, being awarded the Delhi Durbar Medal, 1911. He was promoted to command the 2nd Battalion in December 1913, and on the outbreak of war he proceeded in command of the battalion to East Africa, where he performed most arduous and efficient service in command of a large district, as well as commanding his own battalion, and at the action of Tanga he displayed great resource and bravery, and it was mainly through the fine stand made by his battalion, which he commanded most efficiently, that the force was able to re-embark and make good its retirement. Colonel Jourdain remained in East Africa for over three years, and then proceeded to Egypt and Palestine, still in command of his battalion. In 1918 his battalion was brought to France, and took part in the first fighting of the counter-offensive in July 1918, under the French General Mangin, near Rheims, where he displayed great bravery, and was killed by a shell on the 29th July 1918, when gallantly leading his battalion in the counter-offensive near Grand Rozoy. He was buried near where he fell on the Grand Rozoy Road. Although his four years' command of the battalion terminated in December 1917, he preferred to remain with his battalion, and he thus met his death after four years' arduous, continuous active service, and seven years' active service, including South Africa. He was awarded by the French General the Croix de Guerre of the 1st Class after his death. He was also awarded the 1914-15 Star and the General Service Medal, and the Victory Medal for the Great War, 1914-18. During the trying campaign in East Africa he was one of the two officers who had never gone sick or been away from duty during the campaign, and in South Africa he was one of the few officers who served right through the campaign. At the time of his death he had nearly completed thirty years' service, the whole of which had been spent in his regiment, to which he was entirely devoted and in which he had served seven years on active service. He married, 9 October 1912, Alexia Grace, younger daughter of Captain Frederick Papilion, RN.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Loyal North Lancashire Regiment
KarslakeHenryLieutenantKARSLAKE, HENRY, Lieutenant, was born 10 February 1879, son of Lewis Karslake. He was educated at Harrow, and at the Royal Military Academy, Woolwich, and joined the 83rd Field Battery 23 June, 1898. He served in the South African War, 1899-1902, and took part in the operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900, including actions at Poplar Grove, Driefontein, Vet River (5 and 6 May) and Zand River; in the Transvaal in May and June, 1900, including actions near Johannesburg, Pretoria and Diamond Hill (11 and 12 June); in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, July to 20 August 1900; again in the Transvaal 30 November 1900 to January 1902, and March to 23 May 1902; also during the operations in Orange River Colony, January to March, 1902 (Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901 and 17 January 1902]; Queen's Medal with four clasps, and King's Medal with clasps). He was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 26 June, 1902]: "Henry Karslake, Lieutenant, Royal Artillery. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He was invested by the King 24 October 1902. He was promoted to Lieutenant, 16 February 1901; was posted to T Battery, RHA, 1901; and to Captain 20 December 1905, and posted on promotion to the 100th Battery, RFA, 1906; was Officer, Company of Gentleman Cadets, Royal Military College, 20 February 1907 to 19 February 1911; posted to the 116th Battery, RFA, in 1911; was a Staff College student, 1912-13. He was posted to the 129th Howitzer Battery, 1914; served in the European War from 1914; became Major 30 October 1914; was Brigade Major, RA, 6th Division, BEF, 9 December 1914 to 22 February 1915; Brigade Major, RA, 12th Division, New Armies, BEF, 6 March to 16 August 1915; GSO2, 3rd Army, BEF, British Armies in France, 17 August 1915 to 26 June 1916; GSO1, 50th Division, British Armies in France, 27 June 1916 to 15 September 1917; GSO1, 4th Division, British Armies in France, 16 September 1917 to 4 August 1918; GSO1, Tank Corps, British Armies in France, 5 August to 25 October 1918; Brigade General, General Staff, Tank Corps, British Armies in France, 26 October 1918 to 1 April 1919; GSO1, Southern Division, British Army of the Rhine. He was mentioned in Despatches; was given the Brevets of Lieutenant Colonel, 1 January 1917, and Colonel, 3 January 1919; was created a CMG in 1916, and was given the Legion d'Honneur. Colonel Karslake married, in 1905, Florence Cecil, daughter of Vice Admiral E Rooke, and they had two sons.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Artillery
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