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(1167 Records)

 Surname   Forename   Rank   Notes   Unit 
HooperRichard GrensideLieutenantHOOPER, RICHARD GRENSIDE, Lieutenant, was born at Plymouth 8 November 1873, son of Richard Brinsley Hooper and Annie Katrine (nee Thorold); was educated at Clifton College, and at Pembroke College, Cambridge; was gazetted to the 5th Lancers 7 December 1895, and served in India till 1898. He served in the South African War, 1899-1900, being present at the Defence of Ladysmith; was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 8 February 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with clasp, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April, 1901]: "Richard Grenside Hooper, Lieutenant, 5th Lancers (now Captain, 21st Lancers). In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by HM the King 29 October 1901. He was ADC to Field Marshal Sir George White at Gibraltar 6 July 1900 to 15 August 1902; was promoted to Captain into the 21st Lancers 29 May 1901; was Instructor, Cavalry School, 9 January to 11 November 1906. He was promoted to Major 25 August 1909, and retired from the 21st Lancers 10 December 1913. He commanded a squadron in the 7th Reserve Calvary Regiment, August 1914, at Tidworth, and was Second-in-Command, 1st Reserve Cavalry Regiment, February 1917, at the Curragh. In 1906 he married Ellen Dorothea, daughter of Sir E Frankland, KCB, FRS, and they had one son, Richard George Frankland Ironside.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
5th (Royal Irish) Lancers
HopkinsonEmiliusCaptainHOPKINSON, EMILIUS, Captain, was born in 1869, eldest son of Jonathan Hopkinson, of Frant, Sussex; was MA, MB (Oxon); MRCS, LRCP, FZS. He served in the South African War, 1900-1; was mentioned in Despatches; received the Queen's Medal with four clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "E Hopkinson, Captain (Medical Officer), 10th Battalion Imperial Yeomanry. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa”. He was Protectorate Medical Officer, Gambia, West Africa, and later Travelling Commissioner, South Bank Province, Gambia. In 1912 Captain Hopkinson published 'A Vocabulary of the Mandingo Language'.
DSO, QSA (4) CC OFS Trans SA 01 (Surg-Capt 56th Coy 15th IY). March 1979 £465.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
10th Battalion, Imperial Yeomanry
Hore-RuthvenChristian MaliseLieutenantHORE-RUTHVEN, THE HONOURABLE CHRISTIAN MALISE, Lieutenant, was born 24 April 1880, third son of the 8th Lord Ruthven and Lady Caroline Annesley-Gore (died 1915), daughter of the 4th Earl of Arran, KP. He was educated at Wellington, and joined the 1st Battalion The Black Watch 3 June 1899. He was promoted Lieutenant 21 October 1900. He served in the South African War, 1899-1902, taking part in the advance on Kimberley, including actions at Magersfontein; operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900, including the action at Vet River; operations in Orange River Colony, including actions at Wittebergen and Witpoort; operations in Cape Colony, south of Orange River, 1899; operations in the Transvaal, December 1900 to January 1902 and February and March 1902. He was mentioned in Despatches three times [London Gazette, 16 March 1900; 10 September 1901, and 29 July 1902]: received the Queen's Medal and King's Medal with five clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 31 October 1902]: "The Honourable Christian Malise Hore-Ruthven, Lieutenant, The Black Watch, Royal Highlanders. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He was promoted Captain 1 May 1906: was attached to the Egyptian Army from 7 May 1906 to 29 July 1908: was ADC to the Viceroys of India and Ireland. Captain C M Hore-Ruthven served in the Great War. He was GSO3, Highland Division, Central Force, Home Defence, 5 to 17 August 1914, and Staff Captain, Scottish Horse Brigade, Central Force, Home Defence, 18 August to 21 September 1914; was Brigade Major, 54th Infantry Brigade, New Armies, British Expeditionary Force, 10 February 1915 to 18 February 1916. He was promoted Major 1 September 1915; was GSO2, 2nd Canadian Division, British Expeditionary Force, British Armies in France, 19 February 1916 to 17 February 1917; GSO1, 5th Canadian Division, England, 27 February to 29 July 1917; GS01, 3rd Canadian Division, British Armies in France, 5 August 1917 to 5 February 1919; GSO1, 15th Division, British Armies in France, 6 February to 31 March 1919; became GSO1, 59th Division, British Armies in France, British Troops in France and Flanders, 1 April 1919. For his services he was mentioned in Despatches; given the Brevet of Lieutenant Colonel 1 January 1917, and was created a CMG in 1918. His favourite recreation was hunting.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Black Watch (Royal Highlanders)
Hore-Ruthven (Master of Ruthven)Walter PatrickCaptainHORE-RUTHVEN, THE HONOURABLE WALTER PATRICK (MASTER OF RUTHVEN), Captain, was born 6 June 1870, eldest son of the 8th Baron Ruthven and Lady Caroline Gore, daughter of the 4th Earl of Arran. He was educated at Eton; entered the Scots Guards 25 July 1891; became Lieutenant 12 February 1896; Captain 11 October 1899; was Regimental Adjutant, Scots Guards, 1 January 1902 to 6 November 1903; was promoted to Major 25 April, 1900; to Lieutenant Colonel 28 January 1915; to Colonel 28 January 1919; was Temporary Brigadier General from 7 March 1916 to 1 January 1917, and from 7 October 1918. He was ADC (Extra) to GOC, Aldershot, 1 January to 31 July 1898; ADC to GOC, Aldershot, 1 August to 8 October 1898; Transport Officer, South Africa, 24 January 1900 to 6 August 1901; DAA and QMG, 2nd London Division, London District, 1 April 1908 to 21 January 1911; Brigade Major, Brigade of Guards, London District, 3 February 1912 to 4 August 1914; Brigade Major, 4th Infantry Brigade, BEF, 5 August to 18 November 1914; GSO1, 47th Division, BEF, 2 June to 24 August 1915; GSO1, Guards Division, BEF, 25 August 1915 to 6 March 1916; Brigadier General, GS, 8th Army Corps, British Armies in France, 7 March, 1916 to 1 January 1917; GSO1, London District, 1 January to 18 September 1918; Brigade Commander, 117th Infantry Brigade, British Armies in France, 18 October 1918 to 8 February 1919; Brigade Commander, Brigade of Guards, London District, 9 February 1919. He served in the South African War, 1899-1900; took part in the advance on Kimberley, including actions at Belmont, Enslin, Modder River and Magersfontein; on Staff; was present at the Relief of Kimberley; took part in the operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900, including those at Paardeberg (17 to 26 February); actions at Poplar Grove, Driefontein, Karee Siding, Houtnek (Thoba Mountain), Vet River (5 and 6 May) and Zand River; in the Transvaal in May and June, 1900, including actions near Johannesburg, Pretoria and Diamond Hill (11 and 12 June); in the Transvaal, east and west of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900, including action at Elands River (4 to 16 August); also in Orange River Colony, May to 29 November 1900, including action at Bethlehem (6 and 7 July) and Wittebergen (1 to 29 July). He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 26 January and 16 March, 1900, and 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with eight clasps, and King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "The Honourable Walter Patrick Hore-Ruthven (Master of Ruthven), Captain, Scots Guards. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". For his services in the European War he was seven times mentioned in Despatches; was created a CMG in 1915; a CB in 1919; given the Brevet of Colonel 3 June, 1916, and promoted Colonel. He married Jean Leslie, only daughter of Norman Lampson, of The Farm House, Pont Street, SW, and they had four daughters.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Scots Guards
HorsfallAlfred HerbertLieutenantHORSFALL, ALFRED HERBERT, Lieutenant, was born 29 January 1871, son of Jonas Horsfall, of Yorkshire and Melbourne, Victoria, Australia. He was educated at the Scotch College, Melbourne, and at Melbourne University (MB and ChB 1893). He served in South Africa 1900-1, as Lieutenant, New South Wales Army Medical Corps, and as Medical Officer to the 1st Battalion Cameron Highlanders, and was present at the action near Bethune and march to Pretoria, Diamond Hill and at General Prinsloo's surrender. He received the Queen's Medal with clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Alfred Herbert Horsfall, Lieutenant, New South Wales Army Medical Corps. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by the Governor-General of Canada at Government House, Ottawa. He was promoted Major; became MO, Hamilton, 2nd Australian Commonwealth Military District, 1 July 1912. In the European War he served as Major, RAMC (TF) in the Balkan States and Egypt, for which he was mentioned in Despatches; and as Surgeon, 2nd Northern General Hospital. He was formerly Resident Surgeon at Melbourne and Police Hospitals, Victoria, and Medical Superintendent at Newcastle, NSW, and practised at Newcastle as a surgeon. From 1915-1918 he was Unionist candidate, Pudsey Division, Yorkshire. He did much travelling in America and the Far East; was a lecturer of the Royal Colonial Institute and the Social and Political Education League, and has published, among other works, 'The Anglo-Saxon as an Empire Builder' and 'Australia's Stake in the War'. Major Horsfall married, in 1903, Gertrude Emily, daughter of Colonel C F Stokes, ADC, of Sydney, NSW, and they had one son and one daughter.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
New South Wales contingent
HoskinsArthur ReginaldMajorHOSKINS, ARTHUR REGINALD, Brevet Major, was born 30 May 1871, son of Thomas Hoskins, of Belgrave Road, London. He was commissioned in the North Staffordshire Regiment 23 May 1891; became Lieutenant 9 January 1895, and was employed with the Egyptian Army 20 March 1896 to 31 January 1900. He accompanied the Expedition to Dongola, 1896 (Despatches [London Gazette, 3 November 1896]; served with the Nile Expedition, 1897 (Despatches [London Gazette, 25 January 1898]; served with the Nile Expedition, 1898; took part in the operations at Gedaref (Despatches [London Gazette, 30 September 1898]; 4th Class of the Medjidie; Medal); with the Nile Expedition, 1899; was present during the operations resulting in final defeat of Khalifa. In command, Camel Transport, Flying Column (Despatches [London Gazette, 30 January 19OO]; Brevet of Major 21 March 1900 (promoted to Captain 20 March 1900). He served in the South African War, 1899-1902, on the Staff (Despatches [London Gazette, 29 July 1902]; Queen's Medal with three clasps and King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 31 October 1902]: "Arthur Reginald Hoskins, Brevet Major, North Staffordshire Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He was placed on the list of Officers considered qualified for Staff employment, in consequence of service on the Staff in the Field. He served in East Africa, 1902-3; took part in the operations in Somaliland, on the Staff (Despatches [London Gazette, 2 September 1904]: Medal with clasp). He was DAAG, Egypt, 10 February 1906 to 8 March 1910; became Major 7 April 1910; was GSO2, Staff College, 23 April 1910 to 14 August 1913; was given the Brevet of Lieutenant Colonel 18 January 1911; was Inspector-General, King's African Rifles, 15 August 1913 to 18 September 1914. He served in the Great War; as GSO1, 7th Division, BEF, 12 November 1914 to 24 March 1915; commanded the 8th Infantry Brigade, BEF, 25 March 1915 to February 1916; was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel 10 April 1916; commanded the 1st East African Division, East African Force, 1 April 1916 to 27 July 1917; became Major General 1 January 1917. Major General Hoskins commanded the 3rd Division, Mesopotamian Expeditionary Force, Egyptian Expeditionary Force, from 19 August 1917. He was promoted to Lieutenant General, and was created a KCB in 1919. Sir Arthur Hoskins commanded the North Midlands Territorial Force from 1919.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
(Prince of Wales's) North Staffordshire Regiment
HovellHugh de BerdtMajorHOVELL, HUGH DE BERDT, Major, served in the South African War of 1899-1902. He was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Hugh de Berdt Hovell, Major, Worcestershire Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were sent to the GOC Transvaal 15 November 1902, and were presented at Bloemfontein 16 March, 1903.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Worcestershire Regiment
HowardArthur LMajorHOWARD, Arthur L, Major, entered the Canadian Military Forces, and served in the South African War. He was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 19011: "A L Howard, Major, Canadian Contingent. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia, Warrant, etc, were sent to his son, N G Howard, 18 December 1901, as Major Howard had been killed in action not long after the DSO had been awarded to him. He took part in Riel's Rebellion, 1885. Louis Riel, having escaped after the collapse of his first rebellion in 1870, returned to Canada at the request of the Metis (former trappers, small traders, etc., and mostly of mixed blood) who asked him to help redress their grievances against the Dominion Government. The ensuing campaign to suppress Riel's (Second) Rebellion was a short one, confined to the year 1885, and ended with the defeat of the rebels at Batoche in May. The government's forces were commanded by General Middleton and amongst them was Lieut Arthur Howard, formerly an officer in the United States Army but resident in Canada since 1880. Engaged in the armaments business, he was trying to interest the Canadian Government in the Gatling Gun just as the rebellion broke out and so he immediately volunteered to support Middleton with two of his guns. In fact, one gun was turned over to another unit but Howard and his remaining gun played a decisive role in the four day battle of Batoche. Time and again he saved the regular troops from collapse and he emerged from the fighting with a legendary reputation and the sobriquet ‘Gat' which remained with him for the rest of his life. In view of at least one expert, Batoche was the most important battle fought on the North American continent in which the Gatling Gun proved to be the decisive weapon. Following this theory to its logical conclusion, it is no surprise that the man behind that single gun at Batoche became a Canadian folk-hero overnight. During the Boer War, he volunteered for service after war broke out and served with various Canadian units until given command of a corps of scouts, the Canadian Scouts. He was commended for his actions several times but that recorded on 7 July 1900 was perhaps the most typical of the hero of Batoche. Lt Col Anderson, Commanding 1st MI Corps, reported: “I would again bring this officer's name to notice as having done exceptionally good work with his Machine Gun. At Leewburg on 7th July, Lt. Howard took his gun up into the firing line… and very materially assisted in keeping the enemy back. When the line was outflanked and compelled to retire, Lt. Howard, having had his own horse, his Sergt.'s horse and the gun horse hit, also the gun carriage hit twice, took the Gun off the carriage and walked away with it under his arm…Lt. Howard's coolness in action is remarkable and he and his gun are always to be relied upon…..” This kind of bravado occasionally however brought him into conflict with authority and when Col. Lessard reprimanded him for disobeying orders and thereby endangering his life, Howard retorted that “he was quite prepared to give his life; that the war could not be won by remaining in camp; and that he did not believe in inaction” [source: Hilder papers]. Hilder goes on to state that “he was, eventually killed on 17 February 1901 when he, and some of his men of the Canadian Scouts, were caught in an ambush. He would not surrender and kept on firing until he had used up the last of his ammunition”.
DSO, NW Canada Medal 1885 (1) Saskatchewan (unnamed), QSA (5) CC OFS Belf DH Joh (Lt R Can Dragoons). Glendinings 1990 £3100. eMedals Dec 06 Can $ 12,500. eBay Nov 08
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Canada contingent
HowardGeoffrey WestonLieutenantHOWARD, GEOFFREY WESTON, Lieutenant, was born 14 December 1876 third son of Henry Howard, of Stone House, Worcester. He entered the Army as a Second Lieutenant in the Essex Regiment 1 December 1897, and was promoted Lieutenant 29 January 1901. He was ADC to Major General South Africa, from 5 March 1900 to 21 July 1908, and served in the South African War, 1899-1902. He took part in the Relief of Kimberley; was present during the operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900 including those at Paardeberg (17 to 26 February); actions at Poplar Grove and Driefontein; in the Transvaal in May and June, 1900, including action near Johannesburg, Pretoria and Diamond Hill (11 and 12 June); in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900, including action at Belfast (28 and 27 August); in Cape Colony, south of Orange River, 1899-1900 including; actions at Colesberg (1 January to 12 February) (Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901, and 29 July 1902]; Queen's Medal with six clasps and King's Medal with two clasps). He was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 31 October 1902]: "Geoffrey Weston Howard, Lieutenant, Essex Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He became Captain 25 December 1907, and was appointed GSO3, Malta, 25 April 1914. Captain Howard served in the European War from 1914 to 1918. He held the appointment of Brigade Major, 48th Infantry Brigade, New Armies, BEF, 22 April 1915 to 5 February 1916. He was promoted Major 1 September 1915; was GSO2, 2nd Army, BEF, British Armies in France, 6 February to 11 August 1916; GSO2, 24th Division, British Armies in France, 12 August to 14 October 1916; was Temporary Lieutenant Colonel from 15 October 1916, until given the Brevet of Lieutenant Colonel 3 June 1917; and GSO1, 7th Division, British Armies in France. British Force in Italy, 15 October 1916 to 8 October 1918; Temporary Brigadier General, 9 October 1918 to 3 March 1919, while Brigade Commander of the 145th Infantry Brigade, British Force in Italy; was given the Brevet of Colonel 3 June 1919. He was mentioned in Despatches seven times, and was made a CMG in 1919. He married, in 1905, Meta Minnie Gregory.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Essex Regiment
HowardThomas Walter John WrightLieutenantHOWARD, THOMAS WALTER JOHN WRIGHT, Lieutenant, was born at Sheen, Surrey, in 1865. He was educated at Winchester (and Middle Temple), and served in the Bechuanaland Border Police, and took part in the Matabele War in 1893. He volunteered to ascertain the fate of Alan Wilson's party, Shanghani River. In 1896 he served during the Matabele Rebellion (Despatches; Medal with clasp), and he joined Thorneycroft's Mounted Infantry at the beginning of the Boer War, being dangerously wounded at Spion Kop, and, for gallantry in the field, was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April, 1901]: "T W Howard, Lieutenant, Thorneycroft's Mounted Infantry. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia, Warrant and Statutes were sent to the Commander-in-Chief in South Africa and presented there. His Christian name was afterwards given correctly in the official records. He served in the Zululand Rebellion (Natal Decoration) in 1906. In 1914 he embarked on a cycle journey from Bulawayo to Cairo and by August he had reached German East Africa. In consequence of the outbreak of the war, he was interned and not released until 1917, when he sailed for England and joined the 10th County of London Regiment, but did not serve overseas. He returned to prospecting and mining in South Africa and subsequently Rhodesia, where in 1929 he was re-appointed a JP for Bulawayo. He was a member of the contingent sent by the Pioneer societies to London for the Coronation in 1937, for which he received the medal. Major Walter Howard died in Bulawayo on 22 January 1941. He married, in 1880, Lizzie Amelia (who died in 1905), daughter of G Huddy.
DSO, BSAC Medal for Matabeleland Rhodesia 1896 (Tpr Raafs Column), QSA (2) Rhod (not entitled) RofL (LT DSO TMI), KSA (2) (renamed/not entitled), Natal (1) 1906 (Tpr Natal Carb), BWM, Victory Medal (both renamed/not entitled) 1937 Coronation. DNW Apr 2001 £6,000. Miniature medals DNW Sep 00 £220.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Thorneycroft's Mounted Infantry
HowleyJasper JosephCaptainHOWLEY, JASPER JOSEPH, Captain, was born 5 August 1868, son of Lieutenant Colonel John Howley, DL, of Rich Hill, Lisnagry, County Limerick. He was educated at Oscott College, and at Sandhurst, and joined the Lincolnshire Regiment 11 February 1888, being promoted Lieutenant 9 July 1890, and Captain 19 November 1897. He served in the South African War, taking part in the operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900, including operations at Paardeberg; was present at the actions at Poplar Grove, Karee Siding, Vet River and Zand River; was on active service in the Transvaal in May and June, 1900, including actions near Johannesburg and Pretoria. He was severely wounded; was mentioned in Despatches twice [London Gazette, 8 February and 10 September 1901]; awarded the Queen's Medal with three clasps, and created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Jasper Joseph Howley, Captain, Lincolnshire Regiment. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by the King 17 December 1901. Captain Howley was Adjutant, Volunteers, 19 January 1902 to 10 March 1906, and was promoted to Major 11 March, 1906. He served in the European War, in the Lincolnshire Regiment, accompanying the British Expeditionary Force to France. He fell at Neuve Chapelle 11 March, 1915, being killed instantaneously by a shell in the trench in the early morning while writing orders. His Colonel, Colonel McAndrew, had been killed the day before at almost the same hour, and Major Howley had taken over the command of the regiment. Major Howley was a good cricketer, a member of the MCC and Incogniti, rode well to hounds, and was a good shot. He was unmarried.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Lincolnshire Regiment
HughesAlfred MahoneyCaptainHUGHES, ALFRED MAHONEY, Captain, took part in the South African War 1899-1902, serving as Intelligence Officer. He was twice mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901, and 29 July 1902]; received the Queen's Medal with three clasps; the King's Modal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 31 October 1902]: "Alfred Mahoney Hughes, Captain, Field Intelligence Department. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". He was afterwards Secretary of the Transvaal Repatriation Department, and Inspector of Prisons in the Transvaal; retrenched from the Transvaal Civil Service in 1907 and farmed in Cape Colony. In 1918 he was created a CBE.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Field Intelligence Department
HughesJohn GethinLieutenantHUGHES, JOHN GETHIN, Lieutenant, was born 12 March, 1866. He served in the South African War, 1899 to 1902, and was present at the Relief of Kimberley. Operations in the Orange Free State, February to May 1900, including actions at Poplar Grove, Driefontein, Houtnek (Thoba Mountain), Vet River (5 and 6 May) and Zand River. Operations in the Transvaal in May and June, 1900, including actions near Johannesburg, Pretoria and Diamond Hill (11 and 12 June). Operations in the Transvaal, east and west of Pretoria, July to October 1900, including actions at Reit Vlei and Zilikat's Nek. Operations in Cape Colony, south of Orange River, November 1899 to February 1900, including actions at Colesberg (1 January to 7 February). He served as Adjutant, 1st Regiment, New Zealand Contingent, April and May 1902; was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 16 April, 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with five clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April, 1901]: "John Gethin Hughes, Lieutenant, New Zealand Mounted Rifles. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented to him in South Africa. Lieutenant Colonel Hughes served in the European War from 1914 to 1916; and was created a CMG. He married, in 1909, Marion de Vere, daughter of Robert de Vere O'Connor, of Carrigfoyle, County Kerry.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
New Zealand contingent
HumbyJames FrederickCaptainHUMBY, JAMES FREDERICK, Captain, was born 21 July 1860, son of Fred Peter Humby, of Southbroom, Devizes, Wilts. He was educated in Paris. He joined the 3rd Battalion Royal Irish Rifles, as Second Lieutenant, in 1891, and became Captain in 1896. He served in the South African War, 1900-2; commanded the 54th (Ulster) Imperial Yeomanry from February 1900. He took part in the operations in Orange Free State, February to May 1900; operations in the Transvaal, east of Pretoria, July to 29 November 1900; operations in Orange River Colony and Cape Colony 30 November 1900 to 31 May 1902. He was taken prisoner at Lindley with the 13th Battalion, but escaped 30 August 1900. He became Major in 1901, and commanded the 74th (Dublin) Imperial Yeomanry from June 1901; 8th Battalion Imperial Yeomanry from May 1902. He was mentioned twice in Despatches; received the Queen's Medal with four clasps; the King's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 31 October 1902]: "James Frederick Humby, Captain, 8th Battalion Imperial Yeomanry; Major, 3rd Battalion The Royal Irish Rifles. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". Lieutenant Colonel J F Humby served in the European War from 1914 to 1916, and was created a CMG in 1916 for his services. He married, in 1883, Bertha Elizabeth, youngest daughter of Reverend Canon Rich-Jones, of The Vicarage, Bradford-on-Avon.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
8th Battalion, Imperial Yeomanry
HumeCharles VernonMajorHUME, CHARLES VERNON, Major, was born 12 July 1860. He was educated at Marlborough, and entered the Royal Field Artillery on 6 April 1879, as Lieutenant; was ADC to the Commander-in-Chief, West Indies, 28 November 1885 to 20 September 1892. He served in Burma, 1886-87, as Intelligence Officer, 5th Brigade, and ADC to the General in Command; was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 2 September 1887], and received the Medal with clasp. He was promoted to Captain 21 September 1887. From 31 October 1895 to 31 October 1896, he was Staff Captain, RE, North-Eastern District; he was on Special Extra Regimental Employment 1 November 1896 to 20 December 1899, and became Major 8 April 1897. Major Hume was on special service, South Africa, 23 December 1899 to 9 January 1900; was DAAG, South Africa, 10 January 1900 to 30 May 1900; Director of Military Intelligence (graded AAG), South Africa, 31 May 1900 to 1 February 1901. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 8 February and 16 April, 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with five clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April, 1901]: "Charles Vernon Hume, Major, Royal Artillery. In recognition of services during the recent operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented to him by the King 3 June 1901. He was specially employed (Mobilization), Headquarters of Army, 28 May 1901 to 16 July 1903; was Military Attache, Tokio and Korea, 17 July 1903 to 22 December 1904, and 23 December 1904 to 16 July 1907; was promoted Lieutenant Colonel 23 December 1904; attached to the Japanese Army in Manchuria 17 May 1905; was given the Brevet of Colonel 17 March 1906, and created an MVO in 1906, and was employed under the Siamese Government, from 1911. Colonel Hume married, in 1897, Ursula Wilhelmina, daughter of Reginald Dykes Marshall, DL, JP, of Castlerigg Manor, Cumberland, and they had one son and two daughters. He died on 2 February 1915, at Arundel, and a notice of his death appeared in the 'Times' of 4 February 1915.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Artillery
HumphreysGardinerMajorHUMPHREYS, GARDINER, Major, was born 2 March 1865. He was commissioned in the Royal Artillery 8 July 1884; was promoted Captain 14 October 1893, and became Major 5 April 1900. Major Humphreys served in the South African War, 1899-1901; took part in the advance on Kimberley, and was twice slightly wounded. Operations in the Transvaal 30 November 1900 to July 1901; operations in Orange River Colony, July 1901; operations in Cape Colony, July to December 1901. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 10 September 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with six clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 27 September 1901]: "Gardiner Humphreys, Major, Royal Artillery. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The Insignia were presented by the King 12 March, 1902. He became Lieutenant Colonel 14 November 1910, and Colonel 15 June 1914. Colonel Humphreys was Brigadier General, RA, 6th Division, BEF, 27 May 1915 to 21 June, 1916, and Brigadier General, RA, 9th Army Corps, British Armies in France, from 22 June 1916. He was mentioned in Despatches, and created a CB in 1915, and a CMG in 1918. He married, in 1906, Lady Emily Nugent, daughter of the 10th Earl of Westmeath.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Artillery
HumphrisJoseph FrancisLieutenantHUMPHRIS, JOSEPH FRANCIS, Lieutenant, was born 6 May 1868, second son of Edmund Humphris. He joined the South Australian Military Forces in 1888, and was a member of the contingent proceeding to England to take part in the Queen's Diamond Jubilee. He joined the 2nd South Australian Contingent, as Second-in-Command, for service in South Africa, and took part in the march from Bloemfontein to Komati Poort. The Army List says of his services in South Africa that he took part in "operations in the Transvaal in May and June, 1900, including actions near Johannesburg, Pretoria and Diamond Hill. Operations in Orange River Colony. Operations in Cape Colony, south of Orange River, 1900, including actions at Colesberg". He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 16 April, 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with five clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April, 1901]: "J F Humphris, Lieutenant, South Australian Mounted Infantry. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". The decoration was particularly awarded for distinguished conduct while acting as gun escort at Brandfort. Lieutenant Colonel Humphris was placed on the unattached list, Commonwealth Military Forces, and he had the Volunteer Decoration. He became Mayor of Jamestown. He married Frances Emily Chanter, stepdaughter of the Honourable Alfred and Mrd Catt.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
South Australia contingent
HuntFrederick EcksteinSecond LieutenantHUNT, FREDERICK ECKSTEIN, Second Lieutenant, was born 15 December 1879, son of A W Hunt. He was gazetted to the King's Own Royal Lancaster Regiment 26 June 1901, and served in the South African War in 1901, taking part in operations in Cape Colony, January to July 1901. He was mentioned in Despatches [London Gazette, 23 April, 1901]; received the Queen's Medal with two clasps, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 23 April, 1901]: "Frederick Eckstein Hunt, Second Lieutenant, 4th Battalion Royal Lancaster Regiment. In recognition of services at the defence of Fish River Station". The Insignia were presented by the King 29 September 1901. He became Lieutenant, 125th Napier's Rifles, Indian Army, 15 December 1905, and the 29th Lancers, Deccan Horse, in 1905, being promoted to Captain 18 October 1911, and to Major 18 October 1917. He married, in 1908, Helen Ornis (Hebe), youngest daughter of Dr M Cassidy, and they had one son and one daughter.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
(King's Own) Royal Lancaster Regiment
HuntGeorge Percy EdwardLieutenantHUNT, GEORGE PERCY EDWARD, Lieutenant, Royal Navy, was born 15 April, 1863, at Shooling, Southampton, son of George Jenkins Hunt and Mary Hooper. He was educated in the Conway, and left the Mercantile Marine to join the Royal Navy as a Supplementary Lieutenant in October 1895. As a Lieutenant in the Forte he served with distinction with the Naval Brigade in South Africa in 1900, with the two 4.7 guns which did such excellent work. Captain Jones (HMS Forte), in his report, said: “Lieutenant Hunt has acted as Brigade-Major, Quartermaster, Chief of my Staff, all rolled into one, as well as commanding a 4.7 gun after being up the greater part of the night with paper work, after long fatiguing days. His services have been invaluable to me". Lieutenant Hunt was mentioned three times in Despatches, and was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 6 November 1900]: "George Percy Edward Hunt, Lieutenant, Royal Navy. In recognition of services during the war in South Africa". The Insignia, Warrant and Statutes were sent to the Admiralty, and presented by the Governor of the Gambia on board HMS Forte (Admiralty, 23 July 1901). In 1901 Lieutenant Hunt took command of a Naval Brigade landed at Attwaboe, West Africa, for the purpose of capturing 150 mutineers of the West African Regiment. He was promoted to Commander in January 1902, and in the same year served in the Gambia Expedition. On 28 March, 1905, at Wheathampstead, Herts, Commander Hunt married Cecilia Teresa Clementi, third daughter of Right Honourable Sir Cecil Clementi Smith, PC, GCMG He became Captain in June, 1907. In February 1908, Captain Hunt received a letter of commendation from the Lords of the Admiralty for the good result obtained by HMS Prince George in the Annual Test of Gun-layers for 1907. He retired from the Service in July 1913, at the age of fifty, but returned to serve again in August 1914. He was in charge of fitting out merchant cruisers on the Thames, August and September 1914, and their Lordships expressed their appreciation of his services. He was Assistant Captain of HM Dockyard at Devonport at the time of his death, which took place on the 22nd August 1917. He was buried at Almeley on the 25th August 1917. During three years of service in Devonport Dockyard, their Lordships expressed their appreciation of his work in salving vessels on several occasions.
Africa GSM (1) Gambia (Cdr DSO, RN). Spinks 1976 £95.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Navy
Hunter-WestonAylmerMajorHUNTER-WESTON, AYLMER, Brevet Major, was born 23 September 1864, eldest son of Lieutenant Colonel Gould Hunter-Weston and Mrs Jane Hunter-Weston, of Hunterston, Ayrshire, Scotland. He was educated at Wellington College; at the Royal Military Academy, Woolwich, and at the Staff College. He joined the Royal Engineers in 1884, and became Captain in 1892. Lieutenant Hunter-Weston took part in the Miranzai Expedition in 1891, as a Company Officer in the Bengal Sappers and Miners. In 1894 he served as a Captain Commanding a company of Bengal Sappers and Miners in the Waziristan Delimitation Escort, and was present at the night action of Wana (Despatches). He commanded two companies of Bengal Sappers and Miners, and was Acting CRE on Sir William Lockhart's Staff with the Waziristan Field Force, 1894-95 (Despatches; Brevet of Major, and Medal with clasp). He served with the Dongola Expeditionary Force in 1896, as a Special Service Officer on Sir Herbert Kitchener's Staff, and was present at the Battle of Firket (Despatches; 4th Class Medjidie; Queen's Medal; Khedive's Medal with clasp). Brevet Major Aylmer Hunter-Weston served in the South African War from 1899 to 1901. He was successively in command of Mounted Engineers; Commanding Royal Engineers with Lieutenant General French's Cavalry Division; DAAG Cavalry Division; Chief Staff Officer to Lieutenant General French, and finally in independent command of a Mounted Column. He was present at the operations round Colesberg; actions at Dekiel's Drift and Klip Drift; Relief of Kimberley; operations at Paardeberg, and actions near Poplar Grove, Driefontein, Thaba Nchu, Karee Siding, Zand River, Johannesburg, Diamond Hill, Belfast, Carolina, Barberton, Ermelo, Pietretief, etc. During the advance to Pretoria he commanded the cavalry raids described below. Lieutenant General Sir Aylmer Hunter-Weston, Royal Engineers, gained the DSO while holding the rank of Brevet Major, for distinguished service in the South African War (1899-1901), and especially for his success in breaking through the Boer positions and cutting the railway behind them. He commanded five such raids, the parties in each case being composed of Mounted Royal Engineers and Cavalry. His principal raids were made with the object of cutting the railway (1) north of Bloemfontein, at Rustfontein, 13 March; (2) north of Kronstadt, near Amerika Siding, 11 and 12 May; (3) north of Bloemhof, at Grootvlei, 22 and 23 May; (4) east of Pretoria (Delagoa Bay Railway), 1 and 2 June; and (5) north of Pretoria 5 June, 1900. For his services in command of these raids he was created a Companion of the Distinguished Service Order [London Gazette, 19 April, 1901: "Aylmer Hunter-Weston, Brevet-Major, Royal Engineers. In recognition of services during the operations in South Africa". For his further services in the South African War, Brevet-Major Aylmer Hunter-Weston was mentioned in Despatches; received the Queen's Medal with seven clasps, and was given the Brevet of Lieutenant Colonel. After the South African War, Brevet Lieutenant Colonel Aylmer Hunter-Weston commanded a Field Company, Royal Engineers, at Shorncliife till 1904, when he was made DAAG, 4th Army Corps in London. He was transferred to the General Staff on its inception, and served on the General Staff in the Eastern Command from 1904-1908; in the Scottish Command, 1908-11; and as Assistant Director of Military Training, General Staff, War Office, 1911-14. In February 1914, he was promoted to Brigadier General, and given the command of the 11th Infantry Brigade at Colchester. On the outbreak of War, August 1914, he took the 11th Infantry Brigade of the 4th Division to France and took part in the Great Retreat, and in all the battles in France and Flanders up till February 1915, when he was sent home to command the 29th Division (Despatches four times; promoted Major General for distinguished service in the field). Major General Aylmer Hunter-Weston left England with the 29th Division in March, 1915, and commanded it at the landing at Cape Helles, Dardanelles, on 25 April, and in the subsequent operations on the Gallipoli Peninsula. He was promoted temporary Lieutenant General on 24 May 1915, and commanded the 8th Army Corps at the Dardanelles, and subsequently in France till the conclusion of hostilities, when he was promoted Lieutenant General "for distinguished service in the field". He was created a KCB on 11 August 1915. Sir Aylmer Hunter-Weston of Hunterston was elected MP for his county (North Ayrshire) as Coalition candidate in October 1916, on the nomination of all parties, Unionist, Liberal and Labour, while he was at the front in command of his Army Corps. He was re-elected with an enormous majority in December 1918. Lieutenant General Hunter-Weston married Grace (Lady of Grace of the Order of St John of Jerusalem, only daughter of William Strang Steel, of Philiphaugh, Selkirkshire, on 5 December 1905. He was 27th Laird of Hunterston and head of the ancient families both of Weston of Weston-under-Lizar, and of Hunter of Hunterston. He was JP and DL of Ayrshire; Knight of Justice of St John of Jerusalem, of the English Priory of which Order his collateral ancestor Sir William Weston was Grand Prior on its suppression in England in the time of Henry VIII. He was Commandeur Legion d'Honneur, Grand Officer of the Belgian Crown, Member of the Medjidieh, DSO and KCB.
Source: DSO recipients (VC and DSO Book)
Royal Engineers
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