The regiment was in Ladysmith when the war broke out. They were not engaged at Elandslaagte, but were present and did good work at Rietfontein on 24th October 1899 (see 1st Liverpool Regiment). At the battle of Lombard's Kop or Ladysmith, 30th October (see 1st Liverpool), the 19th Hussars were with the 5th Lancers and some Natal Mounted Volunteers sent out under General French, but were unable to get as far as was intended, and had to be assisted in order to hold their own, and had subsequently to retire.

During the siege the regiment frequently had some fighting. On the night of 7th December one squadron "penetrated some four miles towards the north, destroying the enemy's telegraph line and burning various kraals and shelters ordinarily used by them". On 6th January, the day of the great attack, two squadrons of the 19th Hussars held Maiden's Farm to prevent the Boers attacking Waggon Hill from the west, and part of the regiment were in the fight on the hill itself.

Two officers were mentioned in Sir George White's despatch of 23rd March 1900.

After the relief the regiment was brigaded with the 5th Lancers and 18th Hussars under Major General Brocklehurst, and took part in the advance of General Buller to Volksrust and afterwards to Lydenburg, being constantly engaged.

Four officers were mentioned in General Buller's final despatch, and 5 officers and 6 non-commissioned officers and men in Lord Roberts' despatch of 4th September 1901.

During the second phase of the campaign the regiment was almost always in the Eastern Transvaal, and their history is much akin to that of the 18th Hussars, whom they accompanied on endless expeditions, and with whom they fought in very many actions. In his despatch of 8th August 1901, para 11, Lord Kitchener says: "On 29th July General Kitchener was able to report from Blauwbank the gratifying news of a very successful engagement, in which the 19th Hussars, after a long chase, had recaptured one of the two pom-poms taken from the Victorians on 11th June. The 18th Hussars, who followed the 19th in support, were also able to come up with the enemy and assist in the capture of 32 prisoners and 20 waggons". On 16th August the 19th Hussars had very heavy fighting in dense bush with a large force of the enemy at Elandskraal, North-East Transvaal. The regiment was for a time very hard pressed, but fortunately their old friends, the 18th, again appeared on the scene in time to drive off the enemy and to release 4 officers and 19 men who had been captured.

Three officers and 17 non-commissioned officers and men gained mention in Lord Kitchener's despatches written during the war, and in the final despatch the names of 3 officers and 4 non-commissioned officers were added.

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